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Study: Global Warming Solvable If Fossil Fuel Subsidies Given To Clean Energy

greenbird Re: How about (385 comments)

Government protects rights that apply to the least popular person as much as to the most popular person. Business gives the rich more rights.

And yet when those businesses fail it's the government that perpetuates those failed businesses. Strange that. You are truly a fool if you believe we live in a capitalist democracy. In the US we live in the imploding hell that Ayn Rand predicted. Capitalism has given way to who can buy the most politicians to pass laws perpetuating obsolete and/or failing business models and businesses. Democracy has given way to who will pay the most to get their business perpetuated.

about two weeks ago
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Court Allowed NSA To Spy On All But 4 Countries

greenbird Re:Uh... Yeah? (242 comments)

Countries have interests. They have a foreign policy aimed at defending these interest.

Collecting all and storing all communications between everyone including US citizens who happen to communicate with someone overseas has absolute nothing to do with "foreign policy aimed at defending these interest" or using "spies as a tool of their foreign policy". If anything it's a detriment to that since resources are being wasted on on irrelevancies rather than being focused on schwerpunkt. It's exclusively a means to control the people. The whole point of the government in the US is that the people are supposed to control the government. What the NSA is doing isn't in their charter. You're argument is what is called a straw man. You're defended a premise that wasn't at issue. At issue is the NSA's actions that have nothing to do with the foreign policy interests of the US.

about three weeks ago
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Fox Moves To Use Aereo Ruling Against Dish Streaming Service

greenbird Re:Jurisdiction (210 comments)

The US writes all the treaties.

And ignores them when they're not convenient. Amazing how that works.

about three weeks ago
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Age Discrimination In the Tech Industry

greenbird Re:Families come first (370 comments)

Greenbird I am truly sorry I did not intend for this to be a TIRADE personally directed at YOU at all.

You do realize this is both the internet and /. so apologies are considered uncouth (and yes that's sarcasm). And unnecessary.

For the record - the guys that work for me get paid TOP DOLLAR and I give raises to the one's who perform. Because I spent most of my career as a developer when I went into management I was extremely determined NOT to become the clueless boss I always had, a.k.a. PHB, okay?

And that's a good thing. More managers like that and maybe the industry will stop turning out nothing but crap. Your response seemed to come across that way though probably through the lack of context you provided here. I'm just constantly amazed by management who seem to somehow expect something for nothing in the tech industry.

A while back I got tired of programming and worked as a headhunter for 2 months. I would get guys from one country - you guess - I would ask "So what are you looking for" and they would answer "X$ more"... I'd be like "There's more to work that just money, what kind of projects would interest you?" and they would say "X$ more". When the first question a prospective hire asks is the rate, they fail the interview.

I would agree that the types that focus exclusively on money aren't usually the best type to work with and often end up being the blowhards you referenced in your earlier post.

And yes, there is nothing worse than the project built entirely by junior guys. Even worse is the client who believed the vendor who told him to fire all the good developers because he could get guys in some third world hell hole for $4/hour. And of course these "developers" took a 3 week programming class...

Worse if you're trying to manage the project but I make a good part of my living cleaning up after crap like that. And it is definitely much more enjoyable if you can do it right from scratch rather than trying to fix something that's already all screwed up.

about a month ago
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Age Discrimination In the Tech Industry

greenbird Re:Families come first (370 comments)

There are now xvalues, glvalues and prvalues

Out of C and C++ to long I guess. It's been a good 10 years since I did any serious work with either. But to make my original point it only took a quick read to grasp those new concepts. When the schooling runs from Nand gates and K-maps on up grasping new things is much easier.

about a month ago
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Age Discrimination In the Tech Industry

greenbird Re:Families come first (370 comments)

As a tech hiring manager I can state with absolute experience and clarity that believe it or not, this is not the best answer. The guy (or gal) who is wooed away by a high salary will disappear just as fast when the next employer comes along and offers $1/Hour more. This approach will also increase outsourcing, as it reinforces the incorrect yet often quoted in management circles foolishness that programmers are like ditch diggers - interchangeable, easily swapped out, etc.

