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Windows 10: Can Microsoft Get It Right This Time?

hackingbear Nothing beats 10 (489 comments)

because Windows 10 == Windows X

about two weeks ago
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Gmail Access Starts To Come Back In China, State-Run Paper Blames Google

hackingbear Too big to fail (45 comments)

It is likely the too big to fail at play. Gmail is used by lots of people and companies. When you are too big, government will have to keep you running by either not hurting you or, as in the US, by rescuing you.

about a month ago
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Serious Economic Crisis Looms In Russia, China May Help

hackingbear Re:China has to buy US bonds ... (265 comments)

They mangage/manipulate their currency so that there is effectively a huge discount to all products and services in China.

That's a myth as pointed out in my summary. Back in early 1990's the official rate was something like 1 USD to 3 RMB but the black market rate was 1:8. Nobody would bring their USDs to the bank to get Yuan; instead they all found black market source to get more Yuan. Eventually, the Chinese government realized they couldn't pop up the Yuan and so let it fall to the black market rate. Currently, the black market rate is the same as the official rate. If it is really undervalued, I would think the black market would reflect that. In China, always look at the black market first.

about a month ago
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Human Clinical Trials To Begin On Drug That Reverses Diabetes In Animal Models

hackingbear Re: Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes? (140 comments)

from the reading of the article, it seems to work for Type 2 too but their research for now only test for Type 1? Would anyone venture to think why this will or will not work for type 2? (try to see if this will help my folk who has type 2.)

about 3 months ago
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ChickTech Brings Hundreds of Young Women To Open Source

hackingbear Here's a better name (158 comments)

Chick Squad

about 6 months ago
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China Starts Outsourcing From ... the US

hackingbear Re:This could be political too (274 comments)

That's because Chinese people are complaining loudly that their government is too soft. (don't believe? read the Chinese news portals' user comments for some days.)

And, we are indeed very very good at soft power -- it is known as political marketing.

about 7 months ago
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Cisco Spending Millions of Dollars Secretly Purchasing New Juniper Products

hackingbear but they complaint others doing the same thing to (120 comments)

Huawei was accused of pretty much the same thing by the US companies/gov't. Looks like not a Chinese exclusive, but it is OK that we do this.

about 8 months ago
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San Francisco's Housing Crisis Explained

hackingbear Re:Simple problem, simple solution (359 comments)

NIMBY is an unavoidable phenomena in advanced economy. With enforcement of environment protection laws, you can be sure of hazard over development and pollution, like in China for up to now. Then once it became a significant problem, people would rise up and complaint and started creating/enforcing environment laws -- China is now at this stage. Then once there are sufficient laws, some people will then start abusing the laws to protect their own interest, thus NIMBY -- even China now has had quite many large scale protests against building chemical factories in their neighborhoods.

Can people stay the middle way and be rational? No, and will never. The two extremes will have to fight and the pendulum will swing back and forth. That's why the Yin-Yang symbol is not gray colored but spinning black and white. Therefore, there is nothing to worry about. People will fight their way to balance in the long term.

about 9 months ago
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Turing Award Goes To Distributed Computing Wrangler Leslie Lamport

hackingbear FIRST POST (40 comments)

my request counter is 0!

about 10 months ago
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Google Buys Home Automation Company Nest

hackingbear Re:I'll be keeping mine (257 comments)

All EULA also contains clauses like "We can change the terms of this agreement at will." And once it got enough penetration, a letter/email looking a like a junk will be sent to you inbox/mailbox with a lengthy legal statement of the changes and guaranteed 99% will not ever read and remaining 99% will not care a damn thing.

In this country, we cook you like frog in slow cooker powered by fine prints.

