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Comments

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San Francisco's Housing Crisis Explained

hackingbear Re:Simple problem, simple solution (359 comments)

NIMBY is an unavoidable phenomena in advanced economy. With enforcement of environment protection laws, you can be sure of hazard over development and pollution, like in China for up to now. Then once it became a significant problem, people would rise up and complaint and started creating/enforcing environment laws -- China is now at this stage. Then once there are sufficient laws, some people will then start abusing the laws to protect their own interest, thus NIMBY -- even China now has had quite many large scale protests against building chemical factories in their neighborhoods.

Can people stay the middle way and be rational? No, and will never. The two extremes will have to fight and the pendulum will swing back and forth. That's why the Yin-Yang symbol is not gray colored but spinning black and white. Therefore, there is nothing to worry about. People will fight their way to balance in the long term.

5 days ago
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Turing Award Goes To Distributed Computing Wrangler Leslie Lamport

hackingbear FIRST POST (40 comments)

my request counter is 0!

about a month ago
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Google Buys Home Automation Company Nest

hackingbear Re:I'll be keeping mine (257 comments)

All EULA also contains clauses like "We can change the terms of this agreement at will." And once it got enough penetration, a letter/email looking a like a junk will be sent to you inbox/mailbox with a lengthy legal statement of the changes and guaranteed 99% will not ever read and remaining 99% will not care a damn thing.

In this country, we cook you like frog in slow cooker powered by fine prints.

about 3 months ago
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Researchers Find Some Volcanoes 'Scream' At Increasing Pitches Until They Blow

hackingbear and also (59 comments)

some volcanoes will erect before they blow.

about 9 months ago
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Can OpenStack Avoid Fragmentation In China?

hackingbear Motive? (42 comments)

Fragmenting an existing standard creates a new standard that can draw in $$$. Everything else, national security, national pride, etc., are just excused to rip public funds. US or China.

and isn't open source meant to encourage such -- can you count how many Linux distributions out there?

about 9 months ago
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China Environment Ministry Calls Itself One of Four Worst Departments In World

hackingbear Re:What About the Ministry of Censorship? (126 comments)

If sina.com (and online news portals sohu.com and netease.com which all carry the same piece) are not major Chinese news sources, I don't know what can be. Further the original sina.com link is contributed by Globe Times which is a subsidiary of People's Daily and is considered more pro-government than its parent. PD's website also carries the same news. And why is the re-posting of BBC article even logically relevant to this discussion of censorship here?

Clearly another victim of Department of Education!

about 9 months ago
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China Environment Ministry Calls Itself One of Four Worst Departments In World

hackingbear Re:What About the Ministry of Censorship? (126 comments)

Surely the Environmental Ministry cannot be as harmful as the Chinese Ministry preventing this quote from being carried in Xinhua, China Daily or any major news source in China?
[...]
Solve your censorship problem and you will solve a lot of your other problems. Just be prepared to see high turnover in your leadership -- something that has been needed for a very long time in China.

Let me guess which ministry you are referring to...

Ah, must be the U.S. Department of Education. Since it obvious doesn't teach you Chinese and consequently causing you unable to
  read this same news in Chinese news and make up false conclusion.

about 9 months ago
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Did Internet Sales Tax Backers Bribe Congress? (Video)

hackingbear Will stop blowing my nose (317 comments)

Yet Jeff Flake (R-AZ), he received $588,966 $2,800 - a staggering 200x in favor, and voted "NO".

Mark Kirk (R-IL) $1,076,621to $28,200 or some 35x in favor, another "NO" vote.

Dear Donor,

Thank you for your generous checks! As promised, I will not blow my nose (we call it filibustering) during the public performance of our Circus, even though I have an impressively long nose longer than that of Pinocchio's, so that the Donkeys can pass your bill. But I will immediately blame the Donkeys for passing the bill. Don't worry. That won't hurt your bill a bit. I just do it to entice other of my donors to continue to write checks to me.