My guess is you are unhappy with your salary and think you should make more. Maybe you should, but if money is all that motivates you, you made a very poor career choice and should consider going into sales.

Wow. You latch on to one statement I made, completely alter the context and then go on a tirade about me being whiny and unhappy. I can only guess you're projecting?

Nothing I said was about me. It was about what I've seen and experienced in my 20+ year career. Personally I choose where I work on more than just the basis of money (although admittedly it's one factor). And the vast majority of people at my level think the same way. A good working environment with good people is worth a goodly chunk of pay. That being said though the long and short of it is you get what you pay for. You pay cheap you're going to get crap. And no, highly skilled individuals aren't going to work for junior pay no matter how much you want to whine about it. It's a pretty simple concept and is applicable to pretty much every field. Higher skill and experience equals higher pay. Why do people expect it to be different in tech?

about a month ago
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Age Discrimination In the Tech Industry

greenbird Re:Families come first (370 comments)

Poppycock! It only takes years because the colleges are failing at producing the quality employee and the company ends up having to re-teach what the grad was supposed to learn in school. Worse, they now may have to unlearn bad habits that the student was taught in that rotten school.

Bullshit. No school of any kind is going to teach you how things work in industry. First off in almost every case the instructors have little if any industry experience. Teaching and working in industry are 2 completely different skill sets. Second a college's job should be teaching fundamentals: language theory, programming theory (e.g. L-Values vs R-Values), data structures, algorithms and the like. Those are the types of things that can be taught in a structured graded environment. Because thirdly there is no way possible for any school to set up a program that would represent what you are going to face once you start working in industry: Working on a team of 10 individuals where the work has to get done no matter that 3 of them are incompetent idiots, requirements changing on a daily bases without changes to resources or schedule, balancing supportability vs reliability vs speed of completion, being to do risk assessments on the fly as conditions change radically throughout a project. Because these types of things are radically different for each project you work on these are things that can't be taught in a classroom environment and are only learned through experience.

As someone said further up these are also intangible skills that are almost always overlooked by HR types and managers who haven't worked in the trenches. And as GP said these are the types of skills that when missing cause software projects to fail or to turn out the kind of crap we typically see when they do manage to "succeed".

The bigger the employer, the more scrutiny they come under. Again, you need some metric to weed out the chaff in a way that won't get you sued in any of a thousand different ways. Some metrics work, some don't.

There is no "metric". As has been discovered using "metrics" like these ends in tossing out the good candidates while hiring the idiots.

Again, it is trying to work within the hiring laws that skew the tables with things like affirmative action How many times has /. had stories about the gender gap or other minority in tech? I see at least a story a week including this story. All these lead to a perception that those groups need to be given preference even over better qualified applicants solely to meet the numbers.

Again bullshit. Did you see the recent diversity numbers put out by the big name tech companies? These "metrics" you claim are supposed to be saving them from diversity issues has resulted in an overwhelmingly white/Asian male majority.

Yet when government does that you get upset??? Throwing money at a problem isn't only foolish it is a quick way to the poor house. What you are calling for is cronyism or nepotism where the only way to get a job is to be in that one person's contact list. That's no way to hire someone and you really don't know why that person may be in that contact list.

You sound like HR or a clueless hiring manager. Throwing money at the highly skilled personnel who will get the job done is exactly how to get the job done and make money. Paying a lot for three highly experience highly skilled people will payoff far more than hiring 10 much cheaper inexperienced college grads who don't have a clue about risk evaluation, supportability, performance, etc... And the people are on the contact list because they are the types that have a history of getting things done and bailed out projects that started with those college grads working on them who cocked them all up.

Way to put your head in the sand and ignore the fact that the universities and colleges are failing in their task of producing qualified students. Or that the current hiring laws are skewed to favor less qualified people simply because they fit a diversity metric. Way to put the failure of the job seekers to manage their expectations on the employer with them wanting to be paid the same as the CEO on their first day.

