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Comments

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Microsoft Announces Windows 10

guruevi Re: Unified Experience Across Devices (633 comments)

Windows 9x-ME was really Windows 4 all along. 2000 was version 5, XP-10 is version 6.

Most windows versions suck, regardless of version numbering. They suck less when it comes around to having a third service pack but they're still miles behind a real OS. (I haven't used windows computers at home since windows 3.11)

yesterday
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Not Just Netflix: Google Challenges Canada's Power To Regulate Online Video

guruevi Re:In US, restrictions based on finite RF frequenc (108 comments)

No, it means investing in better antenna equipment, I can get gigabit speeds on an unregulated frequency, a regulated frequency should be much easier. Japan has 100Mbps to individual mobile devices, setting up P2P wireless links is even easier. Even so, the country has paid said regulatory fees to ensure wired access to everyone.

3 days ago
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Not Just Netflix: Google Challenges Canada's Power To Regulate Online Video

guruevi Re:In US, restrictions based on finite RF frequenc (108 comments)

The 'spectrum' or bandwidth of the Internet is virtually unlimited though. You just need to put in bigger pipes and even the smallest of the pipes you can currently get at an IX (1Gbps) can easily carry 1000 simultaneous viewers.

The ISP's only have exclusive rights to the last mile because we (the people) let them. For the most part, "the people" paid over and over again for this last mile as well as all the other miles (both phone and cable) through regulatory fees but either is being monopolized by a single provider. There is no technical reason that several providers couldn't offer you the 'last mile' connection. It's being done in several European countries where you have a pick of providers to offer you the last mile.

about a week ago
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Do Specs Matter Anymore For the Average Smartphone User?

guruevi Because... (252 comments)

Because maintaining the status quo without innovating has worked out well for the consumers (eg. TI calculators)? Because what we need now is what we need in the future is for ISP's only?

You get better battery life AND increased specs to the crappy Nexus. Because your e-mail loads equally fast doesn't mean mine does (I have 10k+ messages in my inbox). Because you use your phone for simple games, doesn't mean I don't use it for viewing 3D brain scans.

about a week ago
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How Our Botched Understanding of "Science" Ruins Everything

guruevi Re:Science vs Faith (794 comments)

I used to be a preacher. I have studied various religions as part of my training to be a preacher. I changed my mind about my parental religion at great personal cost. I investigated other religious tenets (Christian and non-Christian) as various friends suggested they may be a 'better fit'.

If you're so wise, please tell me how religions are not trying to safeguard they're own individual collection of fables and myths?

about a week ago
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How Our Botched Understanding of "Science" Ruins Everything

guruevi Re:Science vs Faith (794 comments)

Why does your life or anything at all have to have meaning? In the grand scheme of things, your 1-in-a-billion life form on a speck of dust in the middle of an average galaxy is insignificant. Absence of proof does not mean we can just instantiate a random object to explain things (Bertrand Russell's teapot).

You can devise a scientific test for love if you define what love is. Enjoyment is also relatively easy to explain in regards brain chemistry. You are free to believe what you want but what is the meaning of believing something you can never know for sure?

about a week ago
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How Our Botched Understanding of "Science" Ruins Everything

guruevi Re:Science vs Faith (794 comments)

If you add them up together, they're total sum is 0, they don't come from anywhere and go nowhere. It's basic quantum mechanics. The entire summation of all energy within our Universe is 0.

about a week ago
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How Our Botched Understanding of "Science" Ruins Everything

guruevi Re:Science vs Faith (794 comments)

Not really, the why is not philosophical at all, it is testable and provable that the universe is big enough that random stuff, however remote the possibilities, happens all the time. The why and the how are identical from a scientific viewpoint, that's how science works. Scientists ask the why question and give a how answer.

about a week ago
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How Our Botched Understanding of "Science" Ruins Everything

guruevi Re:Science vs Faith (794 comments)

Time began with the Big Bang. There was no 'before' the Big Bang because time (as we know it) was not there (yet). Because the majority of people fails to understand the reasoning/math behind it doesn't make the theory invalid. We can measure this "mythical nothing", it's the same space between an atoms' nucleus and electron. There is a shit-ton of nothing, the majority of the Universe and everything that exists is "nothing". It may not make immediate sense to you but the Universe is not obligated to make something easier to comprehend, as long as the equations work out.

about a week ago
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How Our Botched Understanding of "Science" Ruins Everything

guruevi Re:Definition of religion (794 comments)

No, the reason we don't accept "my/your god did it" is because if we did, we would still be in the stone age. If your god is just a variable to make a balance sheet work out, then there is no reason to keep looking for the cause of that variable. If we said today: God + evolution = life then we have no reason to look at the chemical processes behind abiogenesis because "god" did it and it fits the equation.

