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MPAA Bans Google Glass In Theaters

hawkeyeMI Re:Can Google Glass record for 2 hours on one char (267 comments)

It would require an external battery pack (very possible) and an asbestos pad between the glass and the wearer's head. It actually would probably shut down from overheating. It doesn't like running and charging at the same time, and I think recording that much video would overheat it anyway.

2 hours ago
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Why Every Cardiac Patient Needs a Virtual Heart

hawkeyeMI Re:Every patient? (61 comments)

Imaging is done on hospital MRI scanners. Image processing is done on normal Linux workstations using COTS and OS software. Simulations are run on Penguin on Demand at the moment (Beowulf cluster... yes really).

2 days ago
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Why Every Cardiac Patient Needs a Virtual Heart

hawkeyeMI Re:Computational Medicine (61 comments)

Unfortunately it's not open source, but yes, you've got the right site. That's us. The services on that site are outdated, however.

2 days ago
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Why Every Cardiac Patient Needs a Virtual Heart

hawkeyeMI Re:Every patient? (61 comments)

The largest financial burden per-patient is the imaging. An MRI can cost over $2k. The rest of the cost is going to have to do with getting a software-based medical device approved, which requires substantial software re-engineering and clinical trials to satisfy the FDA.

2 days ago
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Why Every Cardiac Patient Needs a Virtual Heart

hawkeyeMI Re:Every patient? (61 comments)

1. The system is run offsite, it doesn't currently have any installation costs.
2. It depends on what you factor in. There are a lot of costs to cover engineering and so on. The patient needs an MRI if they weren't already going to have one. That's the biggest cost depending on the hosptial (~US$2k). It's not currently being sold and pricing will have to be determined.
3. We operate the backend, all the doctors have to do is upload the MRI. Minimal training is required to interpret the results. We're working on presenting the data to EPs in forms they are already familiar with.

2 days ago
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Why Every Cardiac Patient Needs a Virtual Heart

hawkeyeMI Re:Cost less? Doubtful. (61 comments)

The difference in procedure time will be substantial. Right now most of the time spent on a VT ablation is for mapping the rhythms and scar. We can pretty much eliminate that (trials ongoing), meaning the procedure can be cut from 4-12 hours down to 2-3 hours, reliably. Considering the cost of time in the EP lab, the savings can be quite large. When it comes to ICDs, risk stratification is really important. If we can avoid putting in unnecessary devices which cost (not counting implantation) $25k-$55k, that's a big savings.

2 days ago
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Why Every Cardiac Patient Needs a Virtual Heart

hawkeyeMI Re:Meaningless! (61 comments)

This research is being done in cooperation with EPs at JHU and some other top insitutions. It's not being done in a vaccum. We have retrospective validation and prospective is ongoing.

2 days ago
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Why Every Cardiac Patient Needs a Virtual Heart

hawkeyeMI Re:Computational Medicine (61 comments)

These are preliminary results. They have not been published yet.

2 days ago
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Why Every Cardiac Patient Needs a Virtual Heart

hawkeyeMI Re:Every patient? (61 comments)

I'm working on the first clinical trial for this (the author is my former PhD advisor). There is good retrospective evidence in humans (described in the article) and I am trying very hard to start getting prospective data. Um. Ask me anything?

2 days ago
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Ask Slashdot: Good Hosting Service For a Parody Site?

hawkeyeMI Re: hosting for parody (115 comments)

That was me and I'm completely serious. But it sounds like that nearly free speech site is just like what the OP is looking for.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Good Hosting Service For a Parody Site?

hawkeyeMI Re: What I recommend (115 comments)

Yes, at the point a suit was filed, the lawyer was needed. But the author appears to have made a solid decision before the lawyer was needed.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Good Hosting Service For a Parody Site?

hawkeyeMI Re: What I recommend (115 comments)

That seemed to come out in favour of the satirist.

about two weeks ago
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Sony Warns Demand For Blu-Ray Diminishing Faster Than Expected

hawkeyeMI As if the downloads are DRM-free (477 comments)

I still buy DVDs and Blu-Rays rather than streaming media because I can always rip them (despite the DRM) and play them on any of my devices, vs paying the same price and only playing on Amazon/Google/whatever-compatible devices (read: not all of the devices I own that can play the video).

about 6 months ago
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Our Education System Is Failing IT

hawkeyeMI These people kept me employed for years (306 comments)

It's a very long story, but I basically worked as a fixer for an HPC company on contract for a few years. I'd log in remotely or (occasionally) fly out and fix messes made by people who didn't know how to solve problems with Linux servers using critical thinking. I'd watch them sometimes and they'd try the only thing they knew how to do, over and over again, without realizing that it wasn't fixing the problem. Instead of narrowing down what could be causing the issue and then doing some research/googling/RTFM and bothering to understand the issue, they'd just reboot the machine over and over, progressively screw up config files worse and worse, and then eventually I'd get called in to fix it. I don't know if it's possible to teach critical thinking skills, or if they're just developed over a lot of self-directed experiments, or if it's an issue of intelligence, but it's got to be costing companies untold millions of dollars every year in the US alone.

about 6 months ago
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Retired SCOTUS Justice Wants To 'Fix' the Second Amendment

hawkeyeMI Re:Not needed (1633 comments)

So keeping is not owning? Really?

about 6 months ago
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Retired SCOTUS Justice Wants To 'Fix' the Second Amendment

hawkeyeMI Intent (1633 comments)

You can argue all day about whether the 2nd amendment should be in place. It's a lot harder to argue about the intent. The founding fathers thought a free people should be armed. http://www.buckeyefirearms.org...