Again that's just plain wrong. Good schools are doing a fantastic job at teaching what they are supposed to. My school gave me a fantastic basis for developing industry development skills. I could look at a piece of code and evaluate the consequences from the lowest level to the highest level. But then I was placed with a team of people that were all more experienced than I was. Some barely more some at the level I'm at now. They mentored me and guided me in learning the skills that aren't teachable in a classroom environment but are essential to developing good industry software.

about a month ago
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Can Google Connect the Unconnected 2/3 To the Internet?

greenbird Re:Does it really matter? (99 comments)

I don't know about you but news makes my life considerably worse than it would be without it, as news is not so much "news" as it is "bads"

Yeah, things like weather, traffic, political information, pricing information for goods and services, job information, all that does nothing but make people miserable.

You just have no idea how much access to information enriches your life. I dare you to live a year without any access to any news or information source.

about a month ago
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Geothermal Heat Contributing To West Antarctic Ice Sheet Melting

greenbird Re:Queue the deniers (387 comments)

[citation needed]

WTF are you demanding a citation about?

Nobody has yet seen a graviton. Our understanding of gravity is so far utterly theoretical. For example, we have never succeeded in making it in the lab, as we can with magnetism.

Our understanding of pretty much everything is utterly theoretical. For all we know this whole thing is just an illusion and we're in the matrix. We can experimentally in a controlled environment show cause and effect of gravity to a very small margin of error. We can't experimentally show the effect of releasing certain amounts of carbon into the atmosphere on global climate. There is no way to isolate any effects of the carbon verses a million other interactions.

But we do have both contemporary and historical case studies where we can observe the impact (both local and global) of human activity on climate.

Bullshit. Such a study would have to somehow isolate the human effects from all other interaction and effects and we don't even know and/or understand what the vast majority of the interactions are. Otherwise all the study is showing is correlation not causation.

about a month and a half ago
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Geothermal Heat Contributing To West Antarctic Ice Sheet Melting

greenbird Re:Queue the deniers (387 comments)

And yet, science is also based on assumptions.

Yes it is. And the level of trust in those assumptions should be based on how well our theories explain those assumptions.

Every scientific paper doesn't start by explaining gravity, even if it's a factor in whatever it's going to go on and try to prove.

No but what I have a problem with (and didn't express very well in my post) is people claiming the current theories on climate science are as well understood as the theory of gravity. And our understanding of gravity isn't particularly solid either. Our understanding of the complex interactions involved in the climate of this entire planet are miniscule when compared to our understanding of gravity.

about a month and a half ago
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Geothermal Heat Contributing To West Antarctic Ice Sheet Melting

greenbird Re:Queue the deniers (387 comments)

Yes, that's true. But often those breakthroughs target one particular assumption in a core theory, often one that has been causing problems for some time (e.g., the discrepancies regarding the aether theory in 19th-century experiments which led to Einstein's breakthrough in relativity). They don't generally question the entire nature of the underlying scientific paradigm.

Not 99% of science. Most scientists who are working every day in a lab are not actively questioning the foundations of accepted scientific theories. If they did, they'd be wasting their time... and holding back scientific progress.

I don't disagree with most of what you say. For the most part you're saying what saying what I was trying to elucidate but in a much more loquacious and elegant manner. When I wrote my reply I was focus more on climate science specifically although I didn't express that very well. I chalk it up to not having finished my morning caffeine yet. From my knowledge most scientific advance aren't from someone saying "That's wrong. I'm setting out to prove it's wrong." As you stated it's usually more a result of discrepancies in a related experiment or observed phenomenon that don't fit the assumed theory and can't be explained by problems with the method.

That being said here's the part where we differ.

For the majority of climate scientists today, the assumption of global warming has become part of a "hard core" in their research programs. They believe that it's now more productive to treat this assumption as "settled" and focus on investigating other aspects of climate problems, rather than worrying about continuing to debate this fundamental question.