Thanks again for your generous checks! Keep in touch.

Sincerely,

The Elephants

about a year ago
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Did Internet Sales Tax Backers Bribe Congress? (Video)

hackingbear Re:Huh? (317 comments)

Yet Jeff Flake (R-AZ), he received $588,966 $2,800 - a staggering 200x in favor, and voted "NO".

Mark Kirk (R-IL) $1,076,621to $28,200 or some 35x in favor, another "NO" vote.

But maybe 200X got them not to start filibuster the bill? If you don't pay enough, the R will filibuster to block it; if you do pay enough, the R will not filibuster but blame the D.

about a year ago
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Noodle Robots Replacing Workers In Chinese Restaurants

hackingbear Re:Note on the noodle (531 comments)

Correct. Wait until robots can do ramen (pulled noodles, as in the original meaning of the word.) That's what a real human noodle maker will do in China to be employable.

about a year ago
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Chinese Government Suspected of Unleashing Astroturfers Against Apple

hackingbear Re:Why government? (194 comments)

Nobody disputes that. And so it is justified? Just like we used to befriend Saddam Hussein for the same reason? We're not on moral high ground and our public and media wouldn't criticize their own country's actions much since it is unpatriotic and thus unwelcome. It is all rooted in selfishness and double standards.

about a year ago
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Chinese Government Suspected of Unleashing Astroturfers Against Apple

hackingbear Re:Why government? (194 comments)

The US didn't support Mao and the US was not complicit in the building of a police state in China.

What about:

  • The US didn't help the ROC to fight off the communists after WWII, causing the eventual change of power on the mainland
  • After China had successfully developed nuclear bombs, the US didn't defend ROC's membership in the UN Security Council but miserably missing during a key vote that turned the key membership to the PRC.
  • A few years later, a US Secretary of States and a President visited Mao during Cultural Revolution, period with a million times worse human rights violation, to ally them to fight for the Soviet
  • For the same reason of fighting its cold war, the US opened its market to China

No doubt that North Korea is now learning from US-China relations. And we can predict NK will be an US ally against China in a decade. When it comes to foreign politics, no country was / is clean.

about a year ago
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Blog Reveals a Chinese Military Hacker's Life Is One of Boredom and Bitterness

hackingbear Remind me of WMD in Iraq (185 comments)

Exactly! This whole sage has suddenly been blown up recently. They have the full control of their routers and gateway and can fake network addressing information anyway they want, if it is a serious spy operation. Besides, anyone who really know China should know that government departments or employees in china are almost ways just work for their own projects for their own profits, rather than that of the country's.

This whole saga reminds me of the WMD in Iraq claim before the Iraq war. It was so convinced at the time that Iraq was building/storing massive WMD that aimed at US... until we spent trillions of dollar and thousands of lives to find out the whole thing is a flop. So many defense contractors who were friendly to the ruling parties got big rainfall, and nobody really got punished for such terrible intelligence.

This time, though, we will never find out the truth, because we can't possibly invade China to find out. We will just keep spending $$$. Thanks a lot!

about a year ago
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China Says It Is the Target of US Hack Attacks

hackingbear Re:YAWN (242 comments)

China is very poor at public relation marketing and packaging. The government hasn't really needed to spit out anything other than blunt propaganda that nobody in China believe (go check out comments in any Chinese news forum to see.) As their society becomes modernized with more and more PR, marketing people and lawyers trained in the West, they will eventually refine their PR just like us. They will enter the era of marketing just like us.