about 6 months ago
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The Amoeba That Eats Human Intestines, Cell By Cell

hawkeyeMI Re:I'm guessing... (71 comments)

And my point is that there are things worse than a higher risk of death.

about 7 months ago
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The Amoeba That Eats Human Intestines, Cell By Cell

hawkeyeMI Re:infects 50 million, eh? (71 comments)

Oh and I forgot, at least one treatment for it, Flagyl, actually makes you feel worse. But at least then you're done and can stop taking it.

about 7 months ago

Submissions

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Barclays Downgrades Electric Utility Bonds Due to Solar Competition

hawkeyeMI hawkeyeMI writes  |  about 5 months ago

hawkeyeMI (412577) writes "Barclays this week downgrades the entire electric sector of the U.S. high-grade corporate bond market to underweight, saying it sees long-term challenges to electric utilities from solar energy, and that the electric sector of the bond market isn’t pricing in these challenges right now. It’s a noteworthy downgrade since electric utilities which make up nearly 7.5% of Barclays’ U.S. Corporate Index by market value."
Link to Original Source
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Installing Debian Wheezy (7.0) Linux on the Chromebook Pixel

hawkeyeMI hawkeyeMI writes  |  about a year and a half ago

hawkeyeMI writes "When Google launched the Chromebook Pixel, it was not long before people started trying to boot normal Linux distributions on it. With Linus Torvalds taking an interest, patches were quickly merged into the Linux git repository, and I continue building the latest version and collecting fixes from elsewhere. I've written up the steps required to get an almost-fully-functional pixel running Debian Wheezy. As of today, I've incorporated fixes that eliminate the audio popping and volume control problems. The only real remaining problem I have is that I can't yet control the keyboard backlight, although I've compiled and loaded a module that is supposed to control it. I'd love it if a Slashdotter more adept than me at kernel hacking could sort that one out."
Link to Original Source
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Ask Slashdot: What is the best way to become a rural ISP?

hawkeyeMI hawkeyeMI writes  |  about 2 years ago

hawkeyeMI writes "I live in a small, rural town nestled in some low hills. Our town has access to only one DSL provider, and it's pretty terrible. However, a regional fiber project is just being completed, and some of the fiber is in fact running directly past my house.

Currently, there are no last-mile providers in my area, and the regional project only considers itself a middle-mile provider, and will only provide service to last-mile providers. Assuming this will not be my day job, that the local populace is rather poor, and that because of the hills, line-of-sight service will be difficult, how could I set myself up as an ISP? I have considered WiFi mesh networking, and even running wires on the power/telephone polls, but the required licensing and other issues are foreign to me. What would you do?"
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Valve Steam for Linux Beta Survey

hawkeyeMI hawkeyeMI writes  |  about 2 years ago

hawkeyeMI writes "Valve has moved one step closer to releasing Steam for Linux, and they want beta testers that have a lot of experience with Linux. Knowing Slashdot, many of you probably fit the bill. So, if you'd like to try to get into the beta, go fill out the survey! You will need a Steam account to do so."
Link to Original Source
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BitInstant rolls out cash deposits at Wal-Mart, 7-11, and more

hawkeyeMI hawkeyeMI writes  |  more than 2 years ago

hawkeyeMI writes "One of the most difficult things about using Bitcoin, the peer-to-peer currency, is getting sovereign currencies into the exchanges. A company called BitInstant has been trying to remedy that for some time, but today has launched the most accessible methods ever for getting USD (and other currencies) into popular exchanges. With their rollout today, one can now deposit cash from Wal-Mart, CVS, 7-11, MoneyGram, and many other locations in the USA, in addition to the major banks they previously supported. Note: although I am involved with Bitcoin I do NOT have any relationship with BitInstant."
Link to Original Source
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India's Graduates Not Suitable for Call Centers

hawkeyeMI hawkeyeMI writes  |  more than 3 years ago

hawkeyeMI writes "There's a story today in the Wall Street Journal about a problem faced by India's outsourcing industry; while there are many graduates from high school and college, most of them lack the critical thinking and English speaking skills needed for work in call centers, and for more skilled labor. The problem is especially keen where communication with the English-speaking world is most needed. This mirrors my own experiences with various firms on Elance, and with GetFriday and AskSunday. Maybe the outsourcing 'threat' espoused by many in IT is hitting its limits?"
Link to Original Source
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Long-term storage of moderately large datasets

hawkeyeMI hawkeyeMI writes  |  more than 4 years ago

hawkeyeMI writes "I have a small scientific services company, and we end up generating fairly large datasets (2-3 TB) for each customer. We don't have to ship all of that, but we do need to keep some compressed archives. The best I can come up with right now is to buy some large hard drives, use software RAID in linux to make a RAID5 set out of them, and store them in a safe deposit box. I feel like there must be a better way for a small business, but despite some research into Blu-ray, I've not been able to find a good, cost-effective alternative. A tape library would be impractical at the present time. If anyone would have some ideas, I figure it would be the Slashdot audience. What do you recommend?"
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Heart simulator enters academic beta

hawkeyeMI hawkeyeMI writes  |  more than 4 years ago

hawkeyeMI (412577) writes "CardioSolv, LLC, a company that is commercializing academic heart simulation software, is beginning a beta trial of their heart simulator and web interface. The simulator is capable of handling a whole human heart using accurate human-derived ionic models. Its capacity is limited only by the constraints of VirtualBox and the machine on which it is running. All of the necessary tools will be bundled in a VirtualBox machine image. The company is now taking sign-ups from academic users on its site. (Disclosure: I am a founder of the company and this is my project.)"
Link to Original Source

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