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Comments

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P vs. NP Problem Linked To the Quantum Nature of the Universe

gd2shoe Re:I prefer the chewbacca argument (199 comments)

Actually, to a layman such as myself, the summary seems to make good sense.

For instance, I've been wondering for the last few weeks if PvNP might be related to the Arrow of Time.

about 4 months ago
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Time Dilation Drug Could Let Heinous Criminals Serve 1,000 Year Sentences

gd2shoe Rehab (914 comments)

I get it, but that's no excuse. You're right, though, that it's hardly the only consideration.

Since the point of this article was to bring up crazy ideas to reevaluate our current systems, why we use them, and what we might do instead - I have a crazy proposal for evaluation. This isn't something that I know will work, but something I'd like to see thought through. It does have a controversial aspect.

There has already been some research done into treating crime like an epidemic. Why not study it like an addiction? People participate in both because they get something out of it emotionally. They are less likely to feel shame and reform if their peers/family accept the behavior. They both breed distrust for societal norms which disapprove of the behavior, socially isolating them from those who might help.

So, how do we deal with addiction? It's not easy to do, but it is something that we have made progress with over the years. Locking people up in rehab for a period of time does help. But it is wholly insufficient on it's own. One of the best ways to quit is some type of 12-step-like program. Criminals today are told that they cannot associate with other felons, as a condition of their parole. This makes sense, but is it really the best way? What if there was an semi-anonymous sponsor program? Felons helping felons to stay out of jail by staying straight?

about 4 months ago
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Time Dilation Drug Could Let Heinous Criminals Serve 1,000 Year Sentences

gd2shoe Re: Ridiculous. (914 comments)

You're using the wrong perspective. Granted, they buried the lead. The end of the summary:

When we ask that question, the goal isn't simply to imagine a bunch of futuristic punishments — the goal is to look at today's punishments through the lens of the future.

It's meant to be a conversation starter. Locking up prisoners for long periods of time isn't a good way to handle things, but I haven't seen one better. We might get there eventually. I see 3 distinct benefits, only one of which may be deemed punishment.

(1) Deterrence, both of recidivism and of new crime. Our current system does measurably bad on the former, and it's pretty hard to estimate the latter.

(2) Most critically, a locked up criminal can't commit more crime while they're behind bars (widely speaking). Playing the law of averages, this means crime is lower, and there are fewer victims.

(3) It gives time for victims to heal emotionally without being harassed by the perpetrator. Also in this category, it makes it harder to enact revenge, and helps prevent most blood feuds. (It only lightens gang wars, but we'd have far more Hatfield/McCoy problems without physically isolating perpetrators from their victims.)

about 4 months ago
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What If the Next Presidential Limo Was a Tesla?

gd2shoe Middle Men (330 comments)

Probably still be required to buy it through a dealer though...

Can someone explain why that is the way it is?

It is a joke relevant to some of the political hijinks that car dealerships have been pulling lately to subvert Tesla. There are several states that now require any car sales to go through a dealer, specifically to prevent direct sales by Tesla.

about 4 months ago
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How Tutankhamun's DNA Became a Battleground

gd2shoe Re: You don't get how it works... (89 comments)

Oscrivellodds was trying to moderate the position of Denzacar by stages. Denzacar, on the other hand, seemed ridiculous, and I can't be sure just how serious he was trying to be*. I'm not worried so much about Oscrivellodds' post, as he was actively trying to move the conversation toward moderation and tolerance (or at least, live and let live). Even if he was being facetious, Denzacar's was a more dangerous post, as it contains actively wrong information, probably heard across some other church's pulpit, if I were to take a guess.

*("And yet nobody is rounding them up into prisons and concentration camps under suspicion of conspiracy to kill everyone on the planet!" - the over use of exclamation marks in the vicinity is telling, probably of sarcasm, but not necessarily)

about 4 months ago
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How Tutankhamun's DNA Became a Battleground

gd2shoe Re: You don't get how it works... (89 comments)

I think I am lacking context. I cannot tell if your post is profound, sarcastic, inane, or "pun-ny".

