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Martin Jetpack Closer To Takeoff In First Responder Applications

green1 Re:Not a disruptive technology (53 comments)

You think any service that does rescue missions gets money for this sort of toy? not a chance. This will be used by DHS, Police, maybe even the TSA. But you won't see paramedics flying in one of these things.

2 days ago
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Japanese Maglev Train Hits 500kph

green1 Re:kph.. (418 comments)

kph is routinely used in many metric countries. it's not at all unusual to see it.

about a week ago
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Japanese Maglev Train Hits 500kph

green1 Re:kph? (418 comments)

I live in Canada, and I see kph all the time. I have also seen it used in places in europe.

about a week ago
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Japanese Maglev Train Hits 500kph

green1 Re:Please wait here. (418 comments)

You think the Japanese drove individual cars to the station? That's actually rather funny... Everyone driving their own car everywhere they go is not the culture in Japan (nor would it be even remotely practical with their population density in their major centres)

I'll agree that the train was likely quite safe though.

about a week ago
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Japanese Maglev Train Hits 500kph

green1 Re:kph? (418 comments)

kph is a very normal abbreviation used in much of the world for kilometres per hour. Nothing unusual at all in seeing it here.

about a week ago
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Japanese Maglev Train Hits 500kph

green1 240km/hr? (418 comments)

Sure 500kph is a great achievement, but put it in perspective of what places that are interested in rail travel do, don't compare the speeds to the rail backwater that is North America. Normal trains in Europe do 300kph routinely.

The problem with North American rail travel has never been a technology barrier, it's always been about having any interest in doing better.

about a week ago
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Comcast Kisses-Up To Obama, Publicly Agrees On Net Neutrality

green1 Re:Bad submission (257 comments)

And if that works, we just permanently stop upgrading all links that don't have someone handing us piles of cash from the other end.

We get to claim that we don't throttle any connections, and at the same time, we get to extort money from anyone trying to send our customers more than a ping reply.

Comcast is claiming that not upgrading does not equal throttling, but that's exactly what it is. Their customers are paying for access to the internet, if they don't provide adequate bandwidth on their peering points to support that, it's them that are in the wrong.

This whole thing is really just an attempt to stop government regulation though "you don't need to regulate us, we're already doing what you want!" which really just shows that they're scared because they AREN'T already doing what they fear would be in the rules.

about a week ago
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Flaw in New Visa Cards Would Let Hackers Steal $1M Per Card

green1 Re:Just ask your bank to send you (126 comments)

Depends on your bank. I have credit cards with 2 different banks. At first both of them flat out refused to send me cards without NFC, and as the NFC chip is integrated in to the chip-and-pin setup you can't simply destroy the chip as many Americans can (swipe isn't the usual way of paying around here)

More recently though one of the banks has wisened up and has sent me a non-NFC card, the other one is still NFC enabled.

That said, I have modified my NFC card to significantly reduce it's effectiveness, I scored the edge of the card near the chip deeply enough to break the antenna wire that runs around the periphery of the card. I know I can't make it detect on any NFC pad anymore, so hopefully that makes it relatively secure.

As for people suggesting Faraday cage wallets and such, I'm unconvinced. A proper Faraday cage has to have no gaps, and most of these are not that tightly constructed. I would not be at all surprised if many of them provide only a feeling of security rather than actual security.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: How Useful Are DMARC and DKIM?

green1 Re:working as designed? (139 comments)

I don't want to get her emails whenever she has a statue for sale, and neither does the rest of the planet. If people want to get them, they'll go to her.

I don't care if unsubscribe work. once it's in their inbox it's too late.

about three weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: How Useful Are DMARC and DKIM?

green1 working as designed? (139 comments)

The poster complains that some email marketing (spam) companies don't provide any way to avoid being caught by these anti-spam tools... sounds like a good thing to me...

about three weeks ago
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Smart Meters and New IoT Devices Cause Serious Concern

green1 Re:Cue the first pot grower nabbed by this (168 comments)

That's a very long way away. These systems aren't being put in place by the government, they're being put in place by the corporations. Corporations have it in their best interest to avoid doing things like that because it would draw attention to their surveillance, without any financial benefit to themselves.
What you suggest may happen, but it won't be until the world is wired and the general public is already well aware of it.

about three weeks ago
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Car Thieves and Insurers Vote On Keyless Car Security

green1 Re:I wish I'd thought of that (221 comments)

In other parts of the world they're covered by default. In Japan for example there's never s vi visible from the outside. (I have a Japanese domestic market vehicle, the VIN is on a plate under the hood.

about three weeks ago
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Too Much Privacy: Finnish Police Want Big Euro Notes Taken Out of Circulation

green1 Re:Not only in Finland. (314 comments)

In Canada, I remember buying a computer years ago with a single $1000 bill. The bank looked at us funny when we made the withdrawal, but they ended up being ok with it. The computer wasn't new, it was a private sale of a used computer, when we paid the fellow he looked at us funny and asked if he'd have trouble depositing it, he said he thought that was the currency of criminals or something, but he did accept it.
The somewhat funny part is, it turns out afterwards that he actually was a criminal, we found out later that the computer we had bought had been stolen from a local computer store... (The police, and that computer store, were both very understanding about the situation, and it all ended up working out)

about a month ago
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Flight Attendants Want Stricter Gadget Rules Reinstated

green1 Re:That's not the reason you're being ignored. (406 comments)

.. the only problem being that, if you're in a plane with actual life-vests under the seat, the seat cushions might not be easily detachable as they're not the primary flotation device. Also, is your life-vest located under your seat or in the bin above you? If it's under your seat, can you *reach* it?