The USA, on the other hand, has been very very good at that, both government and private companies. That's why we got world-wide brand names like Coke and McDonald's. Ad that's why we all believed in WMD in Iraq before we spent a trillion dollars and thousands of lives to find out it is a flop and nobody got punished for the 'intelligence error".

about a year ago
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A Tale of Two Databases, Revisited: DynamoDB and MongoDB

hackingbear Re:Better headline (73 comments)

No. This headline is better:

Mongo Not a New Lemon In the World of DB

about a year ago
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New Process Takes Energy From Coal Without Burning It

hackingbear Re:What happens to the carbon dioxide? (365 comments)

The CO2 can be fed to algae tanks to continue another energy production process. It would be easier than doing the same with traditional coal plant if the CO2 is clean and not mixed with ash etc.

about a year ago
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Security Firm Mandiant Says China's Army Runs Hacking Group APT1

hackingbear or pay ... (137 comments)

... to the contractors. This just looks like WMD in Iraq again -- you (taxpayers) paid a trillion dollar to find out the whole thing was fake and yet nobody got punished. For this one, you will spend billion$ and still won't know if it is real -- after all we can't invade China to find out. When somebody tries to sell you something hard, it must be fishy.

I just wonder why a sophisticate spy operation forgot to fake their IP addresses but leave all trails to one location, given that they have controls of their routers and gateways.

about a year ago
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Security Firm Mandiant Says China's Army Runs Hacking Group APT1

hackingbear WMD in Irqa 2.0? (137 comments)

Repots from contractors? How do we know it is not the same this time? Last time, it was so convincing too until after we spent a trillion dollars and thousands of lives.

about a year ago
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Tax Peculiarities Mean Facebook Paid No Net Taxes For 2012

hackingbear Re:Wrong question (307 comments)

The *real* problem is a set of beliefs, including that rich people are better than everyone else, that giving more and more money to rich people will help the economy grow, and that money is the only effective motivator of human behavior.

Unfortunately, that's not untrue. Wealth gap is like potential energy in physics. Without it, you can't have kinetic energy to get works done. People who think that the society can progress by forcefully, evenly distributing wealth have not lived in Soviet/China before economic reform -- it was proven a failure. Think of the thousands of start-ups in Silicon Valley, majority of them are funded by venture capitalists -- very rich people; most of these companies still fail at the end. If the VCs think they can't rip sufficient rewards back in the remaining successful ones, why would they bet their money? If you find you can't make more than the same amount of money working as employee, why would you risk everything you have to found a company? It would be better to keep the money in the bank earning negative interest still since it has little risk. As the market mature, it is harder and harder to easily find profitable niches but people will not have works without companies, so more and more incentives -- in tax deduction or even subsidies like in green tech -- have to be handed out.

It always comes down to the right ratio. Perhaps the golden ratio is the right one -- something like 38% people controlling 62% of wealth.

about a year ago

Submissions

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Chinese Man on Trial for Spreading False Rumours Online

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about two weeks ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "Qin Zhihui, a user of the Chinese Twitter-like website Weibo, has confessed in court to spreading false rumors about the Chinese government in the first public trial under a Chinese crackdown on online rumors. China has threatened criminal penalties against anyone who spreads rumors on microblogs that are reposted more than 500 times, or seen by more than 5,000 users. Qin invented a story that the government gave 200m yuan (US$32m) in compensation to the family of a foreign passenger killed in a high-speed train crash in 2011 in order to incite hatred to the government which gave much lower compensation to Chinese nationals. The Chinese government did have policies in the past to give more compensations to foreigners than locals in disasters, though those policies have been phased out in recent years. Online rumours are particularly pervasive in China, where traditional media is heavily regulated by the government and public trust in the media is low."
Link to Original Source
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China Prosecuted Internet Policeman in Paid Deletion Cases

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about three weeks ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "In China, censorship is not just about politics but is also a vibrant business. Police in Beijing have detained at least ten people, including employees at web giant Baidu and a web censor working at the Beijing Municipal Public Security Bureau, over allegations that they deleted defamatory online posts about companies and government enterprises in return for money, the Beijing News reports. The case was first surfaced when Baidu noticed and reported several of its workers illegal activities. From 2010 to 2012, Gu, an ex-Baidu employee, is believed to have deleted over 2,000 posts on Baidu, 500 on news site Sohu and 20 posts on qianlong.com, with over 2 million yuan ($322,000) reportedly changing hands. While Gu can delete negative Internet posts for topics ranging from environmental issues to product quality problems on behalf of companies, he could not delete posts relating to his government clients. So he paid and asked Liu, a Beijing Municipal Public Security Bureau web censor, to issue official orders to the web sites to remove the posts (in Chinese, here's the google translation). Liu was found to have accepted 770,000 yuan ($124,000) from Gu for deleting posts. He also received 150,000 yuan ($24,000) from other sources."
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Chinese e-Commerce Giant to Go IPO in US