The god of the gaps is just that, as soon as we are able to fill the gaps, your god will be gone, heck your god has already gone from encompassing the entire universe, planets, stars etc to only being an entity to explain abiogenesis (we solved the origin of the universe a while ago if you didn't catch it yet). In the mean time you are an ignorant fool because "god did it" is easier for you to accept than "we don't know yet".

If you were truly honest, you would explain your god and how he is able to fill these gaps. If you can't explain god, if it is not falsifiable and testable, then it is invalid.

about two weeks ago
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How Our Botched Understanding of "Science" Ruins Everything

guruevi Re:Science vs Faith (794 comments)

How is the process, why is the statistics. Why does our Universe exist? Because two particles chanced to meet. Why are we here? Because our species survived long enough for you to ask that question. And that is a better answer than a being that you cannot explain and is in itself contradictory. The Universe doesn't owe you an explanation and if there is no explanation, if it's just statistics, the why is just a pointless question. Fabricating a god because you are not satisfied that 'shit just happened to turn out well enough for you that you survived to ask the question' is disingenuous.

about two weeks ago
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How Our Botched Understanding of "Science" Ruins Everything

guruevi Re:Science vs Faith (794 comments)

Why can't science touch it? Lawrence Krauss has a pretty good explanation on how something came from nothing. It is falsifiable and testable, if it is wrong, he will gladly accept that.

If you have blind faith that your god exists, then you have no reason to look any further for any of the answers. Gods stop all invention, curiosity and reason because if "god" did it (which one btw?) then that is all the reason you need. Even if we don't know right now, nature through science has a much better answer for us and that answer will be much more beautiful and reasonable than "god".

about two weeks ago
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How Our Botched Understanding of "Science" Ruins Everything

guruevi Re:Science vs Faith (794 comments)

So why does the universe exist? Science tells us why (read an astrophysics text book) and it has very good reasoning and experimentation to back it up. Religions tell us 1000's of other answers which do not resemble either the scientific reason nor each other... so which one am I supposed to trust?

Even if all we had was a computer model that told us perhaps this is "why" the universe exists at all today, it's better than any religious answer I've ever heard. Religion is a business trying to safeguard a collection of fables and myths in order to sell you something that doesn't exist and won't help you in the slightest.

about two weeks ago
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Nobody's Neutral In Net Neutrality Debate

guruevi There is no "controversy" (132 comments)

In the 90's we (the tech-geeky people that had been on the Internet since the 80's) were telling everyone including the FCC that within a decade we would be streaming live and on-demand high-definition video over the Internet. At that point we were already doing it with audio (Net2Phone, SIP, MP3, Napster, Icecast, ...) We even formulated protocols for it and reserved space in the IPv4 range for things like broadcast and multicast (and multicast works incredibly well for distribution).

The problem is that neither the FCC, Congress nor anyone that was able to put pressure on the ISP's made sure that the ISP's kept up with the advances in technology. I moved to where I live now almost a decade ago and I still have the same amount of bandwidth than I did back then. TWC/Comcast, AT&T and others haven't upgraded their base broadband speeds since the early 2000's. DSL in most of the US is stuck at ~2Mbps, Cable at 10Mbps. In the mean time the world has moved on to 100Mbps and 1Gbps being 'normal' for respectively DSL and Cable. Heck, these days I can get satellite at the same speeds and cost (longer delays though) than Cable and DSL.

about two weeks ago
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Apple Will No Longer Unlock Most iPhones, iPads For Police

guruevi Re:Sanity... (504 comments)

