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Senator Who Calls STEM Shortage a Hoax Appointed To Head Immigration

gordo3000 Re: No way! (512 comments)

I understand what you are saying but no country(that i know of) has full disarmament. In almost all cases, cops can carry even while off duty and usually folks with high levels of training can have a gun with minimal issues. Most countries set rules that prevent the ignorant, unstable, or of lesser moral standing from getting one.

The safety is it is so hard to get a gun, basically all criminals don't try(and unlike the US system there aren't glaring holes). An example is Japan. Anyone who shows competence with a gun,passes background checks, and gets licensed can get a shotgun (and after a couple years, a rifle), but handguns are completely limited to police (and military). The outcome is violent crime rates are rock bottom, especially gun based ones.

This is a country that has extremely powerful organized crime (yakuza) and even they don't risk having a gun. The penalties are egregious. And of course, most gun owners are continually monitored (as they are registered) for their mental health and if you start showing signs of instability,they pull your license and you are no longer allowed a gun at home.

I could go through the limits in a couple other countries, but home defense, target shooting, and hunting are usually all protected and it bares out to a society with a MUCH lower murder rate. Many of these countries do almost nothing extravagant to care for mentally unstable individuals, and have similar underclass and diversity to the US (not Japan on diversity) but have done a great job wiping out a lot of deaths and injuries perpetrated by criminals.

I'm not saying its great for everything (I've lived a short while in the UK and a long while in Japan, and I've seen the outcomes first hand), but the idea of the armed civilian who pulls a handgun and stops public crime has long been an exaggeration, and it is made needless if criminals also can't get guns.

And all this doesn't mean I think you have to support more gun regulations or an amendment to the constitution. But it does go back to the original point: common sense in most of the developed world is strong restrictions on guns makes sense, but that isn't the common sense in the US.

5 days ago
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Senator Who Calls STEM Shortage a Hoax Appointed To Head Immigration

gordo3000 Re: No way! (512 comments)

I'd love to see a link. So far, EVERY mass shooter incident where a "civilian" intervened had 1 of 3 asterisk next to it:

1: The gun wielding civilian was either a current off duty police officer or a former police officer (the best example had a police officer who had just quit to go back to school for a higher degree)

2: The shooter was ALREADY DONE SHOOTING,something that is extremely important

3: and in one case, of a true civilian, the man happened to be a former US marine.

The only cases of a regular Joe pulling his gun and trying I have found had the regular joe getting severely injured or killed.

And we can always use occam's razor. We can assume there is a huge media coverup of these incidents, AND groups such as the NRA have been unable to pierce this incredibly well built web of intrigue hiding the truth. Or, far more likely, it just doesn't happen in any way that supports wide, easily purchased guns so it's nicer to bring up cases where it happens and leave out the fact the "civilian" was a police officer or the shooter was out of ammo or had completely left the scene of the crime and was hanging out elsewhere waiting.

about a week ago
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Senator Who Calls STEM Shortage a Hoax Appointed To Head Immigration

gordo3000 Re: No way! (512 comments)

Actually, I'm all for the second amendment and personal firearms (I enjoy target shooting), but the facts bear out a very different case. Even though the US is a well armed country not once have we heard of a mass shooter being stopped by a citizen with a gun.

And he is right, common sense across most developed nations is strict gun control reduces violence, especially murder and frankly, the data in all countries that implemented these changes agrees. Second amendment supporters would do well to recognize that banning firearms does reduce murders, deaths, and the need for an armed and over sensitive police, and that you can go one step less severe making procurement hard and get most of the same benefits. And the general data shows you can have almost all the benefits just making hand guns completely illegal but make rifles and shotguns pretty easy to get.

So his point was common sense (and experience) dictate getting rid of guns massively reduces gun violence. And so it's hard to understand (from those other country perspectives) why its so hard to pass laws to do this in the US (even amendments)

about a week ago
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Parents Investigated For Neglect For Letting Kids Walk Home Alone

gordo3000 Re:nanny state (784 comments)

for some reason almost every other country in the world has a government that can help control the inefficiencies in the health care market, set educational standards, have minimum wages (and laws about time off), non-discrimination hiring standards, and ISP regulations, all far more strictly than the US, and all of which provide far higher quality for far less money than the US. And yet, in every country, a 10 year old getting on the train to go to school miles from home is considered par for the course.

don't conflate the stupidity that goes on in the US with a functioning government.

about two weeks ago
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Study: Belief That Some Fields Require "Brilliance" May Keep Women Out

gordo3000 Re:Families (218 comments)

wow, you didn't even read the article then. The point of the article, to summarize is:

Fields in which inborn ability or unteachable talents are prized produce fewer female PhDs than those where sustained effort and hardwork are valued (believed to be important by participants in that field).