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about a month ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "China e-commerce giant Alibaba Group confirmed early Sunday that it plans to become a public company in the US. The proposed US IPO, which is expected to raise more than $15 billion and giving Alibaba a $130 billion valuation, is a bid winning over Hong Kong stock exchange, which had been competing for the offering with US stock exchanges but objected to some of Alibaba's proposed listing terms. Founded in 1999 by former English teacher Jack Ma, the Hangzhou, China company, of which Yahoo owns 24%, provides marketplace platforms that allow merchants to sell goods directly to consumers controlling 80% of Internet e-commerce market in China."
Link to Original Source
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China Accuses Western Media Double-Standard Over Terror Attacks

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about a month and a half ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "In a side-by-side comparison, China's People's Daily, the main mouth piece of the Chinese government, slams Western media of double-standard in the reporting of the Kunming train station terrorist attack in which 29 people were killed and 140 injured. The Western media named include BBC, CNN, The Telegraph, and The Fox News are accused of using words such as "violence", "knife attack" that paint the event as a regular crime, but used the word "terror attack", "terrorism" to describe the London attack last year that resulted in a single military personnel dead. The newspaper also accused CNN of double-quoting the word "terrorists" in a later report. The article also compare the official U.S. responses which use similar wordings."
Link to Original Source
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Chinese Moon Rover Said Early Good Bye

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about 3 months ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "The Chinese moon rover, Jade Rabbit, encountered abnormality in control mechanism before its planned sleep during the 14-day-long lunar night. In the form of a diary, the Jade Rabbit said, "The shi-fu ("kung-fu maters", meaning the scientists and engineers) are working around the clock trying to fix the problm and their eyes look like rabbit's (in red due to fatigue), but I may not be able to survive over this lunar night." (translated, original in Chinese.) The rover. landed on moon on Dec 14 and was designed to operate for three months, vowed to continue the mission with Chang'e 5 in 2017."
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China's Single's Day Is The World's Biggest Online Shopping Blitz

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about 5 months ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "While the Cyber Monday after Thanksgiving is the busiest online shopping day in the U.S., it pals in comparison to China's Single's Day on November 11 (11/11), which started out in the 1990s as a protest to Valentine's Day. Sales on Singles' Day last year for Alibaba Group, China's biggest e-retailer, totaled more than $3.1 billion, doubling the $1.5 billion spent by U.S. consumers on Cyber Monday in 2012. This year, Alibaba's two ecommerce sites, Tmall and Taobao Marketplace, are expecting sales of at least $4.9 billion. The websites across China will be offering 50% discounts on items like boyfriend body pillows and hoodies that read "I am single because I am fat.""
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China Lifts Bans on Facebook/Twitter, Allows Foriegn ISP in Free Trade Zone

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about 7 months ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "Beijing has made the landmark decision to lift a ban on internet access within the Shanghai Free-trade Zone to foreign websites considered politically sensitive by the Chinese government, including Facebook, Twitter and newspaper website The New York Times. The new free trade zone would also welcome bids from foreign telecommunications companies for licenses to provide internet services within the new special economic zone to compete with the state-own China Mobile, China Telecom and China Unicom; the big three telcos didn’t raise complaints as they knew it was a decision endorsed by top Chinese leaders including Premier Li Keqiang, who is keen to make the free-trade zone a key proving ground for significant financial and economic reforms, the sources added. The decision to lift of the bans, for now, only applies to the Zone and not else where in China. “In order to welcome foreign companies to invest and to let foreigners live and work happily in the free-trade zone, we must think about how we can make them feel like at home. If they can’t get onto Facebook or read The New York Times, they may naturally wonder how special the free-trade zone is compared with the rest of China,” said one of the government sources who declined to be named due to the highly political sensitive nature of the matter."
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China Allows More Online Speech but Curbing Actions and Rumors

