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Cisco Says Vegas Conference Attendees' Information Was Leaked

gregleimbeck Re:Competition? (97 comments)

"Business card like info"

more than 4 years ago

Submissions

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gregleimbeck gregleimbeck writes  |  more than 7 years ago

gregleimbeck writes "Spam volume soared another 35% in November, an e-mail security vendor said Thursday, and the month saw spam tactics that reduced the efficiency of traditional anti-spam filters. "There's been a huge increase in spam volume," says David Mayer, a product manager at IronPort Systems, "from 31 billion spams a day on average in October 2005 to 63 billion in October 2006. But in November, we saw two surges that averaged 85 billion messages a day, one from Nov. 13 to 22, the other from Nov. 26 to 28."
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gregleimbeck gregleimbeck writes  |  more than 7 years ago

gregleimbeck writes "An Atlanta company is cobbling together diverse software and hardware building blocks to create a $150 laptop computer that promises its users a common computing experience and avoids Microsoft software and name-brand PC processors like Intel and AMD. Called the "LiteComputer" by Lite Appliances, most of the pieces of the laptop have been developed and the firm hopes user models can be ready by mid-2007."
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gregleimbeck gregleimbeck writes  |  more than 7 years ago

gregleimbeck (975759) writes "Exploit code for a third, unpatched vulnerability in Microsoft Word has been posted on the Internet, adding to the software maker's struggles to keep up with gaping holes in its popular word processing program. The attack code, available at Milw0rm.com, contains sample Word documents that have been rigged to launch code execution exploits when the file is opened."
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gregleimbeck gregleimbeck writes  |  more than 7 years ago

gregleimbeck (975759) writes "http://www.techweb.com/showArticle.jhtml?articleID =196603174&cid=RSSfeed_TechWeb Microsoft has acknowledged another unpatched Microsoft Word bug, the second zero-day in six days, and confirmed that the vulnerability is being exploited by attackers. The newest flaw, said Scott Deacon of the Microsoft Security Response Center, is unrelated to the vulnerability disclosed last Tuesday, which also has been leveraged by attackers. "From the initial reports and investigation we can confirm that the vulnerability is being exploited on a very, very limited and targeted basis," wrote Deacon on the MSRC's blog. A successful attack, which would require a user to open a Word document attached to a malicious e-mail or download a Word file from a Web site, could completely compromise the PC. Word 2000, 2002, 2003, and Word Viewer 2003 are affected by the newest bug, added Deacon, although the just-released Word 2007 is not. Microsoft did not say whether the Mac versions of Word, which are susceptible to attack by last week's bug, are also impacted by this new flaw. McAfee reported that it has spotted attackers planting a password-stealing Trojan horse — "PWS-Agent.g" — using the newest Word exploit. The Trojan loots passwords from Internet Explorer, Firefox, and POP3 e-mail clients. Danish vulnerability tracker Secunia, meanwhile, ranked the second Word bug as "extremely critical," the same top-of-the-chart label as last week's flaw. According to Microsoft's advance notice of the patches it plans to release Tuesday, neither of the Word flaws will be fixed in December. Microsoft issues out-of-cycle security updates only infrequently; it has done so only twice thus far during 2006. Microsoft has acknowledged another unpatched Microsoft Word bug, the second zero-day in six days, and confirmed that the vulnerability is being exploited by attackers. The newest flaw, said Scott Deacon of the Microsoft Security Response Center, is unrelated to the vulnerability disclosed last Tuesday, which also has been leveraged by attackers. "From the initial reports and investigation we can confirm that the vulnerability is being exploited on a very, very limited and targeted basis," wrote Deacon on the MSRC's blog. A successful attack, which would require a user to open a Word document attached to a malicious e-mail or download a Word file from a Web site, could completely compromise the PC. Word 2000, 2002, 2003, and Word Viewer 2003 are affected by the newest bug, added Deacon, although the just-released Word 2007 is not. Microsoft did not say whether the Mac versions of Word, which are susceptible to attack by last week's bug, are also impacted by this new flaw. McAfee reported that it has spotted attackers planting a password-stealing Trojan horse — "PWS-Agent.g" — using the newest Word exploit. The Trojan loots passwords from Internet Explorer, Firefox, and POP3 e-mail clients. Danish vulnerability tracker Secunia, meanwhile, ranked the second Word bug as "extremely critical," the same top-of-the-chart label as last week's flaw. According to Microsoft's advance notice of the patches it plans to release Tuesday, neither of the Word flaws will be fixed in December. Microsoft issues out-of-cycle security updates only infrequently; it has done so only twice thus far during 2006."

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