To give context back, one of the central tenets of our faith is given in AoF 1:11 - "We claim the privilege of worshiping Almighty God according to the dictates of our own conscience, and allow all men the same privilege, let them worship how, where, or what they may."

Thus, if someone is wholly opposed to my belief system, yet they still consider me a harmless nut, they will be capable of honoring my agency to choose how I worship. It is a minimum state that permits inter-faith (and intercultural) cooperation.

This does not preclude calm, rational (preferably friendly) religious discussion (and even very sensitive debate), but it does absolutely require respect.

(Addendum: "Bible bashing" does not show respect, and is a really bad idea. The devil can quote scripture - Matt 4:6. Even if what is said is true, he enjoys conflict. Any two godly people who disagree should be able to do so with civility. The Internet makes that a bit harder because any disagreement is often read in an angry voice, even if the writer didn't so intend.)

about 4 months ago
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How Tutankhamun's DNA Became a Battleground

gd2shoe Re:You don't get how it works... (89 comments)

And we're not sure either! ;-)

"But of that day and hour knoweth no man, no, not the angels of heaven, but my Father only." - Matt 24:36-37, reaffirmed in D&C 49:7

But since it could be just about any time, there's no sense in being caught unprepared. As the saying goes, a broken clock is right twice a day. (not strictly true, but whatever) We'll be right eventually. Until then, people can just chalk it up to eccentricity.

about 4 months ago
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How Tutankhamun's DNA Became a Battleground

gd2shoe Re:You don't get how it works... (89 comments)

I dunno, harmless nut is an upgrade from what most angry people call us. I'll take it.

about 4 months ago
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How Tutankhamun's DNA Became a Battleground

gd2shoe Re:You don't get how it works... (89 comments)

They are actively fulfilling a Biblical prophecy ONLY by determining genealogical lineage AND then baptizing the dead. Simply baptizing them just makes them Mormon. In the minds of the LDS followers.

No, no, no, no, no.

http://mormon.org/faq/proxy-baptisms
Jesus Christ taught that baptism is essential to the salvation of all who have lived on earth (see John3:5). Many people, however, have died without being baptized. Others were baptized without proper authority. Because God is merciful, He has prepared a way for all people to receive the blessings of baptism. By performing proxy baptisms in behalf of those who have died, Church members offer these blessings to deceased ancestors. These individuals in the next life can then choose to accept or decline what has been done in their behalf.

You're missing a very, very key element here. Nobody is making anybody else Mormon. That would violate agency. Baptism is a covenant, like a contract. It is a two sided promise. It is valid if, and only if the deceased accepts it. Thus, they are NOT recorded as becoming Mormon, but as having had the saving ordinances performed on their behalf. It is up to them to decide whether the ordinance is valid or not.

This misunderstanding has lead to a lot of unnecessary anger (and heated rhetoric) over the years. Please don't perpetuate it.

Further, it is widely accepted that there will be a thousand years of peace, called the millennium after the return of Christ during which angelic messengers will facilitate cleaning up records that are inaccurate, or no longer exist on behalf of those who still want ordinances performed. The reason to not wait stems from the desire not to make those who are eagerly awaiting the work wait any longer.

For more information on the motivation for Temple proxy work, see:D&C 137. (Note that the Biblical term "prison" is understood as a spiritual state regarding sin, and not a literal one, that baptism facilitates freedom from.)

about 4 months ago
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How Tutankhamun's DNA Became a Battleground

gd2shoe Tut tut tissue (89 comments)

The implication that proxy work is being done for these individuals is unfounded. If they were to do so for the ancient pharaohs, they certainly wouldn't need a tissue sample! That's just ridiculous. No, BYU is studying the genetics, fair and square.

about 4 months ago
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Apple Refuses To Unlock Bequeathed iPad

gd2shoe Re:Lawyers (465 comments)

Of course not, but even without a will, legal documentation should not be hard to get, nor should the family be charged by courts, lawyers, appraiser, etc. It should be routine. It's not like nobody ever dies. Instead, the judicial system uses it as a revenue stream (fees), and then the legislature uses it again in the form of estate taxes.

