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Comments

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Study Rules Out Global Warming Being a Natural Fluctuation With 99% Certainty

hyades1 Re:Farners Almanac (856 comments)

Troll elsewhere.

about a week ago
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Study Rules Out Global Warming Being a Natural Fluctuation With 99% Certainty

hyades1 Re:Translation... (856 comments)

Go peddle your bullshit somewhere else. There's people here who actually understand science.

about a week ago
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How Did Bill Nye Become the Science Guy?

hyades1 Re:The man lost interest in science a long time ag (220 comments)

Sorry, but people with brains are past the point of being polite to lying cocksuckers like you.

Make yourself useful. Go fuck your mother with a rake or something.

about a month ago
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The Net Routes Around Censorship In Turkey

hyades1 Unfortunately... (82 comments)

...this is just a nice little lab that will help the NSA figure out how to pick off the low-hanging fruit when THEY decide they want to put a stop to all that nasty free expression stuff.

about a month ago
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Is DIY Brainhacking Safe?

hyades1 Re:Be careful ... (183 comments)

'Way back in my last year of high school, a buddy of mine's older brother dropped by our "common room", where senior students were allowed to relax during spare periods and after school. The guy was well known for his spectacularly comprehensive use of recreational drugs.

So this guy sees that a chess game is just ending, and challenges the winner (one of our top players, as it happened). He took forever to make his moves, but it became obvious before long that he had the game in the bag. When our classmate resigned, my buddy's stoner brother turned around to us, tapped his head, and said, "It might not work as fast as it used to, but it still works".

about a month ago
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1GB of Google Drive Storage Now Costs Only $0.02 Per Month

hyades1 It's a matter of perspective (335 comments)

From the user's point of view, the cost is a bit different. It's x cents per month for storage, plus whatever you pay for internet access.

And, of course, the fact that there's no question Uncle Sam will be pawing through your Rule 34 collection.

about a month ago
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Estimate: Academic Labs 11 Times More Dangerous Than Industrial Counterparts

hyades1 There are liars...and statisticians (153 comments)

The results might be somewhat different, of course, if industrial labs didn't conduct most of their investigations "in-house". (snicker)

about a month and a half ago
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First Outdoor Flocks of Autonomous Flying Robots

hyades1 Sorry, I couldn't resist... (84 comments)

Hurray, hurray, it's the First of May!

Outdoor flocking starts today!

about 2 months ago
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Fishing Line As Artificial "Muscle"

hyades1 It's only a matter of time... (111 comments)

"So tell us again, Lefty, how you got that friction burn on your pecker."

about 2 months ago
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FBI: $10,000 Reward For Info On Anyone Who Points a Laser At an Aircraft

hyades1 Re:Too Tempting (445 comments)

And a free buggering once a week from your very own gigantic lifer cellmate. What could be better than that!

about 2 months ago
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Dyson Invests £5 Million To Create 'Intelligent Domestic Robots'

hyades1 Ssssssuction (125 comments)

The basement-dwelling subset of the Slashdot community are praying they just don't make it smart enough to talk about...alternative uses for a vaccuum.

about 2 months ago
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Slashdot Tries Something New; Audience Responds!

hyades1 Another try at commenting... (2219 comments)

Slashdot's not particularly good for long back-and-forth exchanges, and it doesn't have the most modern-looking interface. That's a good thing. Because the commenting approach is STILL head and shoulders above most of what's happening now. Part of the Slashdot attraction is its quirkiness in a sea of one size fits all websites.

You're losing that.

This looks just like a hundred other sites, with a tuck here and a poke there to make it look marginally original. The commenting structure genuinely sucks. And it looks to me like it was designed to suck. It isn't that you need a few tweaks to fix little problems. The direction you've chosen is WRONG. I suspect it was chosen because some jackhole who uses terms like "monetize" and "accounting noise" got hold of the reins, and intends to Huffpost the place.