1 year,15 days
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Researchers Find Some Volcanoes 'Scream' At Increasing Pitches Until They Blow

hackingbear and also (59 comments)

some volcanoes will erect before they blow.

about a year and a half ago
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Can OpenStack Avoid Fragmentation In China?

hackingbear Motive? (42 comments)

Fragmenting an existing standard creates a new standard that can draw in $$$. Everything else, national security, national pride, etc., are just excused to rip public funds. US or China.

and isn't open source meant to encourage such -- can you count how many Linux distributions out there?

about a year and a half ago
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China Environment Ministry Calls Itself One of Four Worst Departments In World

hackingbear Re:What About the Ministry of Censorship? (126 comments)

If sina.com (and online news portals sohu.com and netease.com which all carry the same piece) are not major Chinese news sources, I don't know what can be. Further the original sina.com link is contributed by Globe Times which is a subsidiary of People's Daily and is considered more pro-government than its parent. PD's website also carries the same news. And why is the re-posting of BBC article even logically relevant to this discussion of censorship here?

Clearly another victim of Department of Education!

about a year and a half ago
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China Environment Ministry Calls Itself One of Four Worst Departments In World

hackingbear Re:What About the Ministry of Censorship? (126 comments)

Surely the Environmental Ministry cannot be as harmful as the Chinese Ministry preventing this quote from being carried in Xinhua, China Daily or any major news source in China?
[...]
Solve your censorship problem and you will solve a lot of your other problems. Just be prepared to see high turnover in your leadership -- something that has been needed for a very long time in China.

Let me guess which ministry you are referring to...

Ah, must be the U.S. Department of Education. Since it obvious doesn't teach you Chinese and consequently causing you unable to
  read this same news in Chinese news and make up false conclusion.

about a year and a half ago
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Did Internet Sales Tax Backers Bribe Congress? (Video)

hackingbear Will stop blowing my nose (317 comments)

Yet Jeff Flake (R-AZ), he received $588,966 $2,800 - a staggering 200x in favor, and voted "NO".

Mark Kirk (R-IL) $1,076,621to $28,200 or some 35x in favor, another "NO" vote.

Dear Donor,

Thank you for your generous checks! As promised, I will not blow my nose (we call it filibustering) during the public performance of our Circus, even though I have an impressively long nose longer than that of Pinocchio's, so that the Donkeys can pass your bill. But I will immediately blame the Donkeys for passing the bill. Don't worry. That won't hurt your bill a bit. I just do it to entice other of my donors to continue to write checks to me.

Thanks again for your generous checks! Keep in touch.

Sincerely,

The Elephants

about a year and a half ago
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Did Internet Sales Tax Backers Bribe Congress? (Video)

hackingbear Re:Huh? (317 comments)

Yet Jeff Flake (R-AZ), he received $588,966 $2,800 - a staggering 200x in favor, and voted "NO".

Mark Kirk (R-IL) $1,076,621to $28,200 or some 35x in favor, another "NO" vote.

But maybe 200X got them not to start filibuster the bill? If you don't pay enough, the R will filibuster to block it; if you do pay enough, the R will not filibuster but blame the D.

about a year and a half ago
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Noodle Robots Replacing Workers In Chinese Restaurants

hackingbear Re:Note on the noodle (531 comments)

Correct. Wait until robots can do ramen (pulled noodles, as in the original meaning of the word.) That's what a real human noodle maker will do in China to be employable.

about 2 years ago

Submissions

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China opens door for full foreign ownership of e-commerce companies

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about two weeks ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "Shanghai's Free Trade Zone entered a new dimension of economic reform on 14 January, allowing foreign investors to fully own e-commerce companies, according to Chinese state-owned media Xinhua News Agency. Previously, foreign investors originally needed a Chinese partner to break into the online shopping market, and were only allowed to have a maximum of 55 percent stake. Currently, the zone, set to be replicated in three other cities, is home to more than 12,000 companies, including 1,677 foreign-funded firms. The Chinese e-retail market is lucrative, with 330 million online shoppers and a trade volume of 5.66 trillion yuan ($910 billion) in the first half of 2014."
Link to Original Source
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China Vows to Help Russia, Aiming at World Dominance