Given the complexity of the system, the scale of the system and our extremely limited knowledge of system's interactions there is no way any theory of how the climate of this entire planet works should in any way be considered settled or part of a "hard core". The problem being that even though they may be right to at least some degree regarding AGW they are most likely largely wrong about the details of how and why and subsequently the consequences and causes of any consequences. These are important because they dictate what mitigating actions may be taken. History shows mitigating actions taken without sufficient understanding of a system usually results in less then desirable if not outright negative result. This has happened over and over in mankind's intervention in nature. We often take a bad situation and make it worse trying to fix it.

Now I'm not saying no action should be taken to try to limit man's contribution to carbon production. I am saying what actions we do take need to based on more solid ground rather than alarmist theories based on insufficient knowledge.

about a month and a half ago
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Toyota Investigating Hovercars

greenbird Re:I get enough flying priuses already. (186 comments)

Now I agree whole heartily with everything you said except:

Although every drivers manual reads we should slow down if someone wants to merge into our lane

This is wrong and it drives me nuts. People don't know how to merge. You're are supposed to drive at a consistent speed if someone is trying to merge into your lane. The merger is supposed to adjust their speed. Their supposed to decide whether to slow down or speed up to merge in front or in back of you. If both start slowing down and speeding up it becomes a confusing guessing game. Now if you mean by slowing down providing enough of an opening for the merger to fit that's another issue. Unless you're driving at a very slow speed if you're following so close that a car can't fit in front of you you're following too close. Tailgating is probably the second most leading cause of serious collisions (whether directly or as a result of reducing wiggle room).

about a month and a half ago
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Geothermal Heat Contributing To West Antarctic Ice Sheet Melting

greenbird Re:Queue the deniers (387 comments)

It means there is a large and growing body of research that has collected diverse and disparate lines of evidence that support the major governing theory on the topic. In particular, it's enough that we can say with a high degree of confidence that the fundamental aspects of the theory of global warming are well founded and reasonably accurate.

The biggest problem with this argument is that our level of understanding of the "climate" system on this planet is miniscule when compared to the complexity of the system. This discovery is just another example. The other problem is that anything that challenges the theory of global warming seems to be either twisted to fit the current theory or ignored. The theory is supposed to be changed to fit the evidence.

That's what some pendants would like you to think. They want you to ignore the fact that science is both a process and the body of knowledge collected (and verified) through that process.

You seem to ignore the fact that science is all about challenging the "verified" body of knowledge collected. That's actually the primary point of science: doing experiments to test current theories and looking for evidence that doesn't fit current theories.

about a month and a half ago
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Geothermal Heat Contributing To West Antarctic Ice Sheet Melting

greenbird Re:Queue the deniers (387 comments)

Yes, it does. It's the only way for practical research to ever happen. You can't go around questioning fundamental assumptions at every turn. This doesn't mean that those fundamental assumptions are "settled" for all time, but from a practical standpoint, science must treat some core assumptions as effectively "settled" in order to get on with any detailed research.

The level of ignorance is astounding. "questioning fundamental assumptions" is exactly what science is all about. Nothing is ever settle in science. Major breakthroughs occur when you successfully challenge fundamental assumptions. And this gets modded up. It's no wonder the current climate debate is so off kilter.

about a month and a half ago
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Geothermal Heat Contributing To West Antarctic Ice Sheet Melting

greenbird Re:Queue the deniers (387 comments)

AGW is a science thing - and science has agreed that it exists though not to which degree.

See. An example of GP's point. Science doesn't agree on things. Science posits theories then performs experiments and looks for evidence that both support and oppose those theories. The problem with the current climate in the climate debate is that any evidence that might oppose current theories tends to get either twisted to fit the current theories or shouted down. It's supposed to work the other way around. The theories are supposed to be twisted to fit the evidence.

could it be that the geology of the antarctic is becoming destabilized because of the lessening of the weight of the ice sheet, in turn causing more geological activity?

Wow. You could not have presented a more perfect example.

about a month and a half ago
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AT&T Charges $750 For One Minute of International Data Roaming

greenbird Re: 50MB = 750$ (321 comments)

T-mobile is the one of the best value plans around

Nothing beats Ting.

about a month and a half ago
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Daniel Ellsberg: Snowden Would Not Get a Fair Trial – and Kerry Is Wrong

greenbird Re:Ellsberg got a fair trial (519 comments)

Well first you need a grand jury to indict them before they go on trial. I'm sure there's a lot of evidence to go over before that happens.