But hey, who am I to say it sucks like a tornado on meth? I've only been coming here for a few years.

about 2 months ago
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What Killed the Great Beasts of North America?

hyades1 Giant beavers are extinct? (214 comments)

I'm pretty sure my buddy's dating one.

about 3 months ago
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FileZilla Has an Evil Twin That Steals FTP Logins

hyades1 Re:That's not the only place you'll find these dll (197 comments)

Thanks for the information. I've found that a heads-up on certain file names can be quite helpful, however. If a particular file name has been targeted by nasty people, I'll just submit the one on machine for analysis by one of the many on-line anti-malware sites that attend to such things.

As it works out, I've learned that according to several sources the specific DLL's on my system are OK. They're where they belong, they're exactly the right size and contain exactly what they should contain...nothing more, nothing less.

about 3 months ago
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FileZilla Has an Evil Twin That Steals FTP Logins

hyades1 That's not the only place you'll find these dll's (197 comments)

I found both of them in TOR browser software and the pro edition of Easeus Partition Master 9.1.1 (legally obtained, not pirated).

So is there something inherently wrong with dll's bearing that name, or are they OK except when they crop up in Filezilla?

about 3 months ago
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Chrome Is the New C Runtime

hyades1 Re:Aside from the obvious security issue... (196 comments)

And you sound like a hobo who gets most of their calories from all the semen you guzzle in public toilets.

So how about you get back on your knees and have some breakfast.

about 3 months ago
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Chrome Is the New C Runtime

hyades1 Aside from the obvious security issue... (196 comments)

...why would any sane person build their whole business on Google, with its reputation for pulling the plug on projects for no obvious reason, little or no warning, and absolutely no interest in granting stays of execution?

Seems like a recipe for disaster.

about 3 months ago
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Irish Politician Calls For Crackdown On Open Source Internet Browsers

hyades1 Re:Good luck with that, King Canute (335 comments)

Old people? You need to open your eyes.

When you run into one of those nasty little fascists who have no respect for civil rights and damned little compassion, you can pretty much bet it's a 20-something.

And my buddy's 83-year-old father knows a hell of a lot more about computer hardware and software than most people I know aged 15 to 35. Among other things, he's digitized and sorted generations of photographs, sketches and Super-8 films. He's turned a selection of them into some really excellent movies, and he's set up a data base that's both flexible and easy to search covering families, family trees, friends, events and much more.

If you want a security nightmare, let a teenager loose on the family computer. Clueless little shytes, for the most part.

about 3 months ago

Submissions

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Verizon Intends to Share Your Personal Information

hyades1 hyades1 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

hyades1 writes "Gizmodo reports that Verizon is sending out notification letters infested with virtually-indecipherable legalese. In their sneaky, underhanded way, they're informing you that you have 45 days to opt out of their plan to share your personal data with "affiliates, agents and parent companies". That data can include, but isn't limited to, "services purchased (including specific calls you make and receive), billing info, technical info and location info."

If you view your statement on-line, you won't even get the letter. You'll have to access your account and view your messages. However, Read Write Web says the link provided there, called the "Customer Proprietary Network Information Notice", was listed as "not available."



No doubt Verizon would like to reassure you that everyone they're going to hand your personal data over to will have your best interests at heart."

Link to Original Source
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Get Out Of Sprint Free

hyades1 hyades1 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

hyades1 writes "Gizmodo says Sprint quietly tacked 25 cents onto its administration fees. This means you can get out of a contract with them and not have to pay the Early Termination Fee. It's suggested that they'll try to weasel out of it once they realize people are onto them, so you'll apparently have to stick to your guns.



http://i.gizmodo.com/5134918/get-out-of-your-sprint-contract-etf-free-until-the-end-of-the-month"

Link to Original Source
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Location Spoofing Possible with WiFi Devices

hyades1 hyades1 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

hyades1 writes "Location Spoofing Possible With WiFi Devices: Positioning System Used By IPhone/iPod Breached



http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080414145659.htm



ScienceDaily (Apr. 16, 2008) — Apple iPhone and iPod (touch) support a new self-localization feature that uses known locations of wireless access points as well as the device's own ability to detect access points. Now researchers at ETH Zurich/Swiss Federal Institute of Technology have demonstrated that positions displayed by the devices using this system can be falsified, making the use of this self-localization system unsuitable in a number of security- and safety-critical applications."