I fly canadian airlines, seat cushions as floatation devices are not legal here, so the life vest is under the seat, always. and yes, I can reach it.

More-importantly, which of the exit doors are the kind that swing in and stay there? Which ones come completely off and need to be tossed out the doorway? Do you pull the door into the cabin from the top or bottom? Which doors release by swinging a single arm? Do you swing it up or down? Which ones don't have an arm, but a pull-down lever? Which of those have an additional cover over the lever which you must pull down *first*? Which doors should you not open in a water landing? Which doors have escape-slides? Which ones auto-deploy when you remove the door? Which ones require a tab to be pulled? Which ones detach to become rafts? How do you detach them?

Even more importantly, show me even one airline that includes that information in their safety briefing. (which is what this is talking about, not the seat card) (though I can tell you, the ones in exit rows over the wings you need to pull in and up and then throw out of the plane, they come completely off, you pull from the top. The other doors, and on planes with exit aisles instead of exit rows, swing outward, you use the big lever on the door, they all have escape-slides, and you can use all of them in a water landing, and they all auto-deploy when you open the door (assuming the flight attendant properly armed the door when the instruction to "arm and cross check" came over the PA)

about a month ago
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Flight Attendants Want Stricter Gadget Rules Reinstated

green1 Re:I'm a pilot (406 comments)

I'm not a pilot, however I have volunteered with an air search and rescue group.
On a commercial airliner I glance at the card, take a quick look around at the safety equipment, and completely ignore the "briefing"
On a military or civil airplane, I pay full attention to the briefing, where everything is, and any other information I can get.

The difference is that the commercial airliners are all essentially the same, and haven't changed in decades.
Each military or civil airplane is completely different.
(there's also the bit about flying at 30,000ft, vs flying at 1,000ft (or less) AGL through the rocky mountains...)

about a month ago
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Flight Attendants Want Stricter Gadget Rules Reinstated

green1 Re:That's not the reason you're being ignored. (406 comments)

I have always wondered whether or not it's a lie that if the oxygen bag doesn't inflate that it's still working. It sounds like a load of BS meant to prevent you from freaking out, and fighting with the person next to you who has obviously got a working mask.

Actually it's quite possible. As an EMT, when we give patients oxygen with a mask with a similar bad attached, the bag doesn't always inflate on it's own. Basically the bag inflates if the delivery of oxygen exceeds the amount you're consuming, and deflates if you use more than it's providing. It works as a way of providing a constant flow through fluctuations in demand and/or supply. If the mask isn't sealed well to your face, or if you're hyperventilating because the airplane is crashing and you're not in favour of this particular outcome to your flight, the bag will likely stay deflated, even though you're still getting oxygen through the mask.
When we're giving a mask to a patient, we actually block the oxygen flow for a few seconds before giving it to them to force the bag to inflate, and if they're managing to suck the bag flat we'll turn up the supply until it stays inflated, however our goal is to increase oxygen for someone with breathing difficulties, the airline's goal is simply to provide adequate oxygen to simulate the normal amount you'd have if you weren't in an unpressurized plane at 36,000ft.

about a month ago
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Outsourced Tech Jobs Are Increasingly Being Automated

green1 Re:Outsourced then automated example (236 comments)

Where I live robocalls are already illegal (with exceptions for opt-in such as appointment reminders, and an exemption for political parties... must be nice to write the laws...) How much do you think that has reduced the number of robocalls I receive? If you guessed, not at all, you win. Problem is that Robocalls are generally from overseas and from scammers, there's no practical way for any enforcement.

about a month and a half ago
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US Government Fights To Not Explain No-Fly List Selection Process

green1 Re:It'd be nice... (248 comments)

Show me a libertarian that thinks the government making secret lists of people not allowed to participate in otherwise legal business transactions is a good idea... I'm not sure how libertarianism is the enemy here, it seems that secret government lists removing people's freedoms would be the opposite of libertarianism. Or are you actually trying to argue that a secret government list with zero oversight is a good idea?

about 3 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: What To Do About Repeated Internet Overbilling?

green1 Re:little known trick for ATT (355 comments)

I can't speak for AT&T's implementation, but where I live we also have a TV over DSL provider, and they can definitely tell the difference between TV traffic and non-TV traffic, and therefore can still see what your non-TV traffic totals up to if they want to bill for overage... the plus side is I've never heard of anyone actually receiving an overage bill, but they do reserve the right. This also means that they can limit bandwidth separately for TV and internet services, so for example you could watch 3HD streams (total of approx 18-20megs of bandwidth) but if you turn them all off, they could still limit your internet speed to the 15 meg you're paying for. (often the modem will be trained up at 50-80meg, but you only get the internet speed you pay for with the rest being reserved for the TV's use)

about 3 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: What To Do About Repeated Internet Overbilling?

green1 Re:maybe (355 comments)

Bell Canada and all providers do that up here.

Not "all providers up here", only those where you live, in Western Canada I'm not aware of any PPPoE providers.

about 3 months ago

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