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Comments

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Neovim: Rebuilding Vim For the 21st Century

gentryx Re:Broken link (248 comments)

I hope you refer to the carpal tunnel syndrome, b/c a carpel tunnel is definitely something I'd rather not have in my body.

about a month ago
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Neovim: Rebuilding Vim For the 21st Century

gentryx Re:Broken link (248 comments)

EMACS OTOH is increasingly getting replaced by all kinds of IDE's and what not. The number of new users are dwindling, it has no future.

*citation needed

about a month ago
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'Google Buses' Are Bad For Cities, Says New York MTA Official

gentryx Foxconn and friends were faster (606 comments)

Foxconn is already doing arcologies. Workers never have to leave the company's premises. I don't know whether they already include graveyards.

about 2 months ago
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Mt. Gox Gone? Apparent Theft Shakes Bitcoin World

gentryx Catching the stolen bitcoins... (695 comments)

The list of robbed Bitcoin exchanges is long and growing. In almost all cases the stolen coin can be traced (since all transactions are public thanks to the protocol). I wonder if the running exchanges have some sort of blacklist that detects whether previously stolen funds get moved to their wallets and if they will confiscate those.

about 2 months ago
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Slashdot PT Cruiser Spotted In the Wild

gentryx Re:In Germany... (94 comments)

...or humor.

about 2 months ago
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Engineers: Traffic Studies Use Simulation Software, Not Lane Closings

gentryx Actual scientific traffic sim (265 comments)

For the curious: here is a link to Sumo, which is a real, scientific traffic simulation software developed by the DLR in Germany.

about 3 months ago
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IBM Dumping $1 Billion Into New Watson Group

gentryx Not really tick/tock but rather "drip drip drip" (182 comments)

Computing has always been tiered: a small elite which pioneers what ultimately tickles down to the masses. When the first abacus was made, not everyone was able to use it. But when the masses learned to use it, the Mesopotamian elite already had adopted written language for accounting (sorry, only the German Wiki page contains said info). The first computers were all elitist devices. The masses were using tables to approximate sin/cos/log etc.

Today we call this elite supercomputers. Techniques developed for these eventually get adopted for mainstream hardware. The GPUs we have today are essentially modeled after the vector CPUs used in the supercomputers of the 1980s.

You're right though, that there is a feedback between both: the mainstream with its incredible volume drives manufacturing. As we approach the 7nm wall, manufacturing is becoming increasingly expensive. Only mass markets can finance the required R&D. Supercomputing is increasingly taking advantage of mainstream tech. E.g. ORNL's Titan is based on NVIDIA Tesla K20x GPUs, which technically aren't your average gamer GPUs, but the chips are essentially spin-offs of these.

about 3 months ago
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Intel's Knights Landing — 72 Cores, 3 Teraflops

gentryx Re:Programmability? (208 comments)

Yeah, OpenCL is a different thing. But if you talk to laymen, they will often repeat the marketing speed that you take your OpenMP(!) code written for traditional multi-cores, recompile and enjoy... Not true, in my experience.

about 3 months ago
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Intel's Knights Landing — 72 Cores, 3 Teraflops

gentryx Programmability? (208 comments)

I wonder how nice these will be to program. The "just recompile and run" promise for Knights Corner was little more than a cruel joke: to get any serious performance out of the current generation of MICs you have to wrestle with vector intrinsics and that stupid in-order architecture. At least the latter will apparently be dropped in Knights Landing.

For what it's worth: I'll be looking forward to NVIDIA's Maxwell. At least CUDA got the vectorization problem sorted out. And no: not even the Intel compiler handles vectorization well.

about 3 months ago
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Object Blocking Giant Tunnel Borer Was an 8" Diameter Pipe

gentryx Even worse than NY: Germany (141 comments)

With some cities existing for >1000 years and having been dug over in WW2, there is often no knowing of what to expect when digging through the underground. Recently a builder operating a digger was killed by a WW2 era dud. Experts estimate that there are still 100k duds lying around and each year about 5k are being found.

about 3 months ago
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Is Ruby Dying?

gentryx Re:Typo... (400 comments)

BTW: I just had a look at your website and I'd hazard the guess that there are almost as many typos as words on it. What's your "professional agenda" behind those? ;-)

about 4 months ago
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Is Ruby Dying?

gentryx Re:Short answer: no (400 comments)

Since you seem to believe that a simple typo represents a fallacy, I dare say that your conclusion "Ruby is in serious declining" is a fallacy by itself: in your link Ruby's curve appears to be rather stable (2% over the past 5 years). In my world decline means something different.

You're right though that your search terms are more suitable.

about 4 months ago
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Is Ruby Dying?

gentryx Re:Typo... (400 comments)

What makes you think that this was intentional and not just a typo?