It's only when family members are bickering and can't settle the issues among themselves that the full weight of the judicial system should be brought to bear. But lawyers just can't see life happening without their involvement.

about 4 months ago
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Apple Refuses To Unlock Bequeathed iPad

gd2shoe Re:Lawyers (465 comments)

Court Fees... Personal Representative Fees... Attorney's Fees... Accounting Fees... Appraisal and Business Valuation Fees... Bond Fees... Miscellaneous Fees... After adding up all of these fees and costs, you can count on probate taking anywhere from 3%-8% of your assets away from your beneficiaries... [quoting from about.com]

Vultures, the lot of them.

Everyone pays taxes, and everyone dies. There ought to be no court fees. (There are now places where you need to pay the fire department if they every come to your property, despite paying taxes. Same thing.) Probate should not be an especially difficult process, nor should it involve fees or necessitate lawyers. Those should be for unusual circumstances.

The government exists to serve the governed, not the other way around. We have forgotten that and let bureaucrats and politicians "restructure" our society to please their own egos and line their pockets.

about 5 months ago
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Apple Refuses To Unlock Bequeathed iPad

gd2shoe Re:Lawyers (465 comments)

This is definitely part of the problem, but I think it runs deeper. There seems to be a philosophy that law should govern everything. And because only lawyers understand the law, they should be involved in every facet of life. It's sickening.

Throughout most of civilization, the average person couldn't afford a lawyer, and we managed inter-personal relationships just fine. Now, we can occasionally afford lawyers, but we can't sneeze without one?

One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them, One Ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them...

Sound familiar?

about 5 months ago
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Apple Refuses To Unlock Bequeathed iPad

gd2shoe Re:Lawyers (465 comments)

I didn't, actually. But not everything in real life is like a TV show. There are still plenty of families that manage to make it through the death of a loved one without tearing the family apart.

People who think that Lawyers need to be involved for each and every death must either have terrible family lives, or have friends and neighbors who do. (Or put too much stock into television episodes)

about 5 months ago
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Apple Refuses To Unlock Bequeathed iPad

gd2shoe Lawyers (465 comments)

The children either want to avoid full probate because of the expense or need to get a new attorney familiar with whatever the affidavit of small estate alternative process is for their jurisdiction.

Sometimes, I just don't understand the Lawyer outlook of the world. If everything is working smoothly between family members, there ought to be no reason whatsoever to involve lawyers, courts, and extra expenses. Yes, there will always be some people who need a legal mediator... but there will always be people who don't need the extra expense and headache.

The idea that the world runs because lawyers exist, and that we must therefore thank them for making life difficult, is perverse and detrimental to society. Sometimes, in order to be helpful, the profession just needs to get out of the way.

about 5 months ago
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Blizzard To Sell Level 90 WoW Characters For $60

gd2shoe Value (253 comments)

[L]eveling is something that takes dozens if not over 100 hours in many cases and people have put serious time and effort into that, and we don't want to diminish that.

I don't know anybody who values 100s of hours of their time at $60. They might not want to diminish that effort, but they have a poor way of showing it. If I played WoW, I'd be insulted.

about 5 months ago
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Japanese Firm Proposes Microwave-Linked Solar Plant On the Moon

gd2shoe Tide Locked (330 comments)

Yes, but it's not always the same half. :-P

The moon is tide-locked to the Earth, not to the sun. The so-called "dark side of the moon" gets just as much sunlight, but it never faces us. Moon based solar collection will have most of the problems that Earth based collection has... and a whole host of new problems.

about 5 months ago
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Japanese Firm Proposes Microwave-Linked Solar Plant On the Moon

gd2shoe Re:I think I've seen this plan (330 comments)

Really...?

First, I'm not sure what to think about the climate change political debate (which has so thoroughly obscured good science through funding bias - in both directions - and social pressure as to make actual scientific discussion practically impossible). So I'm only going to parrot for a bit.

It is all about heat, both change AND absolute. The planet is a complex system that deals with fluctuating carbon quite nicely. But those subsystems only operate well at particular temperatures. As the absolute temperature increases, less carbon gets sequestered, and green house gasses that are already sequestered get released. Thus, absolute heat drives a change in heat.

