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Comments

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Adobe's Latest Zero-Day Exploit Repurposed, Targeting Adult Websites

hyades1 This sounds serious! (201 comments)

So do action shots of me in my Captain Cocktastic costume (girlfriend's crotchless panties, Captain America helmet, red cape, and big, hairy winter boots), leaping to the attack over a suspiciously-shaped beanbag chair, constitute pornography, comedy or educational material?

If the first is true, should I worry that I may fall victim to this security threat should the pictures accidentally become public?

3 days ago
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US Government Lurked On Silk Road For Over a Year

hyades1 Re:Your Tax Dollars At Work (129 comments)

Thanks for an interesting perspective on this.

about two weeks ago
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US Government Lurked On Silk Road For Over a Year

hyades1 Re:Your Tax Dollars At Work (129 comments)

You proved your opinion is worthless, and you know exactly how. So I'll repeat myself: fuck off. You're a shill, probably paid by some government enforcement agency one way or another.

about two weeks ago
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US Government Lurked On Silk Road For Over a Year

hyades1 Re:Your Tax Dollars At Work (129 comments)

Your comment isn't worthy of a serious response.

Fuck off.

There are adults here, and you don't belong.

about two weeks ago
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Gunmen Kill 12, Wound 7 At French Magazine HQ

hyades1 Re: Let's ban all guns! (1350 comments)

Would I be correct to assume I'm seeing evidence of yet another conservative American somehow managing to raise himself momentarily up from the fetid swamp of willful ignorance and blind, vacuous stupidity that is his home to excrete more evidence of the decline of a once-proud nation onto the public stage?

Dude, you should just post a link to a YouTube video of a dog having a dump and save everybody time.

about two weeks ago
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US Government Lurked On Silk Road For Over a Year

hyades1 Your Tax Dollars At Work (129 comments)

So how many millions of dollars did this "team of U.S. law enforcement agencies" spend in a whole year of fattening themselves up at the taxpayer's expense?

And what did they accomplish? They knocked Silk Road off the net for a few months, and in so doing helped it improve its security for next time. Now it's up and running again, making scads of money for the operators, and thumbing its nose at the U.S.

Oh, well, at least long-suffering taxpayers can happily contemplate about all the boats, cottages and retirement homes they've bought for Norbert the Nark and his Homeland Security buddies.

about two weeks ago
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Google Sees Biggest Search Traffic Drop Since 2009 As Yahoo Gains Ground

hyades1 Re:Google Censorship (155 comments)

I think your grasp of this subject is flawed. The situation is exactly as I described it.

about three weeks ago
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Google Sees Biggest Search Traffic Drop Since 2009 As Yahoo Gains Ground

hyades1 Re:Google Censorship (155 comments)

It seems I'm saying "Thank You" a lot as a result of my comment. You definitely earned one. And thanks, too, for going the extra mile to provide an excellent example of the way their new, censorship-friendly search works.

As I said, I don't spend a lot of time looking for porn. On the other hand, I don't like some search engine screwing with MY search results because they're intent on sucking up to religious types and parents who can't be bothered to actually parent their kids.

about three weeks ago
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Google Sees Biggest Search Traffic Drop Since 2009 As Yahoo Gains Ground

hyades1 Re:Google Censorship (155 comments)

Thank you for this! Your help is very much appreciated.

about three weeks ago
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Google Sees Biggest Search Traffic Drop Since 2009 As Yahoo Gains Ground

hyades1 Google Censorship (155 comments)

As a resident of Canada, I find that Google has put a search filter in place that I can't get around. Basically, it makes me type in specific words like "breasts" or "naked" if I want to see picture results including such things. I don't spend a lot of time looking for pornography, but I don't want to worry that 10% of the the Ontario Museum's art collection is off limits to me unless I specifically go on a search for boobies.

No doubt this protects Miss Grundy and her fellow church ladies from the sight of the occasional naked breast, but I find it offensive and paternalistic, and as a result, I've cut back quite a lot on my use of Google.

about three weeks ago
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Hubble Takes Amazing New Images of Andromeda, Pillars of Creation

hyades1 The Price of Art (97 comments)

Average out the cost of designing, building and orbiting a newer, better Hubble across all the people in the world who have a few extra bucks and an appreciation of that iconic photo as art...worthwhile for no other reason than for us to stare at it and be profoundly moved.

I wonder how much it would cost each person to "git 'er done".

about three weeks ago
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What Language Will the World Speak In 2115?

hyades1 Sorry to be Captain Obvious, but... (578 comments)

I suspect it's far more likely we'll have something close to a "universal translator" that will make it possible to speak with anybody else in the language of their choice in real time. Thus, there won't be nearly as much incentive to learn one particular language in order to communicate in whatever happens to be the lingua franca of the day.

about a month ago
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War Tech the US, Russia, China and India All Want: Hypersonic Weapons

hyades1 Re:Hypersonic weapons lead to nuclear war ? (290 comments)

I'm curious: did anyone ever notice how Iran is a modern, safe country? Or did anyone ever give Chileans credit for ousting the American puppet, who was still facing war crimes charges at the time of his death...a man who looted the Chilean treasury in the time-honoured tradition of dictators everywhere?