The study in no way links brilliance or that inborn talent with long work hours.

about two weeks ago
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Study: Belief That Some Fields Require "Brilliance" May Keep Women Out

gordo3000 Re:self esteem is not competence (218 comments)

men may be more represented at both ends, but anonymous cowards seem to be over-represented on the "I lack reading comprehension" end.

It wasn't that a person should get a job because they show more work ethic, or that your success or failure are determined by some measure of how hard you try.

The point was marketing of the job. Instead of saying being a theoretical physicist requires you to be born brilliant , say "theoretical physics requires you to work your ass off to build the required skills to get good" when talking to your freshman class.

Seeing as how there are many theoretical physics PhDs who are not "brilliant", but everyone who gets a PhD has to work their ass off for years, it would also be truthful in this particular field.

Marketing matters. You would know this if you had worked on the hiring end in a field that traditionally was very one sided. We actually were able to increase our selectivity and minimum requirements by changing how we marketed certain jobs in finance, because we didn't discourage any men but we were able to convince a lot more women to TRY rather than write it off as "not for them". I was gung ho for this not because I'm a feminist (in fact, I'm pretty extremely sexist), but because I wanted the absolute best analysts so that we made more money and my bonus went up.

about two weeks ago
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Study: Belief That Some Fields Require "Brilliance" May Keep Women Out

gordo3000 Re:It worked on me (218 comments)

I don't know. I meet a lot of folks (even physics PhDs) who are just super impressed with my ability to see mathematical answers. I've always been very good, but then, when I was 2 or 3 I wanted to learn how to count to a million in different languages and I was lucky to be surrounded by people who here and there helped nurture that interest.

Then I have met a few folks who are so unbelievably fluent that I just fall over watching them work. But after years of going both ways, I have realized that ability is not a predictor of success. In fact, the folks who are actually that good by nature and not hard work are so few and far between as to be almost irrelevant. I had a lot of smart, capable professors in college. And some did NOT impress me as math geniuses.

People overvalue that kind of brilliance. By definition a Michael Jordan or Einstein like talent is not something an industry of any sort can be built on. They are too few and far between. Sure Jordan was amazing, but a lot of other players far less amazing had amazingly impactful careers and the same is true in every other field. It's why I always try to encourage folks to just do what they love. If you love it, you are willing to put in the long hours to get good,and that means you will be successful, even if you aren't going into the record books.

about two weeks ago
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Study: Belief That Some Fields Require "Brilliance" May Keep Women Out

gordo3000 Re:Families (218 comments)

THIS!

Tons of my female friends, all extremely smart and hard working, decided to or are deciding to leave the workforce because they want to be the one to raise their kids. As one friend said, once your kids hit elementary school they will have their own friends and social circle and will be busy; the time until their 5 is precious, and you only get to go around once.

Every friend who had a chance to stay at home has done it. Do I (a man) feel jealous? You bet your ass. All my female friends have been able to find work after 3-7 years out of the work force. Sure, they aren't as senior as they could have been, but there was very little negative association with their choice. Could I do that? Not in any country I Have lived so far. Everyone would assume I was wasting my time. I've been lucky, I've been in the midst of changing careers, had have been able to take quite a bit of time at home while my first born is really young but I know I won't be able to do that with his brothers and sisters. If I could just push pause on my career for the next several years and stay at home, I'd happily do that.

about two weeks ago
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Is 'SimCity' Homelessness a Bug Or a Feature?

gordo3000 Re: Not a problem (393 comments)

There is also an incredible lack of knowledge about other systems. The choice isn't between working people starving on the streets and French style socialism where every job and employer has tons of regulation and tons of worker classifications along with huge welfare payments.

I've come to enjoy the Japanese system. It has a fundamental thread of responsibilitythat resonates with me and a strong sense of EVERYONE pays something, even the guy with 0 income for an extended period. It may not be much (20 bucks a month for health insurance) but you are legally required to get it and pay for it. The state will watch out for you, as long as you always fulfill your own responsibilities to society.

And yeah, if you go cheap and try to save 20 bucks don't get sick because you are expected to show an ability to pay immediately (but you can always get back into the state program by paying all your owed back premiums).

about two weeks ago
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Is 'SimCity' Homelessness a Bug Or a Feature?

gordo3000 Re: Not a problem (393 comments)

Actually we have a system where justices are happy to see a not guilty man fry as long as the paper work is in order. Proof of innocence isn't enough, you need to get that paperwork filed in time, and before they throw the switch may not be in time.

about two weeks ago
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Back To the Social Media Future

gordo3000 Re: duh (40 comments)

I thought it was hilarious, some people don't get satire.