Your agenda. Your post is clearly biased on defending Ruby.

Interestingly I do not have an agenda on Ruby and in fact it was a simple typo. As a non-native speaker I find the way how names and compounds are handled in the English language confusing at best. It's much easier in German: all compounds are written in one single word, no spaces, no dashes. You're allowed to add dashes to make life for the reader easier (Atombombenzündmechanismus is not a handy word).

That would be Ok, we're all biased somehow - but experience taught me that tech people has a strong inclination to include lies and fallacies while arguing on subjects he/she has a bias on.

Isn't it ironic that your own post represents a fallacy? Of course I have the arrogance to assume that I know best which motives my original post was based on -- and which not.

"Javascript" is a word massively disseminated - very improbable that one professional that makes a living in this field would misspell this word the way you did.

See, indeed I am a CS professional. I've specialized in HPC. The way I use Ruby is very different from what the web folks use it for: thanks to Puppet Ruby has become a popular language for managing system configuration, especially for large scale deployments. Hence I do have a significant exposure to Ruby, without ever doing any serious JS coding. And that's what I criticize in TFA: it seems to equate Ruby with "language for web apps". Its argument revolves around "b/c of node.js becoming popular, Ruby is/might be dying". And that's just wrong because even if Rails would just disappear, there would still be tons of valid use cases for Ruby (text mangling, build automation, rapid prototyping, network automation...).

If fact I don't care much about whether Ruby is popular or not. I've used it before Rails was popular, and I wouldn't have any second thoughts about adding another language to my portfolio, should I see any major benefit in it.

about 4 months ago
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Is Ruby Dying?

gentryx Typo... (400 comments)

Nice try (intentionally spelling "java script" is not cute, dude!).

What makes you think that this was intentional and not just a typo?

about 4 months ago
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Is Ruby Dying?

gentryx Finally got it (400 comments)

You're close. Both ways. Funny. 32, not 35. ^^

about 4 months ago

Submissions

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A C++ library that brings legacy Fortran codes to supercomputers

gentryx gentryx writes  |  about 6 months ago

gentryx (759438) writes "In scientific computing a huge pile of code is still written in Fortran. One reason for this is that codes often evolve over the course of decades and rewriting them from scratch is both risky and costly. While OpenMP and OpenACC are readily available for Fortran, only few tools support authors in porting their codes to MPI clusters, let alone supercomputers. A recent blog post details how LibGeoDecomp (Library for Geometric Decompostition codes), albeit written in C++, can be used to port such codes to state-of-the-art HPC systems. Source code modification is required, but mostly limited to restructuring into a new pattern of subroutines."
Link to Original Source
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LibGeoDecomp 0.2.0: an auto-parallelizing computer simulation library for C++

gentryx gentryx writes  |  1 year,14 days

gentryx (759438) writes "The LibGeoDecomp (Library for Geometric Decomposition codes) project has recently released its version 0.2.0. The library can be used together with a huge variety of models, ranging from LBM (CFD, stencil codes) to molecular dynamics simulations (n-body codes). It leverages its specialized API to relieve the user from parallelizing his code and scales on virtually every parallel architecture, be it multi-cores, GPUs, MPI clusters or even GPU-equipped supercomputers."
Link to Original Source
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News from Nvidia's GTC: updated Tesla/Tegra roadmaps

gentryx gentryx writes  |  about a year ago

gentryx (759438) writes "Today Nvidia's founder Jen-Hsun Huang has revealed two new future architectures which are currently being worked on: Volta in the Tesla line and Parker in the Tegra line. Volta will feature 3D chip stacks with through-silicone vias and 1 TB/s of memory bandwidth. Such an off-chip bandwidth would not be possible with the current technology which runs all connections through the rim of the chip. However, these stacks also increase thermal density, which may create other problems. Parker is to use FinFET transistors, which indicates that Nvidia will stick with TSMC as its fabrication partner.

Huang also announced the Nvidia GRID VCA (visual computing appliance), a machine stuffed with 8 dual-chip GPUs, which might be regarded as a GPU mainframe by some, or, since it runs virtual machines, a GPU cloud by marketing.

More details and some key slides are available here."

Link to Original Source
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Wright Brothers Grounded: German Gustav Weißkopf Lift Off 1901

gentryx gentryx writes  |  about a year ago

gentryx writes "Newly found evidence supports earlier claims that Gustave Whitehead (a German immigrant, born Gustav Weißkopf, with Whitehead being the literal translation of Weißkopf) performed the first powered, controlled, heavier-than-air flight as early as 1901-08-14 — more than two years before the Wrights took off. A reconstructed image shows him mid-flight. A detailed analysis of said photo can be found here. Apparently the results are convincing enough that even Jane's chimes in.

His plane is also better looking than the Wright Flyer I."