Hmmm....food for thought. On second thought, don't think - let's just uncritically parrot what we read somewhere, because it MUST be right.

about a month ago
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War Tech the US, Russia, China and India All Want: Hypersonic Weapons

hyades1 Re:Hypersonic weapons lead to nuclear war ? (290 comments)

I guess setting up puppet governments in places like Iran and Chile doesn't count, as far as you're concerned? Or failing to do so, such as in the Bay of Pigs fiasco?

I always have to chuckle when I see comments like yours, made by Americans who are so blindingly ignorant of their own history.

about 1 month ago
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"Star Trek 3" To Be Helmed By "Fast & Furious" Franchise Director Justin Lin

hyades1 Re:Waste of Time (332 comments)

I never have a goddamned moderator point when I really need one. You'd get it..."Insightful" or "Informative", not sure which.

about a month ago
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Monochromatic Light As a Species-selective Insecticide

hyades1 Some work may still be needed (44 comments)

Apparently several Winnipeg mosquitoes were observed slathering themselves with DEET and lying under the 417 nm to get a little colour on their underbellies.

A researcher who attempted to turn the light off was beaten badly, and is now reporting that several Goliath beetles used in another experiment now appear to be pregnant. Also the cat.

about 2 months ago
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The Sony Pictures Hack Was Even Worse Than Everyone Thought

hyades1 Ah, Karma (528 comments)

Remember back a few years ago, when Sony decided the best way to combat piracy was to install a rootkit on the machines of anybody who played one of their CD's?

I hope I can be forgiven for reminding them of a couple of good old adages. Adages like, "What goes around comes around", "Karma's a bitch", and "Sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander".

And I hope they'll forgive me for my complete lack of sympathy.

about 2 months ago
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UK Police To Publicly Shame Drunk Drivers On Twitter This Christmas

hyades1 Re:Bad Drunk! Naughty Drunk!!! (256 comments)

It's not that simple, especially in the UK. Even in Canada, the truth isn't an absolute defense against libel.

about 2 months ago
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UK Police To Publicly Shame Drunk Drivers On Twitter This Christmas

hyades1 Bad Drunk! Naughty Drunk!!! (256 comments)

I can't wait 'til the first time one of the people who's been shamed after being charged is found innocent in court. Unlike the US, England's courts take a very dim view of smearing someone's reputation unjustly.

I suspect a couple of nice, fat payouts in the wake of libel convictions will put a stop to this nonsense.

about a month ago
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How Intel and Micron May Finally Kill the Hard Disk Drive

hyades1 Re:I like both (438 comments)

Thanks for the information. I guess I wasn't too clear on one thing, though: I do back up, but my work is such that if the last backup was an hour before, I lose an hour of work I won't get back, or even more.

And I'm one of those people who actually do require a lot of storage space...and have no desire to have it beyond my care and control. I do professional photography and video. Often, I have five or six versions of a photo on the go at once. I'll want to keep all of them, and any modifications I make...not so much colour correction as actual content...will probably proceed a lot further on two or three versions. I'm not an idiot about keeping my data drive defragged, and nothing goes on my boot drive (which is a 300G SCSI...you'd probably be surprised at how fast it is) except the OS, installed programs and stuff I'm actually working on. I have as little going on in the background as I can get away with. That means my security is cloud-based plus passive.

And I have to say, I've had lots better luck with hard drives than you. My machines are on 24-7, and I don't let my data drives sleep. I've never had one last less than 3 years. Most last easily twice that.

about 2 months ago

Submissions

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Verizon Intends to Share Your Personal Information

hyades1 hyades1 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

hyades1 writes "Gizmodo reports that Verizon is sending out notification letters infested with virtually-indecipherable legalese. In their sneaky, underhanded way, they're informing you that you have 45 days to opt out of their plan to share your personal data with "affiliates, agents and parent companies". That data can include, but isn't limited to, "services purchased (including specific calls you make and receive), billing info, technical info and location info."

If you view your statement on-line, you won't even get the letter. You'll have to access your account and view your messages. However, Read Write Web says the link provided there, called the "Customer Proprietary Network Information Notice", was listed as "not available."



No doubt Verizon would like to reassure you that everyone they're going to hand your personal data over to will have your best interests at heart."