If you really believe there is any chance of that you're seriously delusional. Clapper openly admitted he lied to congress.

Justice rushed is not justice.

Strange you claim this in defending the government officials who admittedly broke the law but have already declared Snowden guilty of a crime he should never even have been charged with.

about 2 months ago
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Daniel Ellsberg: Snowden Would Not Get a Fair Trial – and Kerry Is Wrong

greenbird Re:Ellsberg got a fair trial (519 comments)

I happen to believe in trials. So did the founding fathers.

Huh. No. You're wrong. The founding fathers believed in fair trials and so do I. And that is why using the Espionage Act to prosecute an American revealing illegal government actions to the American people is unconstitutional. But the Constitution means nothing in the US anymore. Also Snowden has not admitted he's is guilty of espionage. But by charging him with that the government gets to suppress any defense based on the fact that he was revealing illegal unconstitutional actions by government agencies.

about 2 months ago
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New Federal Database Will Track Americans' Credit Ratings, Other Financial Info

greenbird Re:the Putin stage (294 comments)

I don't get what "state run" is suppose to mean

What I mean is that the government controls what the news reports. They don't do it directly but rather by quid pro quo between the media conglomerates and the government. If they actually reported things the government didn't want them to they would stop getting all those obscene laws passed (e.g. copyright) that allow them to maintain control of their industries. As one example, the interview that 60 minutes, one of the more respected investigative news shows when I was a young, did with Keith Alexander was ridiculous government scripted propaganda.

about 2 months ago
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HR Chief: Google Sexual, Racial Diversity "Not Where We Want to Be"

greenbird Re:Who gives a shit? (593 comments)

Don't kid yourself, at the beginning of WWII Britain was pretty racist, homophobic, anti-Semitic, as was the US. In the US black people weren't allowed to sit on the same bus seats as white people or even use the same toilets.

I am by no means disillusioned as to the racist proclivities of the Western powers in the mid 20th Century. My point was the Western power's level of racism were fairly mild when compared to those of pre-WWII Germany and Japan. And the Western powers had governments that allowed those attitudes to change in the right direction.

but their primary targets were - the Jews and the Romany gypsies, the mentally ill and gay German people, and the communists - all white.

That's only because those were the only other races they had access to. And it wasn't communists it was Slavs in general. They refused help from a fairly strong Ukrainian separatist movement that would have gone a long way towards helping the war effort against the Soviet Union simple because they were sub-human Slavs.

As for India the Germans funded and aided the rebellion there forcing the British to agree to independence after the war.

If your contention is that Hitler would have treated Indians as a race any better then they did the Slavs I would say that's pretty far out towards the extremely unlikely end of the scale. The support for the anti-British elements in India was simple a means of hindering the British war effort. Had Germany won there is little doubt the people of India would have been treated as the sub-humans Hitler's racial theories declared them as. The anti-British movement in India wasn't increased much by the minor support provided by the Germans. There is little doubt India was on an unalterable road to independence with or without the German support during the war.

They certainly weren't friendly to black people but were no worse than the Allies

Wow. I was not aware of the forced sterilization programs in Britain and the US.

about 2 months ago

Submissions

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Utah the First Official Police State?