Link to Original Source
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Humble Bundle 6 Released

gentryx gentryx writes  |  about a year and a half ago

gentryx writes "The next incarnation of the indie games Humble Bundle has been released. Games included are
  • Rochard, a sci-fi platformer
  • Shatter, a reloaded breakout clone
  • Space Pirates and Zombies, 2d, top-down spaceship arcade action
  • Torchlight, an RPG in a fantasy setting
  • Vessel, a puzzle/platform hybrid
  • Dustforce, another take on wiping the dust of the platformer genre
"

Link to Original Source
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Controlled Quantum Levitation Used To Build Wipeou

gentryx gentryx writes  |  more than 2 years ago

gentryx writes "Researchers at the Japan Institute of Science and Technology have build a miniature wipE'out" track using high temperature superconductors and quantum levitation. Right now this is fundamental research, but in the future large scale transportation systems could be build with technology akin to this.

I have a different vision: let Nintendo sell this as an accessory for the Wii U. I'd buy several of these tracks, let the gliders race through the whole house and track them on our TV!"

Link to Original Source
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Trillion-frame-per-second Camera Captures Propagat

gentryx gentryx writes  |  more than 2 years ago

gentryx writes "MIT has published a story on how the fastest camera on earth can capture a trillion frames per second, making it possible to trace for instance how a laser pulse moves through a bootle (more footage here). Ramesh Raskar, one of its inventors, also calls it the world's slowest camera, since the actual capture of the image sequences takes hours. The reason for this is that the camera doesn't take 2d pictures, but just 1d streaks — at a very high framerate. To obtain a 2d movie, the camera has to film the same experiment over and over again, tilted at different angles. However, in its intended use-case the camera only has to take 1d frames anyway: it is meant to study light absorption of molecules."
Link to Original Source
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Autonomous cars navigate Berlin's traffic

gentryx gentryx writes  |  more than 2 years ago

gentryx (759438) writes "Coumputer driven cars have been frequently featured here on Slashdot. After Google testing their cars in traffic, a German team has sent their car through the city of Berlin, which is notorious for its chaotic and dense traffic. It did negotiate the track multiple times, without accidents. The car, dubbed MadeInGermany, is a VW Passat, and has been equipped by TU Berlin with laser scanners, radar, cameras, and odometers — a setup comparable to Google's cars."
Link to Original Source
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One Step Closer to Mind-Reading Machines

gentryx gentryx writes  |  more than 2 years ago

gentryx writes "Researchers at Berkeley have come up with a brain model to reconstruct what you are seeing, using only fMRI measurements and a library of YouTube clips. Possible future uses could be to visualize what comatose or blind patients are seeing, or even to record dreams. Looks like just another one of William Gibson's predictions have come true (after e.g. the Cyberspace). The videos (2nd video, paper) are still blurry, but it's frightening to imagine what could be done with a more precise model and a stealthy fMRI. Ladies and gentlemen: don your tin foil hats!"
Link to Original Source

Journals

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Controlled Quantum Levitation Used To Build Wipeout Track

gentryx gentryx writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Researchers at the Japan Institute of Science and Technology have build a miniature wipE'out" track using high temperature superconductors and quantum levitation. Right now this is fundamental research, but in the future large scale transportation systems could be build with technology akin to this.

I have a different vision: let Nintendo sell this as an accessory for the Wii U. I'd buy several of these tracks, let the gliders race through the whole house and track them on our TV!

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LibGeoDecomp: an Auto-parallelizing Stencil Code Library

gentryx gentryx writes  |  more than 2 years ago

LibGeoDecomp is a C++ class template based library which provides a smooth transition for researchers to port their existing stencil based simulation codes to parallel computers -- from multi-cores to MPI clusters and GPGPUs. In a nutshell, one only has to replace the accesses to neighboring elements by the library functions and let LibGeoDecomp handle the main time and space loops. Essentially the library takes over the parallel programming part, which can be of great help for scientists who'd rather focus on the physics (or chemistry or what ever) part of their research and less on the computer science required to carry it out.
  It's currently in alpha state, but is already being used for medium sized simulations requiring 200 GB of RAM and prodicind 2 TB of output data.

DISCLAIMER: yes, this this my PhD project, so I'm biased.

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One Step Closer to Mind-Reading Machines

gentryx gentryx writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Researchers at Berkeley have come up with a brain model to reconstruct what you are seeing, using only fMRI measurements and a library of YouTube clips. Possible future uses could be to visualize what comatose or blind patients are seeing, or even to record dreams. Looks like just another one of William Gibson's predictions have come true (after e.g. the Cyberspace). The videos (2nd video, paper) are still blurry, but it's frightening to imagine what could be done with a more precise model and a stealthy fMRI. Ladies and gentlemen: don your tin foil hats!"

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