Link to Original Source
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The New IT Guy Wants Vista

hyades1 hyades1 writes  |  about 6 years ago

hyades1 writes "Here's the situation: A mid-size Canadian law firm running the usual law software (Amicus or something like it) hires an IT guy from their computer contractor. The guy immediately asks to install Vista as the operating system whenever it becomes necessary to replace a PC. There's zero chance the firm will upgrade all its computers at once, so the change to Vista would take at least a year, more likely two. I'm told the IT guy has no clue about the software needs of the people doing the lawyering, but wants to make the change from XP (which they're happy with) anyway.



Some employees have said they're already run ragged, and don't have the time or resources to deal with the inevitable growing pains of a new (apparently cranky) OS. One has heard me bitch about my few direct encounters with Vista and some of the things I've seen about it on SlashDot.



Among the potential problems I see:



I've heard Vista doesn't always play nicely with older hardware (the firm scans and prints thousands of letters and documents every month). If Vista decided it didn't like some of the printers or scanners, the consequences would be serious, and would put a lot of stress on the secretaries and clerks (especially if the affected hardware was all on one floor).



Vista is quick to shut you out when it thinks you shouldn't be doing something. Telling their major client, "My computer won't let me have that information. I'll have to call you back," would be a disaster.

There's more, of course, but I'm sure you get the point.



My personal view is that the IT guy sees an opportunity for unlimited job security at the expense of everybody else in the company. However, I'm not a computer person and I don't have the chops to question his decision.



Can somebody point me towards "slap it down on the boss's desk" arguments and backing documentation indicating that Vista is not the way for this firm to go? I've done some searching, but have found mostly anecdotal evidence indicating that Vista should be avoided like the plague. That won't cut it against a guy who can lapse into techno-speak. Can the firm keep XP going until Vista's replacement comes along?



Any help will be most humbly appreciated."
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He died HOW???

hyades1 hyades1 writes  |  more than 6 years ago

hyades1 (1149581) writes "UPI reports that the deputy mayor of New Delhi plummeted to his death during a tussle with aggressive monkeys. http://www.newsdaily.com/TopNews/UPI-1-20071022-20513500-bc-india-monkeys-crn.xml Deputy Mayor S.S. Bajwa was attacked by monkeys while standing on the balcony of his residence Saturday and fell to the ground during the ensuing struggle, CNN-IBN reports. Bajwa was taken to hospital, where he later succumbed to his injuries. Here, for the first time anywhere, is solid, documented proof that spanking the monkey can kill you."
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Computer Vision

hyades1 hyades1 writes  |  more than 6 years ago

hyades1 writes "There may be a revolution coming in the field of computer vision systems. The ability to recognize 3D reality from 2D photographs and the use of context to make reasonable assumptions about perceived objects http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071017174328.htm could solve some major problems that have limited the ability of machines to perform visually-oriented tasks humans do without thinking. A major problem with robots that "see" is that they don't use common sense to quickly discard useless alternatives. Using a little-known Google Labs widget, computer scientists from UC San Diego and UCLA have brought common sense to an automated image labeling system. Basically, it's the ability to use context to help identify objects in photographs. For example, if a conventional automated object identifier has labeled a person, a tennis racket, a tennis court and a lemon in a photo, the new post-processing context check will re-label the lemon as a tennis ball. "We think our paper is the first to bring external semantic context to the problem of object recognition," said computer science professor Serge Belongie from UC San Diego.

Carnegie Mellon researchers, meanwhile, have found a way for computers to recognize real 3D objects they have previously "seen" in 2D photographs http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/06/060614091016.htm. Using machine learning techniques, Robotics Institute researchers Alexei Efros and Martial Hebert, along with graduate student Derek Hoiem, have taught computers how to spot the visual cues that differentiate between vertical surfaces and horizontal surfaces in photographs of outdoor scenes. They've even developed a program that allows the computer to automatically generate 3-D reconstructions of scenes based on a single image. "The technique provides an approximate sense of the scene, a qualitative grasp of the structure of a scene," said Efros, assistant professor of computer science and robotics."

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