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about 7 months ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "NPR.org reported that Harvard sociologist Gary King has just completed two studies that peer into the Chinese censorship machine — including a field experiment within China that was conducted with extraordinary secrecy. Together, the studies refute popular intuitions about what Chinese censors are after. He found that the censors actually permit "vitriolic criticism" of China's leaders and governmental policies but the censors crack down heavily on any move to get people physically mobilized to act on such criticism. In an example, a Chinese mother protesting a local official leading sympathetic outrage on social media sites, but the action was almost entirely online — and that flurry of posts went uncensored. By contrast, after the Japanese earthquake, there was a run on salt in China, King says, because people believed — wrongly — that eating salt could protect them against disorders linked to radiation. People physically mobilized around the issue, and media posts that cataloged these activities were quickly censored, King said, because the online commentary corresponded to a physical, public presence. In a related development, China's top court issued a ruling on Monday to threaten a 3-year sentence for people posting online rumors viewed by 5,000 internet users or reposted more than 500 times. Though, in the same ruling, the court also clarified that a person reposting false rumor should not be punished (in Chinese) if he or she does not clearly know the information is false, even if real harm is done. That's considered a progress in protecting speech. As the Internet has grown into an easily accessible platform for the Chinese public, an increase in crimes such as defamation and blackmail has occurred online over the past few years, the ruling said. However, the top court's spokesman, Sun Jungong, stressed that Internet users are still encouraged to expose corruption and other violations despite the new rules, adding that as long as web users are not fabricating information to slander others, they will not face criminal charges."
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Lenovo CEO Shares $3 Million Bonus with Workers

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about 8 months ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "Yang Yuanqing, founder and CEO of Chinese PC maker Lenovo, will share $3.25 million from his bonus with some 10,000 staff in China and 19 other countries. "Most are hourly manufacturing workers," Lenovo spokeswoman Angela Lee said. "As you can imagine, an extra $300 in a manufacturing environment in China does make an impact, especially to employees supporting families." In its annual review last year, Lenovo raised Yang's base pay to $1.2 million and awarded him a $4.2 million discretionary bonus and a $8.9 million long-term incentive award. Yang owns 7.12% of Lenovo's shares, equivalent to about $720 million in stock."
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US Banned from Exporting Trash to China Are Drowning in Plastic

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about 7 months ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "Not only we depend on Chinese labor for the imports but we also depend on them to clean up our mess. Being green is getting a lot harder for eco-friendly states in the US, thanks to the country’s dependency on overrun Chinese recycling facilities since the start of China's Green Fence policy this year. Recycling centers in Oregon and Washington recently stopped accepting clear plastic “clamshell” containers used for berries, plastic hospital gowns and plastic bags, while California’s farmers are grappling with what to do with the 50,000 to 75,000 tons of plastic they use each year. The Green Fence initiative bans bales of plastic that haven’t been cleaned or thoroughly sorted. That type of recyclable material, which costs more to recycle, often it ends up in China’s landfills, which have become a source of recent unrest in the country’s south. For every ton of reusable plastic, China has received many more tons of random trash, some of it toxic. That has helped build “trash mountains” so high they sometimes bury people alive. For a country facing environmental crisis after environmental crisis, it is no longer tenable to accept US waste exports."
Link to Original Source
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India Army Mistook Planets for Spy Drones