The government must have reasonable cause or even be able to prove that incriminating evidence is indeed on said device or in said location. They can't just say "we want to see whether or not there is evidence there".

about two weeks ago
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FCC Chairman: Americans Shouldn't Subsidize Internet Service Under 10Mbps

guruevi Re:10Mbps is still slow (353 comments)

30 years ago we did 10Mbps on coax. Cable TV is pushing out 100's of channels on copper, several digital for a bandwidth of several 100Mbps. Heck, twisted pair has that much bandwidth.

about two weeks ago
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Commander Keen: Keen Dreams Source Code Released

guruevi Re:Work has a new owner (72 comments)

It probably does but it's released under GPL so it doesn't matter. This is why we should release everything under GPL/CC-type licenses.

about two weeks ago
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ISIS Bans Math and Social Studies For Children

guruevi US is next? (981 comments)

This is what happens when you let the religious right run a country. Doesn't matter whether they're Islamic, Christian or something else.

about two weeks ago
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Logitech Aims To Control the Smart Home

guruevi Re:One ring to rule them all? (115 comments)

They'd rather jack up your utility bill. The utilities cranking up your AC would require them to invest in the network to support said cranking. They'll give you a 'smart' meter that counts kWh's with a fork.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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What is the best starter guide/book for beginning with OOP

guruevi guruevi writes  |  more than 2 years ago

guruevi writes "A (girl)friend of mine just started a CS course and has been dumped head first into programming with Java.

The textbook sucks in my not-so-humble opinion, the teacher just glossed over the theory, didn't really explain anything other than "just do this and it will work" (until yesterday she had no idea as to what String[] args means in the main and why it should or shouldn't be there) and has given them only a few class methods to implement, feeding them the main and tester classes so far then skipped straight ahead to "now implement the main, this class and the tester" leaving (at least one of) his pupils bewildered as to what it actually all means.

Yes, she can parrot what an object is and a string or an integer and how to write it up but she has no idea how it fits together. Constructor methods same problem, parrot the theory but no idea what it actually means and how object oriented programming makes things look different than the methodical sequential programming people are geared towards thinking.

Since I am an already somewhat seasoned programmer I can explain what everything means and it feels very natural after years of experience but I'm not a great teacher. I also like to introduce what is and isn't good practice (and where her teacher goes horribly wrong is teaching good practice such as commenting, variable naming etc.) but it all gets overwhelming for her.

Since I am not really familiar with Java (more of a P*/C/ObjC/C++ guy) I am looking for either a good guide on Java or any objective oriented programming for beginners, something where people can understand how methods/functions work, how variables are passed and what scoping means (things the textbook doesn't explain until a few chapters later, it just assumes the pupil to copy the examples)"
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BREIN removes data from seized hard drives

guruevi guruevi writes  |  more than 3 years ago

guruevi writes "In January BREIN (the Dutch counterpart to the RIAA) illegally seized 8 servers from a hosting provider. In order to get the servers back, BREIN and the hosting provider reached a settlement where all servers would be returned but 4 servers BREIN claims hosted illegal websites would be completely erased. The other 4 hosted administrative data of the hosting company.

According to BREIN, the servers hosted illegal top sites (sites where data is shared among releasers, not end-users) but the owner of the servers and the hosting provider denies the allegation, the company that owned the websites that were hosted on the servers went into bankruptcy in the mean time.

BREIN settled before a judge could review the case and in return for the servers and in order not to prolong the impact on his business made the owner agree to a gag order as well. According to Tim Kuik, proprietor of BREIN, "we got exactly what we wanted" and calls the opponents lawyers a "bad loser"."

Link to Original Source
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SABAM wants truckers to pay for listening to radio

guruevi guruevi writes  |  more than 3 years ago

guruevi writes "SABAM, the Belgian RIAA wants truckers to start paying for the copyrights to listen to the radio in their cabin. SABAM already has a system in place to extract fees from businesses for having radio's in the work area for businesses with more than 9 employees and they find that truckers' cabins are areas of work and thus infringe on their copyrights. The local politicians think this is going too far, they believe truckers need a radio for safety reasons and view a truck cabin as 'an intimate place'.

Can you come up with other places to extract music copyright remittances? Maybe you may want to pay taxes every time you take a dump as your gas may form a tune."