Or at least, the very loud theories say this. IANAC

about 5 months ago
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Study Shows Agent Orange Still Taints Aging C-123s

gd2shoe Re:Pretty sure the USAF knew (166 comments)

Agent Orange damage can be permanent, and debilitating (at least, as it was used in Vietnam). If some of those planes lasted until 2010, and if the residue in question is at all dangerous, then it's not outrageous to imagine ongoing diagnosis.

In fact, military preparation for decommissioning / dismantling might dramatically increase the risk of airborne particulates containing the substance. (For instance: asbestos is generally quite safe until you stir it up doing remodeling, etc.) It's still a dose that pales in comparison to what happened during the war, but it would be the highest dose encountered from those planes in decades.

about 5 months ago

Submissions

gd2shoe hasn't submitted any stories.

Journals

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Carly Fiorina interview re. her bid for US Senate

gd2shoe gd2shoe writes  |  more than 4 years ago

For those who don't know, Carly Fiorina (former CEO of HP) has thrown her hat in the ring for US Senate. Some see her as the current GOP front-runner. The very popular Northern California radio hosts Armstrong and Getty just had her on-air for a phone interview (podcast, 2nd hour). The interview went fairly well in her favor. She had all the right talking points. She spoke about ousting career politicians, getting regular citizens into office (such as herself) , cutting spending, and supporting small businesses (an endangered species in CA).

Those who have an opinion about her candidacy may write Jack and Joe at ArmstrongAndGetty@Yahoo.com. Their words (and therefore opinions) reach a lot of ears in Sacramento (some important), so what they say will have a minor (but very real) impact in this race. Since they encourage email from their listeners, they receive a large amount of mail on a wide variety of topics. It will take more than a single email from one person for them to really take notice. I bring this up because they will likely have her on again at some point, and they are willing to ask questions they perceive as hard questions. (This interview was fairly pedestrian; they will bring up controversy if they believe any exists.)

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Iraq and WW3

gd2shoe gd2shoe writes  |  more than 6 years ago

I just had a realization. This isn't terribly flushed out, so I don't mind comments to the contrary. Please be sure to justify them, though. I'm jotting it down here so I don't forget about it, and because it falls nicely under slashdot paranoia.

* * *

Back when the Iraq war started, I was dismayed at how utterly political the event was made. By political, in this context, I mean that the war itself was/is used as a playing piece in the Democrat vs. Republican power struggle game. I thought to myself "this is absurd, these are peoples lives that are being played with".

I'm particularly dismayed by the Democrats. They profit most from having a second Vietnam, so that's how this war is being portrayed. It's easy to say that Sadam had no WMDs (let's forget about all the chemical weapons we found, that were barely reported). The more casualties we have, the better. The more savage and reckless our troops, the better. The more the war is mismanaged, the better. The more innocent people die, the better. The more we push for a Vietnam style withdraw (read defeat), the better. Is it any wonder that these are the things that keep winding up in the news? We tend to hear only about the major US victories, and all the defeats (major and minor).

The Republicans AND the white house have not been above reproach either. This war has cost more and gone longer than it should have. The American people can feel this. Never mind how it might be going right now. Most Americans falsely expected a very short occupation. To those people, this war seems to have gone on forever indeed. I still don't know if the white house lied in order to enter the war. I wouldn't put it past them, but I really don't want to accuse them of it either. That would be extremely low to stoop. Yes, there were people who should have known that they were using bad intel. Yet, the Democrats keep screaming that the White House should have some psychic ability to know things like this. They have yet to show the smoking gun that the white house lied when recommending war. That does not keep them from saying so, though. It's good for them politically if they do. If the white house didn't lie, well then the congress would have to take most of the blame for declaring war (including the democrats/Hilary; that was their job, not the white house).

Further, this keeps getting termed a "conflict" because congress never "declared" war. Any so-called-journalist who says that should be fired. Congress did authorize the use of force.
Blood by any other name runs just as red.