Link to Original Source
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Get Out Of Sprint Free

hyades1 hyades1 writes  |  about 6 years ago

hyades1 writes "Gizmodo says Sprint quietly tacked 25 cents onto its administration fees. This means you can get out of a contract with them and not have to pay the Early Termination Fee. It's suggested that they'll try to weasel out of it once they realize people are onto them, so you'll apparently have to stick to your guns.



http://i.gizmodo.com/5134918/get-out-of-your-sprint-contract-etf-free-until-the-end-of-the-month"

Link to Original Source
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Location Spoofing Possible with WiFi Devices

hyades1 hyades1 writes  |  more than 6 years ago

hyades1 writes "Location Spoofing Possible With WiFi Devices: Positioning System Used By IPhone/iPod Breached



http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080414145659.htm



ScienceDaily (Apr. 16, 2008) — Apple iPhone and iPod (touch) support a new self-localization feature that uses known locations of wireless access points as well as the device's own ability to detect access points. Now researchers at ETH Zurich/Swiss Federal Institute of Technology have demonstrated that positions displayed by the devices using this system can be falsified, making the use of this self-localization system unsuitable in a number of security- and safety-critical applications."

Link to Original Source
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The New IT Guy Wants Vista

hyades1 hyades1 writes  |  more than 6 years ago

hyades1 writes "Here's the situation: A mid-size Canadian law firm running the usual law software (Amicus or something like it) hires an IT guy from their computer contractor. The guy immediately asks to install Vista as the operating system whenever it becomes necessary to replace a PC. There's zero chance the firm will upgrade all its computers at once, so the change to Vista would take at least a year, more likely two. I'm told the IT guy has no clue about the software needs of the people doing the lawyering, but wants to make the change from XP (which they're happy with) anyway.



Some employees have said they're already run ragged, and don't have the time or resources to deal with the inevitable growing pains of a new (apparently cranky) OS. One has heard me bitch about my few direct encounters with Vista and some of the things I've seen about it on SlashDot.



Among the potential problems I see:



I've heard Vista doesn't always play nicely with older hardware (the firm scans and prints thousands of letters and documents every month). If Vista decided it didn't like some of the printers or scanners, the consequences would be serious, and would put a lot of stress on the secretaries and clerks (especially if the affected hardware was all on one floor).



Vista is quick to shut you out when it thinks you shouldn't be doing something. Telling their major client, "My computer won't let me have that information. I'll have to call you back," would be a disaster.

There's more, of course, but I'm sure you get the point.



My personal view is that the IT guy sees an opportunity for unlimited job security at the expense of everybody else in the company. However, I'm not a computer person and I don't have the chops to question his decision.



Can somebody point me towards "slap it down on the boss's desk" arguments and backing documentation indicating that Vista is not the way for this firm to go? I've done some searching, but have found mostly anecdotal evidence indicating that Vista should be avoided like the plague. That won't cut it against a guy who can lapse into techno-speak. Can the firm keep XP going until Vista's replacement comes along?



Any help will be most humbly appreciated."
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He died HOW???

hyades1 hyades1 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

hyades1 (1149581) writes "UPI reports that the deputy mayor of New Delhi plummeted to his death during a tussle with aggressive monkeys. http://www.newsdaily.com/TopNews/UPI-1-20071022-20513500-bc-india-monkeys-crn.xml Deputy Mayor S.S. Bajwa was attacked by monkeys while standing on the balcony of his residence Saturday and fell to the ground during the ensuing struggle, CNN-IBN reports. Bajwa was taken to hospital, where he later succumbed to his injuries. Here, for the first time anywhere, is solid, documented proof that spanking the monkey can kill you."
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Computer Vision

hyades1 hyades1 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

hyades1 writes "There may be a revolution coming in the field of computer vision systems. The ability to recognize 3D reality from 2D photographs and the use of context to make reasonable assumptions about perceived objects http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071017174328.htm could solve some major problems that have limited the ability of machines to perform visually-oriented tasks humans do without thinking. A major problem with robots that "see" is that they don't use common sense to quickly discard useless alternatives. Using a little-known Google Labs widget, computer scientists from UC San Diego and UCLA have brought common sense to an automated image labeling system. Basically, it's the ability to use context to help identify objects in photographs. For example, if a conventional automated object identifier has labeled a person, a tennis racket, a tennis court and a lemon in a photo, the new post-processing context check will re-label the lemon as a tennis ball. "We think our paper is the first to bring external semantic context to the problem of object recognition," said computer science professor Serge Belongie from UC San Diego.

Carnegie Mellon researchers, meanwhile, have found a way for computers to recognize real 3D objects they have previously "seen" in 2D photographs http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/06/060614091016.htm. Using machine learning techniques, Robotics Institute researchers Alexei Efros and Martial Hebert, along with graduate student Derek Hoiem, have taught computers how to spot the visual cues that differentiate between vertical surfaces and horizontal surfaces in photographs of outdoor scenes. They've even developed a program that allows the computer to automatically generate 3-D reconstructions of scenes based on a single image. "The technique provides an approximate sense of the scene, a qualitative grasp of the structure of a scene," said Efros, assistant professor of computer science and robotics."

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