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about a month ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "Two Chinese ministers offered support for Russia as President Vladimir Putin seeks to shore up the plummeting ruble without depleting foreign-exchange reserves which is already the largest in the world. Commerce Minister Gao Hucheng said expanding a currency swap between the two nations and making increased use of yuan for bilateral trade would have the greatest impact in aiding Russia. Western governments and experts have been criticizing China for restricting exchange and suppressing the value of its currency, even though anyone who lived in China during the 1990's knew that the value of Yuan was cut to align the same as in the (vibrant) black market that is still thriving. But as grandma has warned us, be careful of what we wish for. China has recently greatly sped up the relaxation of currency exchange and is promoting the yuan as an alternative to the dollar for global trade and finance and has signed currency-swap agreements with 28 other central banks to encourage this. Once accomplished, back by China's growing military might, Renminbi would be a formidable competitor to U.S. Dollar and which means U.S. wouldn't borrow almost freely from the world and our state of finance would be like that of Greece."
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China Plans Superheavy Rocket, Ups Reliability

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about 1 month ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "China is conducting preliminary research on a super-heavy launch vehicle that will be used in its manned missions to the moon. Liang Xiaohong, deputy head of the China Academy of Launch Vehicle Technology, disclosed that the Long March-9 is planned to have a maximum payload of 130 tons and its first launch will take place around 2028, comparable to US's SLS Block II in terms of capability and likely beating its schedule. The China National Space Administration has started preliminary research for the Mars exploration program and is persuading the government to include the project into the country's space agenda, according to Tian Yulong, secretary-general of the administration. Separately, China's Long March series of rocket has completed the 200th flight on Dec 7. It took 37 years to complete the first 100 flights but only 7 years for the second 100 flights. In addition, it claims (link in Chinese) a success rate of 98%, on par with EU's and beating US's 97% and Russia's 93% success rates."
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Chinese CEO Said Free Is the Right Price for Mobile Software

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about 2 months ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "Sheng Fu, CEO of Cheetah Mobile, a public Chinese mobile software company you probably haven't heard of but have top downloaded products in Android markets around the world, said that the intense competition of the Chinese market leads to products that can compete globally. There are so many recent university graduates working in tech, all with their startups looking to find their place in the market, he said. Chinese companies saw the impact that piracy played in the PC software era, and China’s mobile companies grew up knowing they would need to make money without getting consumers to open their wallets. “Chinese companies are so good at making free but high-quality products,” he said. Sounds like we have a good race to the bottom."
Link to Original Source
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Alibaba Turned 1111 Into $$$$

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about 3 months ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "Bummed that you're home alone on date night, or stuck in your mom's basement, yet again? Don't worry. A new gadget or some scuba gear could help. Observed on November 11 — or "11.11," for the date with the most 1s — Singles Day, which started out as a joke among a group of male college students attending Nanjing University in the 1990s, has become the world's biggest online shopping day, thanks to the e-commerce prowess of China's Alibaba Group, which on this day last year, sold twice what all US companies sold on Black Friday and Cyber Monday combined. This year, Alibaba has decided to take its 11.11 promotions worldwide, highlighting global brands including online jewelry store Blue Nile, clothing brand Juicy Couture, and even Costco. Amazon has tried to get a piece of the action. The Seattle-based company launched promotions for the holiday last year on its Chinese site, and it's done so again this year."
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China To Merge High-Speed Train Makers to Cut Competition

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about 3 months ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "China has two high-speed train makers, the China Northern Railcar Corp. (CNR) and China Southern Railcar Corp. (CSR). Despite both being state-owned companies, the two are really competing with each other in the international high-speed train market, undercutting prices. Now, the Chinese government is set to fix that by asking the two to merge. Such a deal also would raise questions about China’s determination to enforce monopoly laws that have been under a microscope in recent months as foreign companies including dairy makers, car makers including Volkswagen AG ’s Audi and technology companies Microsoft Corp. and Qualcomm Corp. have been investigated by antitrust authorities. However, as we haven't been complaining about China's ow prices hurting our business, shouldn't China raising the price be good for other train makers?"
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China Bans "Human Fresh Searching"