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about 9 months ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "BBC reports that India's army spent six months watching "Chinese spy drones" violating its air space, only to find out they were actually Jupiter and Venus. Between last August and February, Indian troops had already documented 329 sightings of unidentified objects over a lake in the border region next to China. India accused the objects being Chinese spy drones. The incident has even escalated to military build-up and stand-off at border between the two countries. High level talks were held between the two military. The Chinese denied they invaded Indian space and told India to shoot down the objects if they can and the India side replied the objects were too high, according to a Chinese news report (Google translation). At the meantime, residents of the solar system are grad that India does not possess the capability to shoot down such high attitude objects."
Link to Original Source
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China Environment Ministry Calls Itself One of Four Worst Departments in World

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about 9 months ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "In a startlingly blunt assessment of his five-year-old ministry, Zhou Shengxian was quoted by state media as saying: "I've heard that there are four major embarrassing departments in the world and that China's ministry of environmental protection is one of them." Mr Zhou, the minister of the department and an economist and veteran Communist Party member, blamed his ministry's malfunctions on "overlapping" remits, which confused the agency's role in handling issues such as carbon emissions and water monitoring. The minister made no mention of the other three most embarrassing departments but Chinese micro-bloggers were quick to weigh in with their suggestions including the navy of China's landlocked neighbour, Mongolia, Taiwan's foreign ministry, and China's petitioning department where officials are tasked with hearing and acting on the grievances of ordinary Chinese but can't handle/solve anything. Perhaps Zhou's department should be applauded for its honesty. What are your list of the other three most embarrassing departments in our world?"
Link to Original Source
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China Court Fines Apple for Copyright Violations

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about a year ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "The Beijing No. 2 Intermediate People's Court ruled in favor of the authors, and Apple will have to pay them in excess of 730,000 yuan (US$118,000) for the infringement. Apple had not gotten permission before selling their books on the Apple App Store, it noted. These cases were the second batch of lawsuits filed against Apple by the Writers' Right Protection Union, which includes prominent members like prolific blogger and novelist Han Han who have become a pop culture star through his creative and cynical writings criticizing the (Chinese) government."
Link to Original Source
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South Korea Backtracked Chinese IP Address in Cyberattack

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  1 year,27 days

hackingbear (988354) writes "The suspected cyberattack that struck South Korean banks and media companies this week didn't originate from a Chinese IP address, South Korean officials said Friday, contradicting their previous claim. The Korea Communications Commission said that after "detailed analysis," the IP address used in the attack is the bank's internal IP address which is coincidentally identical a Chinese ISP's address, among the 2^32 address space available."
Link to Original Source
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China 3-D Prints Its Newest Jets, Dramatically Cut Cost and Time

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about a year ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "Cong Sun, Chief Architect of the new Chinese carrier-based J-15 fighter jet Cong, recently unveiled that 3D printing has been widely used in designing and producing of the jet which had its first successful test in October 2012. 3D printing has been used to manufacture critical titanium alloy load-bearing structure on the aircraft, including the entire nose landing gear. China aims to become a leader in commercializing 3D printing technology to manufacture titanium parts in aviation industry. The laser additive manufacturing technology could save 90% of raw material, and the cost is only 5% of the traditional method — for example, the cost of a part made with traditional technology is 25 million RMB (4 million USD), but using laser additive manufacturing technology the cost is only 1.3 million (210K USD). Because no tooling is required, the processing charge is also just 10% of the orginal. Chief Architect Cong Sun recently unveiled that 3D printing has been widely used in designing and producing of the newest J-15 prototype which had its first successful test in October 2012. 3D printing has been used to manufacture critical titanium alloy load-bearing structure on the aircraft, including the entire nose landing gear. If the forged titanium parts on an American F-22 were made in China, 40 percent of the weight can be reduced while same strength could be maintained. Chinese media report (in Chinese) also credited the use of 3-D printing in recent massive speeding up of new generation military jet development, including the J-31 stealth fighter jets. Looks like we can outsource F-22/F-35 production as well to save our budget."
Link to Original Source
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China Claimed Millions of Computers Hacked by U.S.-based Servers

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about a year ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "While we have heard reports of computers being hacked from China almost every other day, China's National Computer Network Emergency Response Centre identified 7.8 million computers in China had been hacked in the first six months of last year, with the most common location of the attackers being in the US (pay wall). According to CNCERT, 73,286 overseas IPs were involved in hacking China’s 14.19 million IPs, among which 10.5 million received attacks from US-based servers, 780,000 from South Korea and 778,000 from Germany. Apparently, as neither side can prove their claims or disprove the other's claims with absolutely indisputable evidences, the war of words will keep going."
Link to Original Source
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China Accuse Computer Hacking Originated From the U.S.