Link to Original Source
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SourceForge password sniffing or is it phishing?

guruevi guruevi writes  |  more than 3 years ago

guruevi (827432) writes "I just received this e-mail apparently from SourceForge asking me to change the password on their site. Off course since there were password sniffing attempts I can't be too sure that this is a legitimate e-mail or whether or not the code behind it is safe to use. Maybe I'm getting phished based on my account data?

This is their e-mail:

Hello,

We recently experienced a directed attack on SourceForge infrastructure (http://sourceforge.net/blog/sourceforge-net-attack/) and so we are resetting all passwords in the sf.net database — just in case. We're e-mailing all sf.net registered account holders to let you know about this change to your account.

Our investigation uncovered evidence of password sniffing attempts. We have no evidence to suggest that your password has been compromised. But, what we definitely don't want is to find out in 2 months that passwords were compromised and we didn't take action.

So, as a proactive measure we've invalidated your SourceForge.net account password. To access the site again, you'll need to go through the email
recovery process and choose a shiny new password:

https://sourceforge.net/account/registration/recover.php

If you need help with this, feel free to e-mail us:

sfnet_ops@geek.net

We appreciate your patience with us as we work to respond to this attack. We'll be working through the weekend to get things back to normal as quickly as possible.

Watch for updates on the service outages on our blog:

http://sourceforge.net/blog/

Thank you,

The SourceForge Team"

Link to Original Source
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First known binary star is a sextuplet system

guruevi guruevi writes  |  more than 4 years ago

guruevi writes "The two stars named Alcor and Mizar, sometimes also called "Horse and Rider" can be seen with the naked eye and has been thought to be a binary system since ancient times. Using his telescope, Galileo documented Mizar to be itself a pair of binaries with later discoveries in spectroscopy showing it was actually four stars orbiting each other. However an astronomer at the University of Rochester made the discovery that Alcor is actually two stars and it is apparently gravitationally bound to the Mizar system making the whole group a sextuplet.

The discovery is surprising since Alcor is one of the most studied stars in the sky. Eric Mamajek, assistant professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Rochester, and leader of the team that found the star says "We were trying a new method of planet hunting and instead of finding a planet orbiting Alcor, we found a star." The star seems to be a cool and dim M-class dwarf star."

Link to Original Source
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Brain Separates Living and Non-Living Objects

guruevi guruevi writes  |  more than 5 years ago

guruevi writes "For unknown reasons, the human brain distinctly separates the handling of images of living things from images of non-living things, processing each image type in a different area of the brain. For years, many scientists have assumed the brain segregated visual information in this manner to optimize processing the images themselves, but new research shows that even in people who have been blind since birth the brain still separates the concepts of living and non-living objects.

The research, published in today's issue of Neuron, implies that the brain categorizes objects based on the different types of subsequent consideration they demand — such as whether an object is edible, or is a landmark on the way home, or is a predator to run from. They are not categorized entirely by their appearance.
"If both sighted people and people with blindness process the same ideas in the same parts of the brain, then it follows that visual experience is not necessary in order for those aspects of brain organization to develop," says Bradford Mahon, postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at the University of Rochester, and lead author of the study. "We think this means significant parts of the brain are innately structured around a few domains of knowledge that were critical in humans' evolutionary history."

Previous studies have shown that the sight of certain objects, such as a table or mountain, activate regions of the brain other than does the sight of living objects, such as an animal or face — but why the brain would choose to process these two categories differently has remained a mystery, says Mahon. Since the regions were known to activate when the objects were seen, scientists wondered if something about the visual appearance of the objects determined how the brain would process them. For instance, says Mahon, most living things have curved forms, and so many scientists thought the brain prefers to processes images of living things in an area that is optimized for curved forms.

I just wonder where zombies and the undead would appear on your fMRI."

Link to Original Source
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Regular Light Bulbs Made Super-Efficient

guruevi guruevi writes  |  more than 5 years ago

guruevi writes "An ultra-powerful laser can turn regular incandescent light bulbs into power-sippers, say optics researchers at the University of Rochester. The process could make a light as bright as a 100-watt bulb consume less electricity than a 60-watt bulb while remaining far cheaper and radiating a more pleasant light than a fluorescent bulb can.