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about 4 months ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "The Supreme People’s Court, China's top court, has outlined the liabilities of network service providers in a document on the handling of online personal rights violation cases. “Rights violators usually hide in the dark online. They post harmful information out of the blue, and victims just can’t be certain whom they should accuse when they want to bring the case to court,” said Yao Hui, a senior SPC judge specializing in civil cases. Those re-posting content that violates others’ rights and interests will also answer for their actions, and their liability will be determined based on the consequences of their posts, the online influence of re-posters, and whether they make untruthful changes to content that mislead. This essentially tries to ban the so-called human flesh searching. Though this does not stop others from using the chance to highlight the country's censorship problems even though the rulings seem to focus on personal privacy protection."
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Dramatic Shifts in Manufacturing Costs Are Driving Companies to US, Mexico

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about 5 months ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "According to the new Boston Consulting Group Global Manufacturing Cost-Competitiveness Index, the often perceived as low-cost manufacturing nations — such as China, Brazil, Russia, and the Czech Republic — are no longer much cheaper than the U.S. In some cases, they are estimated to be even more expensive. Chinese manufacturing wages have nearly quintupled since 2004, while Mexican wages have risen by less than 50 percent in U.S. dollar terms, contrary to our long-standing misconception that their labors were being slaved. In the same period, the U.S. wage is essentially flat, whereas Mexican wages have risen only 67%. Not all countries are taking full advantage of their low-cost advantages, however. The report found that global competiveness in manufacturing is undermined in nations such as India and Indonesia by several factors, including logistics, the overall ease of doing business, and inflexible labor markets."
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China Starts Outsourcing from ... the U.S.

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about 7 months ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "Burdened with Alabama's highest unemployment rate, long abandoned by textile mills and furniture plants, Wilcox County, Alabama, desperately needs jobs. And the jobs are coming from China. Henan's Golden Dragon Precise Copper Tube Group opened a plant here last month, employing 300 locals. Chinese companies invested a record $14 billion in the United States last year, according to the Rhodium Group research firm. Collectively, they employ more than 70,000 Americans, up from virtually none a decade ago. Powerful forces — narrowing wage gaps (Chinese wages have been doubling every few years), tumbling U.S. energy prices, the rising Yuan — up 30% over the decade — are pulling Chinese companies across the Pacific. Perhaps very soon, Chinese workers will start protesting their jobs being outsourced to the cheap labors in the U.S."
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China Leads in Graphene Patent Applications

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about 7 months ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "According to British patent consultancy CambridgeIP, China has filed for more than 2,200 graphene patents, the most of any country, followed by the U.S. with more than 1,700 patents, and South Korea with just under 1,200 patents. In terms of institutions, Samsung, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, and IBM lead the way of number of patent filing on this futurist materials with seemingly unlimited potentials, followed by Qinghua University of China. As China's moving its economy to be more innovation based and strengthening its IP laws, American companies will perhaps soon be at the receiving ends of frivolous patent law suits."
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Chinese Man on Trial for Spreading False Rumours Online

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about 10 months ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "Qin Zhihui, a user of the Chinese Twitter-like website Weibo, has confessed in court to spreading false rumors about the Chinese government in the first public trial under a Chinese crackdown on online rumors. China has threatened criminal penalties against anyone who spreads rumors on microblogs that are reposted more than 500 times, or seen by more than 5,000 users. Qin invented a story that the government gave 200m yuan (US$32m) in compensation to the family of a foreign passenger killed in a high-speed train crash in 2011 in order to incite hatred to the government which gave much lower compensation to Chinese nationals. The Chinese government did have policies in the past to give more compensations to foreigners than locals in disasters, though those policies have been phased out in recent years. Online rumours are particularly pervasive in China, where traditional media is heavily regulated by the government and public trust in the media is low."
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China Prosecuted Internet Policeman in Paid Deletion Cases