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about a year ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "While we have heard reports of computers being hacked from China almost every other day, China has responded in this war of mouths by accusing massive computer hacking from U.S. China's National Computer Network Emergency Response Centre identified 7.8 million computers in China had been hacked in the first six months of last year, with the most common location of the attackers being in the US. "It is very complicated to determine the source of hacker attacks, so it's arbitrary and irresponsible for the US to blame China's network for the attacks with no real evidence," an editorial in People's Daily said. Apparently, just like we can't get any real indisputable evidences of (government sponsored) hacking from China, they cannot prove their claims definitely either. Neither each side can disprove the other's claims definitely. So everybody should just continue believing what one has prejudiced to. And let the war of mouth continue while we enjoy the show."
Link to Original Source
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Chinese Blogger Thrives as Muckraker

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about a year ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "The New York Times reported the story of a Chinese blogger named Zhu Ruifeng who has become an overnight celebrity in China in the two months since he posted online secretly recorded video of an 18-year-old woman having sex with a memorably unattractive 57-year-old official from the southwestern municipality of Chongqing, causing the official, along with 10 other officials, to loss their jobs and be put under investigation. Mr. Zhu says ordinary citizens have come to rely on the Internet for retribution, even if it often amounts to mob justice. “We used to say that when you have a problem, go to the police,” he said. “Now we say when you have a problem, go to the netizens.” At the meantime, he has also become a litmus test of how committed China’s new leaders are in their battle against corruption — and whether they can tolerate populist crusaders like Mr. Zhu."
Link to Original Source
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Foxconn Workers to Form Genuine Union

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about a year ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "The Financial Times reported that Taiwanese manufacturing giant Foxconn, China’s largest private sector employer with 1.2m mainland workers, is preparing genuinely representative labour union elections in its factories in China for the first time (free registration required), a powerful sign of the changes in the workshop of the world demanded by an increasingly restive workforce. This would be the first such exercise at a large company in China, where labour unions have traditionally been controlled by management and local government. “The position of chairman and 20 committee members of the Foxconn Federation of Labour Unions Committee will be determined through elections once every five years through an anonymous ballot voting process,” Foxconn said in response to questions from the Financial Times. After the Lunar New Year holiday this month, Foxconn, with the help of the Fair Labor Association, a U.S.-based labor group, will begin training its Chinese workers in how to vote for their 18,000 representatives."
Link to Original Source
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Unemployed Chinese Graduates Say No Thanks to Factory Jobs

hackingbear hackingbear writes  |  about a year ago

hackingbear (988354) writes "While people and politicians are pitching for more educations and reviving manufacturing in this country, jobs go begging in factories while many college educated young workers, which now number 11 times more than in 1989, are unemployed or underemployed in China. A national survey of urban residents, released this winter by a Chinese university, showed that among people in their early 20s, those with a college degree were four times as likely to be unemployed as those with only an elementary school education. Yet, it is not about the pay. Many factories are desperate for workers, despite offering double-digit annual pay increases and improved benefits, while an office job would initially pay as little as a third of factory wages. The glut of college graduates is eroding wages even for those with more marketable majors, like computer science. Vocational schools and training programs are unpopular because they suffer from a low statue of for people from unsuccessful, poor, or peasant backgrounds.“The more educated people are, the less they want to work in a factory,” said an unemployed graduate. If we do succeed bringing back factory jobs, are their enough people want them?"
Link to Original Source

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  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
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