The key to creating the super-filament is an ultra-brief, ultra-intense beam of light called a femtosecond laser pulse. The laser burst lasts only a few quadrillionths of a second. During its brief burst, Guo's laser unleashes as much power as the entire grid of North America onto a spot the size of a needle point. That intense blast forces the surface of the metal to form nanostructures and microstructures that dramatically alter how efficiently can radiate from the filament.

In 2006, Guo and his assistant, Anatoliy Vorobeyv, used a similar laser process to turn any metal pitch black as reported on Slashdot. The surface structures created on the metal were incredibly effective at capturing incoming radiation, such as light.

Guo's team has even been able to make a filament radiate partially polarized light, which until now has been impossible to do without special filters that reduce the bulb's efficiency. By creating nanostructures in tight, parallel rows, some light that emits from the filament becomes polarized. Guo is also announcing this month in Applied Physics Letters a technique using a similar femtosecond laser process to make a piece of metal automatically move liquid around its surface, even lifting a liquid up against gravity."

Link to Original Source
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Pure IPTV providers in the US

guruevi guruevi writes  |  more than 5 years ago

guruevi writes "We currently have Time Warner Cable in our area but no viable competitors. We have no FiOS, we have no decent DSL (unless you call 512/128 good, we have no U-Verse. We only have TWC for Cable and High-Speed Internet or DirectTV for Sattelite. TWC knows this and thus can charge anything for no service. Currently we were forced in their All-In-One package since it is cheaper than buying just cable and internet from them. Recently the quality of the basic cable (analog) offer has been degrading to the point that there is visible pixelation and the color has been degraded to something that looks like 256 color VGA (looks like a 90's era compressed DivX) especially during peak hours. This is (I think) done to save on bandwidth since they are offering more HD and On-Demand channels and a whopping 10MBps Internet (Turbo Boost).

So I wanted to switch to digital and HD since it's supposed to be better, we payed for HD service and were forced to rent their DVR with it (they don't offer HD service without). Not a problem, the channels are decent. Now we want a second television so I have an HD television but you can't receive their HD channels without a DVR since they are all encrypted. No problem I think, I plug into the Firewire plugs on the back of the DVR which are supposed to be able to tune the box and stream it over the network using MythTV however these plugs have been (illegally or intentionally) disabled. Calling TWC doesn't help, they don't want to ship me a DVR with the plugs enabled nor do they want to ship me a cable box that can decode the HD service I'm paying for. The only solution they have is to pay for another DVR box ($120 for the box + $120 installation) and rental (~$20/month for the box + $4/month for the remote (no kidding) + taxes and fees). CableCard has recently been discontinued on the network so I can't buy a TiVo.

I think the best solution in my situation would be to dump TWC all together for cable and switch to a pure IPTV provider. The problem is however, I found a few IPTV providers outside the US (Israel, China, India, Europe, ...) that offer some type of TV channel offer (either with or without a set top box) but I can't find any that offer the US. I don't need local channels however I would like to have at least NBC (although I can get that over antenna), ABC, A&E, Discovery, Comedy Channel etc. Ideally I would be able to integrate an IPTV offer in my MythTV setup but it's not a requirement. I am more than happy to pay for a set top box rental or pre-paid as long as I can get some decent service for a decent price. My bandwidth is good and stable enough for certain HD channels (they are currently already compressed with TWC and I can stream 720p QuickTime) and I can always upgrade my bandwidth from the current 3 Mbps. Anybody that tried out some good providers or content distributors and had good results?"
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Scientist forced to remove prediction was right

guruevi guruevi writes  |  more than 5 years ago

guruevi writes "It seems that the scientist that was forced to remove his prediction about earthquakes in the L'Aquilla region was right after all. According to CNN up to 150 people have lost their life in that region because of a powerful earthquake. No word yet from the news tickers on what became of the bully that censored this scientist because of the 'panic' he started."
Link to Original Source
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Apple silently introduces new iPod Touch

guruevi guruevi writes  |  more than 5 years ago

guruevi writes "Apparently Apple has really stopped introducing stuff at big events and are silently introducing products on their website without much fanfare as seen with Safari 4 Beta.