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about 9 months ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "In China, censorship is not just about politics but is also a vibrant business. Police in Beijing have detained at least ten people, including employees at web giant Baidu and a web censor working at the Beijing Municipal Public Security Bureau, over allegations that they deleted defamatory online posts about companies and government enterprises in return for money, the Beijing News reports. The case was first surfaced when Baidu noticed and reported several of its workers illegal activities. From 2010 to 2012, Gu, an ex-Baidu employee, is believed to have deleted over 2,000 posts on Baidu, 500 on news site Sohu and 20 posts on qianlong.com, with over 2 million yuan ($322,000) reportedly changing hands. While Gu can delete negative Internet posts for topics ranging from environmental issues to product quality problems on behalf of companies, he could not delete posts relating to his government clients. So he paid and asked Liu, a Beijing Municipal Public Security Bureau web censor, to issue official orders to the web sites to remove the posts (in Chinese, here's the google translation). Liu was found to have accepted 770,000 yuan ($124,000) from Gu for deleting posts. He also received 150,000 yuan ($24,000) from other sources."
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Chinese e-Commerce Giant to Go IPO in US

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about 10 months ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "China e-commerce giant Alibaba Group confirmed early Sunday that it plans to become a public company in the US. The proposed US IPO, which is expected to raise more than $15 billion and giving Alibaba a $130 billion valuation, is a bid winning over Hong Kong stock exchange, which had been competing for the offering with US stock exchanges but objected to some of Alibaba's proposed listing terms. Founded in 1999 by former English teacher Jack Ma, the Hangzhou, China company, of which Yahoo owns 24%, provides marketplace platforms that allow merchants to sell goods directly to consumers controlling 80% of Internet e-commerce market in China."
Link to Original Source
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China Accuses Western Media Double-Standard Over Terror Attacks

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about a year ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "In a side-by-side comparison, China's People's Daily, the main mouth piece of the Chinese government, slams Western media of double-standard in the reporting of the Kunming train station terrorist attack in which 29 people were killed and 140 injured. The Western media named include BBC, CNN, The Telegraph, and The Fox News are accused of using words such as "violence", "knife attack" that paint the event as a regular crime, but used the word "terror attack", "terrorism" to describe the London attack last year that resulted in a single military personnel dead. The newspaper also accused CNN of double-quoting the word "terrorists" in a later report. The article also compare the official U.S. responses which use similar wordings."
Link to Original Source
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Chinese Moon Rover Said Early Good Bye

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  1 year,2 days

hackingbear (988354) writes "The Chinese moon rover, Jade Rabbit, encountered abnormality in control mechanism before its planned sleep during the 14-day-long lunar night. In the form of a diary, the Jade Rabbit said, "The shi-fu ("kung-fu maters", meaning the scientists and engineers) are working around the clock trying to fix the problm and their eyes look like rabbit's (in red due to fatigue), but I may not be able to survive over this lunar night." (translated, original in Chinese.) The rover. landed on moon on Dec 14 and was designed to operate for three months, vowed to continue the mission with Chang'e 5 in 2017."
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China's Single's Day Is The World's Biggest Online Shopping Blitz

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about a year ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "While the Cyber Monday after Thanksgiving is the busiest online shopping day in the U.S., it pals in comparison to China's Single's Day on November 11 (11/11), which started out in the 1990s as a protest to Valentine's Day. Sales on Singles' Day last year for Alibaba Group, China's biggest e-retailer, totaled more than $3.1 billion, doubling the $1.5 billion spent by U.S. consumers on Cyber Monday in 2012. This year, Alibaba's two ecommerce sites, Tmall and Taobao Marketplace, are expecting sales of at least $4.9 billion. The websites across China will be offering 50% discounts on items like boyfriend body pillows and hoodies that read "I am single because I am fat.""
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China Lifts Bans on Facebook/Twitter, Allows Foriegn ISP in Free Trade Zone