* * *

In that light, I realized some of the future implications that this might have. Americans wont want to go to war unless there has been an attack on American soil... Wait a moment... didn't that just happen? Yep, you guessed it. It will be hard to get America to go to war now even IF there has been an attack on American soil. Whether intentionally or not, we are being conditioned to avoid war at whatever cost. If the cost of avoiding war is a worse war later, we'll gladly pay it.

Presuming world war three rolls around at some point, it seems likely that the US will respond in much the same way it did in WW2. It will shove it's head in the sand for as long as possible. The next hitler will have an easier time getting a foothold and it will be a drawn out and bloody war to remove him. It will be much worse precisely because we wont get involved when we need to.

Israel is pretty well sunk. If worse comes to worst, they're on their own. The US isn't capable of going to war on their side. At best, we'll provide them with equipment. There's not a chance that we'll provide them with an army.

If we don't "win" in Iraq, these problems will only be worse. A loss there will almost entirely neutralize our armed forces. Consciously or not, that's what we're really fighting for here.

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USB Solution

gd2shoe gd2shoe writes  |  more than 9 years ago

I was meta-moderating today, and came across an article that I missed several days ago. It concerned Microsoft's plan to introduce DRM (or something similar) to the USB specification.

Their concern: Employees are stealing sensitive information on thumb drives.

Their solution: We require all hardware manufactures to include DRM in the USB specs.

Wait a minute! First, if you cannot trust your employees then you have a problem. Admittedly there are some (read: very few) places where such security is called for. In order to get me to take you seriously, you first need to have these computers totally isolated from the internet. I also wouldn't take you very seriously if you told me that the machines had floppy drives. Now what would happen if you simply took out the "Removable Hard Disk" drivers (or even if Microsoft had a patch that removed automatic volume detection). Tweak the idea a little (find the bugs that I haven't thought of) and voila: you have a viable solution. Easy.

Of course, the easier thing is to simply avoid USB technology. But think ahead, instead of backwards. I cannot stand it when the corporate world wants to make us take a step back in technology to suit their "needs", but especially in freedom...

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non soliciting spam?

gd2shoe gd2shoe writes  |  more than 9 years ago

I just had an unusual occurrence. I'm posting here to solicit opinions. Please tell me what you think about my hypothesis.

I just received an email to my account for one Darby Candi (I found this in the header). This is in my yahoo box by the way. Well, my name is not Darby. All the message said was: "interesting observed". The return address is:"Samuel Luanna"

So I assumed that "Sam" had made an error and had sent his message to the wrong address for whatever reason. But when I sent him a brief reply, the message bounced (unknown account). Upon closer examination of the original header, it appears he had replied to me. While it's hypothetically possible for him to reply to a spoofed message (I've had at least one virus spoof my account), and then quit his service, I'm thinking there is a much more devious (and realistic) explanation.

I'm wondering if some services (yahoo perhaps) are creating blacklist of spam accounts, and not just email contents. Could pretending to send out emails to mistaken addresses be a way to give the account a partially clean record? Something else along these lines perhaps? Does yahoo use spamhaus or such? Any theories would be appreciated.

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Make Corporations Listen!

gd2shoe gd2shoe writes  |  more than 10 years ago I read this today here on Slashdot and want to hold onto the idea. Context: posted in the middle of a debate on the McDonalds coffee lawsuit.

The amount has to be huge because the McDonald's corporation isn't going to give a shit if you award $20,000. It needs to be a big enough judgment that the company has to declare it as an item on its SEC filings.

I like this idea generally. Corporations are (by and large) led by greedy men who actively attempt to be above everything. The only way to get their attention is to take power away from them. Money is one representation of that. Another, to my understanding, is that big investors read SEC filings. Such might draw away potential investors, and upset current investors. The threat of this should at least bring the issue to the CEO's personal attention.

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Anger Management

gd2shoe gd2shoe writes  |  more than 10 years ago

I have decided today that I have no right to be angry when I'm tired
(unless I'm very sure I would be otherwise).

I'm not applying this to everyone, just myself. Being tired clouds one's judgment, can heighten negative emotions, an makes it harder to see someone else's point of view.

Just a thought.