The new iPod Touch (http://store.apple.com/us/browse/home/shop_ipod/) has a shiny metal backplate (compared to the previous all-plastic one) and comes into it's previous 8GB and 16GB versions as well as a (new) 32GB version and seems to be marketed towards handheld gaming."

Link to Original Source
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DRM-free iTunes also means increase in pricing

guruevi guruevi writes  |  more than 5 years ago

guruevi writes "Apple just announced that all iTunes songs will soon be available in DRM-free format. The concession for this will be the 3-tier pricing structure. Now the media generators finally got it's much wanted price increase. Songs will now be available for USD 0.69, USD 0.99 or USD 1.29. Other announcements from the company were a new (expected) MacBook 17" and new versions of iWork and iLife. Online versions of iWork are also going to become fee-based and Keynote Remote is going to cost money as well. Does giving up Steve Jobs as Apple's main man also mean giving up the set, relatively low prices of it's services?"
Link to Original Source
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Controversial wiretap law passed through the House

guruevi guruevi writes  |  more than 6 years ago

guruevi writes "The controversial wiretap law which has had quite some coverage here on Slashdot and created an outcry with people concerned about their privacy has finally been passed through the House and is now going to the Senate. The law will grant retroactive immunity to the telecom industry which has aided the Bush Administration and 3-letter agencies with illegal wiretaps and will legalize such wiretaps.

For future wiretaps, the new measure would require a special court set up under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act to approve any effort to spy on Americans. Authorities could act for up to seven days before seeking a warrant — more than twice the three-day emergency period under the current secret laws and courts.

The House vote was 293-129, with 188 Republicans and 105 Democrats voting for it. One Republican voted against the measure.

Bush said the legislation will "allow our intelligence professionals to quickly and effectively monitor the plans of terrorists abroad while protecting the liberties of Americans here at home." He's also fearmongering by saying that 'the enemy' that attacked us at 9/11 will attack again and this legislation will allow

Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Jay Rockefeller, D-West Virginia, said the bill would prevent administration officials from conducting any new warrantless surveillance. House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Maryland, said the new plan is "not perfect" but "strikes a sound balance" between intelligence-gathering and civil liberties.

Rep. Pete Hoekstra of Michigan, the ranking Republican on the House Intelligence Committee, said the intelligence community depends on "the backing of patriotic private companies."

"The telecom companies simply have to produce a piece of paper we already know exists, resulting in immediate dismissal," said Caroline Fredrickson, the head of the ACLU's Washington legislative office. She said the bill "does nothing to keep Americans safe and is a constitutional farce.""

Link to Original Source
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Anonymous Coward steals data of 6m Chili's

guruevi guruevi writes  |  more than 6 years ago

guruevi writes "Slashdot's most favorite poster, the one and only with uid 666, Anonymous Coward stole personal data of 6 million Chileans — reportedly including a daughter of the president — and posted it briefly on the Internet, authorities said Sunday. The hacker said he intended "to demonstrate how poorly protected the data in Chile is, and how nobody works to protect it."

Police Chief Jaime Jara confirmed that authorities were investigating the theft of the leaked data, which he said included identity card numbers, addresses, telephone numbers, e-mails and academic background. The data is currently offline but it could have been downloaded by some visitors. Torrent anyone?"

Link to Original Source
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Researchers compress 20s of music onto 1kb

guruevi guruevi writes  |  more than 6 years ago

guruevi writes "Researchers at the University of Rochester have digitally reproduced music in a file nearly 1,000 times smaller than a regular MP3 file. The music, a 20-second clarinet solo, is encoded in less than a single kilobyte, and is made possible by two innovations: recreating in a computer both the real-world physics of a clarinet and the physics of a clarinet player.

A comparison of samples of both reproductions (MP3 and this new algorithm) can be heard on the site.

Apparently they sample all physics that interact with the clarinet at speeds a human can produce (as opposed to sampling the sound it produces thousands of times per second) and then reproduce the sound. I don't know if this would be similar to MIDI but according to the researchers, even the human voice could be synthesized this way."