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about a year ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "Beijing has made the landmark decision to lift a ban on internet access within the Shanghai Free-trade Zone to foreign websites considered politically sensitive by the Chinese government, including Facebook, Twitter and newspaper website The New York Times. The new free trade zone would also welcome bids from foreign telecommunications companies for licenses to provide internet services within the new special economic zone to compete with the state-own China Mobile, China Telecom and China Unicom; the big three telcos didn’t raise complaints as they knew it was a decision endorsed by top Chinese leaders including Premier Li Keqiang, who is keen to make the free-trade zone a key proving ground for significant financial and economic reforms, the sources added. The decision to lift of the bans, for now, only applies to the Zone and not else where in China. “In order to welcome foreign companies to invest and to let foreigners live and work happily in the free-trade zone, we must think about how we can make them feel like at home. If they can’t get onto Facebook or read The New York Times, they may naturally wonder how special the free-trade zone is compared with the rest of China,” said one of the government sources who declined to be named due to the highly political sensitive nature of the matter."
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China Allows More Online Speech but Curbing Actions and Rumors

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about a year ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "NPR.org reported that Harvard sociologist Gary King has just completed two studies that peer into the Chinese censorship machine — including a field experiment within China that was conducted with extraordinary secrecy. Together, the studies refute popular intuitions about what Chinese censors are after. He found that the censors actually permit "vitriolic criticism" of China's leaders and governmental policies but the censors crack down heavily on any move to get people physically mobilized to act on such criticism. In an example, a Chinese mother protesting a local official leading sympathetic outrage on social media sites, but the action was almost entirely online — and that flurry of posts went uncensored. By contrast, after the Japanese earthquake, there was a run on salt in China, King says, because people believed — wrongly — that eating salt could protect them against disorders linked to radiation. People physically mobilized around the issue, and media posts that cataloged these activities were quickly censored, King said, because the online commentary corresponded to a physical, public presence. In a related development, China's top court issued a ruling on Monday to threaten a 3-year sentence for people posting online rumors viewed by 5,000 internet users or reposted more than 500 times. Though, in the same ruling, the court also clarified that a person reposting false rumor should not be punished (in Chinese) if he or she does not clearly know the information is false, even if real harm is done. That's considered a progress in protecting speech. As the Internet has grown into an easily accessible platform for the Chinese public, an increase in crimes such as defamation and blackmail has occurred online over the past few years, the ruling said. However, the top court's spokesman, Sun Jungong, stressed that Internet users are still encouraged to expose corruption and other violations despite the new rules, adding that as long as web users are not fabricating information to slander others, they will not face criminal charges."
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Lenovo CEO Shares $3 Million Bonus with Workers

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about a year ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "Yang Yuanqing, founder and CEO of Chinese PC maker Lenovo, will share $3.25 million from his bonus with some 10,000 staff in China and 19 other countries. "Most are hourly manufacturing workers," Lenovo spokeswoman Angela Lee said. "As you can imagine, an extra $300 in a manufacturing environment in China does make an impact, especially to employees supporting families." In its annual review last year, Lenovo raised Yang's base pay to $1.2 million and awarded him a $4.2 million discretionary bonus and a $8.9 million long-term incentive award. Yang owns 7.12% of Lenovo's shares, equivalent to about $720 million in stock."
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US Banned from Exporting Trash to China Are Drowning in Plastic

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about a year and a half ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "Not only we depend on Chinese labor for the imports but we also depend on them to clean up our mess. Being green is getting a lot harder for eco-friendly states in the US, thanks to the country’s dependency on overrun Chinese recycling facilities since the start of China's Green Fence policy this year. Recycling centers in Oregon and Washington recently stopped accepting clear plastic “clamshell” containers used for berries, plastic hospital gowns and plastic bags, while California’s farmers are grappling with what to do with the 50,000 to 75,000 tons of plastic they use each year. The Green Fence initiative bans bales of plastic that haven’t been cleaned or thoroughly sorted. That type of recyclable material, which costs more to recycle, often it ends up in China’s landfills, which have become a source of recent unrest in the country’s south. For every ton of reusable plastic, China has received many more tons of random trash, some of it toxic. That has helped build “trash mountains” so high they sometimes bury people alive. For a country facing environmental crisis after environmental crisis, it is no longer tenable to accept US waste exports."
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