And it was interesting to read about all the tech from way before my time. Its funny how many issues you faced we still do,like getting half decent amounts of file space.

about two weeks ago
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Back To the Social Media Future

gordo3000 Re: Handshake (40 comments)

Actually how a person comments on a handshake tells me a lot about their knowledge base.

People who say bad things when meeting folks from countries where shaking hands is against the culture show how little they know.

about two weeks ago
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Anonymous Declares War Over Charlie Hebdo Attack

gordo3000 Re: Favorite Pastime for Muslims (509 comments)

How does blatant stupidity get marked informative? Mughal rule of India was not marked by excessive or significant strife. Nor was there any significant conversions , forced or otherwise. Its why the country try is dominantly Hindu. If 200 million Hindus had been killed, there would hardly be any left

about three weeks ago
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Fraud, Not Hackers, Took Most of Mt. Gox's Missing Bitcoins

gordo3000 Re:explain to me (108 comments)

no. assume you have one transaction 50 blocks ago that requires changing. In order to preserve every other transaction in those 60 blocks, you will need to recalculate all 60 blocks (each block of transactions feeds into the hash algorithm for the next block). There are thousands of blocks that need to be "fixed" to do what you are talking about. The computing power required to "catch up" to the current blockchain is obscene unless everyone agrees to stop working on this blockchain until that is done.

about a month ago
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Box Office 2014: Moviegoing Hits Two-Decade Low

gordo3000 Re:Are people sick of the MPAA? (400 comments)

when talking about broad market performance, any one individual doesn't matter. What matters is how the movies line up with comparable movies in previous, better years.

Usually movie attendance is not driven by biopics. It is driven by large scale blockbusters like Avengers, Iron Man, etc, etc. So when I say this year's movies sucked, I am talking specifically about the movies that were expected to drive attendance but instead fell flat. Add to that several that didn't fall flat but underperformed, and you get a bad year.

what I found amazing is they said the average ticket price was about 8 dollars. I haven't been able to find a theater that cheap since I was in rural Florida growing up.

about a month ago
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Box Office 2014: Moviegoing Hits Two-Decade Low

gordo3000 Re:Are people sick of the MPAA? (400 comments)

I assume you didn't read the article? it doesn't mention sharing but does say this year's movies basically sucked (transformers, spiderman 2) or underperformed (mockingjay) and the only beacon of light was Guardians of the Galaxy.

about a month ago
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U.S. Passenger Vehicle Fleet Dirtier After 2008 Recession

gordo3000 Re:This isn't really surprising at all (176 comments)

your dad isn't wrong, just different view. if you aren't willing to drive a car for 10+ years, there is a sweet spot for the trade in somewhere around 3-4 years. the dumbest thing is trading in at 6 years (of course, this all depends on financing, and the particular car).

about a month and a half ago
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Should IT Professionals Be Exempt From Overtime Regulations?

gordo3000 Re:No (545 comments)

no, because a significant chunk of IT professionals in the valley do not make less than the 69k minimum he is talking about. And for many near that cusp, it would make sense to give them the raise to 70k and not pay overtime.

This article is about the IT professionals making 40k (and they do exist given what is laughably categorized as IT professional) who regularly turn out 60 hour weeks.

about 2 months ago
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Physicist Kip Thorne On the Physics of "Interstellar"

gordo3000 Re:You will not go to wormhole today. (289 comments)

gravitational waves are NOT a prediction of string theory. they are a prediction of General Relativity. The question (kind of) remains whether it is just a mathematical fluke or real, but there is circumstantial evidence they are not just mathematical weirdness.

about 2 months ago
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Physicist Kip Thorne On the Physics of "Interstellar"

gordo3000 Re:Total Boondoggle (289 comments)

rogoff, smart economist, not very good with the law.

The reason you could not bail out homeowners is it was unfeasible in expense. Banks didn't carry a large portion of the mortgages, it was end investors. This means the government would either have to violate standing contract law (you know, what the home owner signed before getting the money) or get EVERY SINGLE INVESTOR to agree. There were no provisions for changes in payouts based on 90 or 95% agreement. You would need everyone to agree to take a loss.

And as the mortgages were stacked in structured bonds, this would mean that the higher risk tranches would get beaten for 100% to protect the AAA tranches as much as possible. good luck getting ANY of those groups to agree to this without first restructuring the payout profile of the bonds, and you would have to do this with EVERY SINGLE DEAL.

Rogoff doesn't realize what he was basically asking for was the government to go in and, one at a time, renegotiate every single mortgage when the lender was a large, diverse group of investors. It's a nice idea, and would have worked if the mortgages were all kept on a bank's balance sheet. But in fact the banks kept almost none of the mortgages and instead just joined investors in owning bonds.

His method would have taken YEARS during a crisis that needed a solution in weeks.

about 2 months ago

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