Link to Original Source
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The 'Planet' in Planetary Nebulae

guruevi guruevi writes  |  more than 6 years ago

guruevi writes "Astronomers at the University of Rochester, have announced that low-mass stars and possibly even super-Jupiter-sized planets may be responsible for creating some of the most breathtaking objects in the sky.

The news is ironic because the name "planetary" nebula has always been a misnomer. When these objects were discovered 300 years ago, astronomers couldn't tell what they were and named them for their resemblance to the planet Uranus. But as early as the mid-19th century, astronomers realized these objects are really great clouds of dust emitted by dying stars.

Now, researchers have found that planets or low-mass stars orbiting these aged stars may indeed be pivotal to the creation of the nebulae's fantastic appearance. Pretty pictures and more information in the link."

Link to Original Source
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Is Apple becoming shy of the spotlight?

guruevi guruevi writes  |  more than 6 years ago

guruevi writes "We've all come to know the big releases of Apple through Steve Jobs' typical keynote in black turtleneck and jeans. Lately however, more and more products have come to the daylight without the big announcements, without the keynote, without Steve? Recent releases include the new XServe and the replacement of the XServe RAID with Promise gear, the 2GB iPod Shuffle, Pink iPods, Aperture 2 and today the new Macbook models featuring faster processors, multi-touch touchpads and NVIDIA chipsets. Is Steve on his way out? Is this a change in future direction for Apple? Or is Apple working on something so much better for their next keynote?"
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Apple drops XServe RAID, continues with Promise

guruevi guruevi writes  |  more than 6 years ago

guruevi writes "When I went to configure a server today on the Apple Store, I couldn't find their XServe RAID systems anymore. Apple released Xsan 2 today but silently they also replaced the XServe RAID, Apple's in-house PATA-based RAID solution with a Promise VTrak E-Class RAID Subsystem which can seat up to sixteen 750GB 7200-rpm SATA or 300GB 15,000-rpm SAS drives for up to 12TB of raw capacity. These solutions come in at $11999 for 8x 750G SATA drives, $14999 for 12TB and $18999 for 4,8TB of SAS drives spinning at 15,000 rpm So no more nicely brushed aluminum storage enclosures, hopefully they are just as simple to maintain."
Link to Original Source
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TSA testers slip fake bombs through security

guruevi guruevi writes  |  more than 6 years ago

guruevi writes "But apparently it's not all that difficult. According to the CNN writeup, about 60%-75% of tests fail (as in, the investigators successfully slip through security successfully with a potential bomb. This doesn't inspire much confidence in the TSA security systems which have become more of an annoyance ever since 9/11 to any Slashdot and non-Slashdot reading traveller. This particular investigator actually has a bomb strapped to his back, gets a pat down because of a metal leg and gets away with telling it's a back support. Scary or common knowledge?"
Link to Original Source
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Hip-Hop and Cell Phones Attract Girls to Science

guruevi guruevi writes  |  more than 6 years ago

guruevi writes "In order to attract girls to Science, seventh and eighth grade girls from Wilson Foundation Academy will be searching for real scientific answers to questions on topics that interest them most. As part of Science STARS (Students Tackling Authentic and Relevant Science), an after-school program at the University of Rochester's Warner School of Education, middle school girls will investigate how hip-hop dance affects balance coordination and reaction time, what the impact of hairstyling products on hair is and how cell phones distract us through everyday usage. So is this just going to be a fad or will girls really be attracted and make the 'science choice' later in life by these type of programs?"
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"Electromagnetic Wormhole" with Invisibili

guruevi guruevi writes  |  more than 6 years ago

guruevi writes "Allan Greenleaf, professor of mathematics, and others at the University of Rochester first created the mathematics behind the "invisibility cloak" announced last October. In a study in the Oct. 12 Physical Review Letters, the team has now shown that the same technology could be used to generate an "electromagnetic wormhole".

"Imagine wrapping Harry Potter's invisibility cloak around a tube," says Greenleaf. "If the material is designed according to our specifications, you could pass an object into one end, watch it disappear as it traveled the length of the tunnel, and then see it reappear out the other end."

More information and pictures can be found here: http://www.rochester.edu/news/show.php?id=3012 The University of Rochester (www.rochester.edu) is one of the nation's leading private universities."

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