greenbird greenbird writes  |  more than 6 years ago

greenbird (859670) writes "I'm shocked both sides of political spectrum aren't freaking over this. Modern technology has made it much easier for both the press and public to expose misconduct by public officials. You would think this would be encouraged by any benevolent government as it makes the world a better place for everyone except wrong the doers. Not so in Utah. After a video obtained through a freedom of information act request appeared on YouTube of a Utah State Trooper tasering someone, State Senator Chris Buttars has introduced a bill that would allow the authorities to keep the public from viewing any information relating to police misconduct. Forget about warrantless spying. This isn't a step towards a police state. This is the police state should this bill be passed and the law upheld. It essentially removes any public oversight of police actions. That any politician could introduce such a law and not suffer fatal backlash is terrifying to me. I would think the press would be screaming about this as it would represent a severe restriction on their ability to investigate and report on police misconduct. They're suppose to be the first line of defense against government overstepping it's bounds."
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Patents involving legal processes are obvious

greenbird greenbird writes  |  more than 6 years ago

greenbird (859670) writes "When a patent involves legal processes the obviousness is obvious to the courts. In "In Re Stephen Comiskey" the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit ruled (pdf warning) Comiskey's "method or system for mandatory arbitration involving legal documents such as wills or contracts" was obvious and therefore not patentable. One argument for rejecting the patent is that applying a computer to automate a manual process is obvious and thus not patentable. There are also some interesting statements in the ruling referencing the original "State Street" decision by the same court that ushered in the patentability of business processes. Legal blogs are interpreting it as a significant reigning in of what's patentable in a number ways. The ruling is somewhat clouded by legal wrangling over the fact that the patent was rejected by the court for different reasons than those used by the USPTO, which is interesting in and of itself. Oral arguments (pdf warning) are here. This appears to represent a turning of the tide since the CAFC has in the past leaned way towards expanding patent holding rights."
Link to Original Source
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It's not just software and bus. process patents

greenbird greenbird writes  |  more than 6 years ago

greenbird (859670) writes "Does the US Patent Office even read the patents before granting them? Here's a patent for putting an LED in a recharger that was filed April 17, 2002 and granted June 22, 2004. Their first extortion victim is Apple who they have sued in every patent trolls favorite court in Marshall, Texas. A great quote via Techdirt from their patent lawyer: "They [Apple] pay us millions of dollars, that's the next step.". How on earth could this patent get approved? I can't recall seeing a recharger without an LED for the last 10 years."
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greenbird greenbird writes  |  more than 7 years ago

greenbird (859670) writes "Another patent fiasco has started. From Wired, a patent on location based internet searches was filed in 1996 and granted in 1999. A patent troll company name Geomas acquired the patent and has filed what they claim will be a long line of lawsuits in none other than Marshall, Texas against Verizon. Geomas has amassed a $20 million war chest in venture capital to use for getting rich off of a clearly obvious idea. When will it end?"
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greenbird greenbird writes  |  more than 7 years ago

greenbird (859670) writes "It's the beginning of the end (in the US at least). This Forbes article starts with information about a company, DeepNines, who is suing McAfee over a patent that covers combining an IDS and firewall in a single device. The patent was filed on May 17, 2000 and issued on June 6, 2006. Aside from the thousands of linux boxes configured as prior art (including several by me) and the fact that it took 6 years to issue the patent, DeepNines in a January 29, 2003 press release announced a partnership with McAfee to deliver just such integrated solutions.

The Forbes article then goes on to recount the coming apocalypse in the form of investment companies gathering billions of dollars exclusively to fund patent troll companies and lawsuits from such companies one of which is using innovative investment technique's to fund DeepNines in the above lawsuit against McAfee. Is this the end of the tech industry in the United States? Will we all have to move to Europe or Antigua to develop anything new? Will the US manage to drag the Europe into this IP cesspool leaving China, Russia and India as the tech innovators of the world?"
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greenbird greenbird writes  |  more than 7 years ago

greenbird (859670) writes "Techdirt has information from Daniel Berninger documenting prior art in the Verizon patents being used to destroy Vonage. So a successful company and possible an entire market may be undermined or destroyed by blatantly invalid patents. From the article:

"In particular, the claims in both patents were anticipated by open standards assembled by the VoIP Forum (H.323) in 1996 and published in January 1997 with the participation of members from Cisco Systems, Microsoft, IBM, Nortel, Intel, Motorola, Lucent, and Vocaltec Communications, among others."

and

"The Eric Voit patent applications reflect, in particular, contributions made by VocalTec Communication to the VoIP Forum during 1996 and formally published at the same time as a separate document.""

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