(P.S. In case anyone reads this, I had this thought while trying not to explode at someone today, not because of any rash decision.)

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The religious Government

gd2shoe gd2shoe writes  |  more than 10 years ago

I posted this in a response, but it follows along the lines of what I'm doing here, so I'll post it.

The fundamental theories of the US are religious ones. The idea that all men are created with equal worth and have certain inalienable rights has no bearing whatsoever in the scientific world. For all observed intents and purposes, evil dictatorship is not significantly different than democracy. It's once you define what your trying to achieve that major differences appear. From the framework we normally call "Freedom" it's a matter of making moral decisions that fit reasonably within everyone's religious values, and leaving alone those decisions that need not be made for the good of society.

Where we get into trouble is where we cannot agree on which framework to use. For instance, let's look at abortion from the most fundamental level. It has been well established in our values that children, once born, have certain inalienable rights (as citizens, though immature). The big question is whether or not unborn children have these rights yet, or not. Scientifically speaking, to the best of our knowledge, no one has these rights. Yet our culture and freedom have been enriched by them. Any decision reached would be out of religious nature, whether Judeo/Christian/Muslim, Eastern, Atheist, or other. The measure of a good moral decision is in the consideration it gives to people with different values.

Gambling has similar issues, though they're not quite as pronounced.

It is a separation of church and state, not values and state. Otherwise we would have been in trouble long ago.

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The Dishonest Phone.

gd2shoe gd2shoe writes  |  more than 10 years ago
I just read an article about a new cell phone system that would allow you to lie about where you are, based on prerecorded background noises. I think this is downright wrong. Why should we have to doubt that what we hear in the phone is real. In part, this just leads to tin- foil - hat - syndrome. Besides, how am I supposed to trust a company that helps me to lie?

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IRV ?

gd2shoe gd2shoe writes  |  more than 10 years ago
I've just read a post on slashdot regarding instant runoff voting. If my understanding is correct, I see no drawbacks. I think that this could really help our political system. If anyone wishes to set me straight, by all means. Until then, I'll do a little more research and then probably promote it.

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Marrige in CA

gd2shoe gd2shoe writes  |  more than 10 years ago
With all the controversy going on in this regards, I would just like to express my frustration and thoughts. A few years ago, there was a proposition passed in California in order to define marriage specifically as between a man and woman. The intent of this was to prevent "same sex marriages" from other states to move to California and be recognized as married. What everyone seems to forget is that it wasn't a law. It was a California constitutional amendment.

Now the judiciary in San Francisco who's job is to interpret the law (not decide right and wrong) has decided that they think it should be perfectly legal to perform these weddings. The real argument I've heard in that direction pointed to a different part of said constitution, undoubtedly of earlier origin, and which should be understood as amended. I know the law often doesn't represent us, but it should. It's very upsetting to me when it is this blatant.

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Comments starting "re:"

gd2shoe gd2shoe writes  |  more than 10 years ago
I think I'll start this with a minor pet peeve, nothing important. Here on slashdot most comments posted seem to be beneath the normal reading thresh hold. I guess this is called overflow or something. We get to see the title of the reply, but no more. If I see a reply that starts with "re:" then I won't read it. I don't have time to read every post on slashdot. On the other hand, if there is even a simple title such as "I agree, but..." I will be much more likely to notice it, and may read it if the parent post carries enough weight.

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Starting /. Journal

gd2shoe gd2shoe writes  |  more than 10 years ago
Hello everyone. I intend to use this as a place where I can keep track of ideas that I have throughout the week, mostly philosophical I guess. These are things that I don't mind discussing with people, and they wont always be firm beliefs. Please feel free to respond. If a response causes me to think in a way that I haven't before, it is almost certainly a good thing.

One warning, you may disagree with one of my positions, and you may say so. But please do not post hostility. I will respond to any blatant disregard for my feelings by adding you to my foes page.

As I previewed this, I realized that I might also be a little more candid here than elsewhere. I never intend to offend anyone and usually wish to not offend anyone (subtle difference). If you see something offensive here please know that it wasn't my intention to offend, and try to at least see where I'm coming from before telling me you think I was offensive.

Have a good day!

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