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Study Shows Direct Brain Interface Between Humans

iMadeGhostzilla Re:That's Kinda Creepy... (110 comments)

I would imagine it feels like the reflex-test kick in the knee -- you feel the sensation but are surprised it is happening since you are not willing it, and you're merely observing the process.

Taking it a step further, I imagine one day when someone else can press a trigger to create a vague thought or image in your mind, you'd feel the same -- feel the mental sensation but since you'd not be willing it, you'd be just observing it. (Perhaps similar with eg. a hallucinations? Also something you did not invite in your mental space, it just occurs.)

about three weeks ago
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Denuvo DRM Challenges Game Crackers

iMadeGhostzilla Re:What's the process? (187 comments)

I'm curious what happens if there are multiple validations checks and if they don't all have immediate visible consequence. E.g. if some basic function in the game such as moving to the left deteriorates in the minutes or even hours/days after the validation check has failed, or if the failed check forces glitches downstream that make the game unplayable? In other words, how do you know if you have removed the protection (esp. if the game has genuine bugs)?

about three weeks ago
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Researchers At Brown University Shattered a Quantum Wave Function

iMadeGhostzilla Re:umm.. what? (150 comments)

Thanks. "The bump is the rope; the wave and bump are one" is a good way to put it. I found a paper by Art Hobson of UARK claiming that "There are no particles, there are only fields" (http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1204/1204.4616.pdf), this sounds similar. So phenomena appear to us as particles, and we model those phenomena as waves to predict how/where/when they will manifest to us. Seen that way, I think the double slit experiment isn't any more mysterious than any "ordinary" electron behavior, but it's always present as "this is where things get weird."

about a month ago
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Black Swan Author: Genetically Modified Organisms Risk Global Ruin

iMadeGhostzilla Re:A mathematician commenting on biology (432 comments)

True, humans add multiplication to that exponential growth.

I am also pro GM research however, I do believe that GM knowledge can come in handy some day in different situations, and to be the devil's advocate, I wonder if we can reach that knowledge if we are rational enough about GM and use it only when justified. Kind of like, you need to play with fire and get burned a little in the process before you understand how to use it properly.

about a month ago
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Researchers At Brown University Shattered a Quantum Wave Function

iMadeGhostzilla Re:umm.. what? (150 comments)

Maybe you'd be a good person to ask -- the collapse is the end of superposition, but where does it "begin"? We say that an electron passes through the double slit which sounds like it is a definitive single particle/wave, but I'm guessing that electron itself is one possible state of the part of the quantum system ie. of the cathode that emitted the electron or not, the cathode itself being a part of the larger system and so on. So the electron that may or may not have been emitted from the cathode may or may not have passed through the say left slit, and only when we look we can say yes there was an electron and it passed through the left slit. But when we are not looking, are there any "actual" electrons to begin with or is everything around us all superpositions of superpositions of states to infinity, appearing in one way or another only when measured?

Similar and maybe easier question to answer may be, how does entanglement begin? Or maybe these questions have no meaning at any time we are not looking/measuring?

about a month ago
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Black Swan Author: Genetically Modified Organisms Risk Global Ruin

iMadeGhostzilla Re:Nonsense. Again. (432 comments)

Do the diff of the genetic material before and after, in the case of 1) "natural" mutations, 2) selective breeding, and 3) GM. And don't look for just the number of "lines" of code, but look at the structure and correlation among the changes. Then, apply exponential growth to the diffs -- and the fact that we cannot possibly predict the effect of either 10, 20 or 100 years downstream, and you'll see what's different.

about a month ago
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Black Swan Author: Genetically Modified Organisms Risk Global Ruin

iMadeGhostzilla Re:A mathematician commenting on biology (432 comments)

The risk is (meaningfully, not formally) non-zero because GMOs ride the most potent distribution mechanism in existence for free -- natural replication and multiplication. An error in a nuclear reactor doesn't affect other nuclear reactors, but a "faulty" GM organism with potentially bad consequences (for us) can be everywhere just a few generations down. And unlike a computer virus for example, we may not be equipped to deal with the spread in the material worlds.

A fair question would be why that is different from "natural" mutations of living things. (Which could also wipe us out some day.) The answer, as I understand it, is that natural mutations introduce a small delta of change at once, so there is more opportunity for the entire biosystem to adapt to them or neutralize them if harmful for the system. With GMOs, the delta of change is large and very structured, and that delta propagates at the same speed as the small "natural" deltas.

"Natural" is btw only a statistical description. The processes we call natural have in the past occurred many orders of magnitude more times than those we call "artificial" and so their consequence is far more known.

about a month ago
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Black Swan Author: Genetically Modified Organisms Risk Global Ruin

iMadeGhostzilla Re:I'm all in favor... (432 comments)

And the other key part is that the danger of potential consequences should be weighed against the expected benefit. Eg. if we are about to starve because a disease is wiping out corn, it's better to risk with GMO corn that to have no corn. And likewise we shouldn't introduce potentially huge unknown risks that could take decades to show -- like trans fat, if we can even trace those back -- for small benefits like 10% lower price or slightly longer shelf life.

But you're right, we in the modern society are unable to see things deeper, even using our own logic. I was somewhat open before reading Antifragility and still felt shock and hostility to Taleb's ideas, took me quite some time to start digesting them. In some ways those aren't necessarily his ideas even, it is a wisdom of humanity that has been lost temporarily. But he gets the credit for reminding us of those despite the hate he gets.

about a month ago
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Soda Pop Damages Your Cells' Telomeres

iMadeGhostzilla Re:Overly broad? (422 comments)

I think in your question lies the essence of the problem: "What element in their test soda is so harmful that it has such a dramatic effect?" You are making an assumption that a food (as it were) can be reduced to its individual ingredients and studied that way. This has been shown many times to be false -- for example equal amounts of fructose in a fruit juice and in fresh fruit have been found to have different effects because (supposedly) fiber in fresh fruit slows down absorption of sugars. (Maybe that's how it works, maybe not -- all we have observed is that people who drink fruit juices tend to have larger waists than people who only eat fresh fruit.)

The system is too complex to understand. Soda is invented foodstuff, foreign to our evolutionary mechanisms. The only reasonable decision about it is to consume it only when it has a clear benefit (lifts spirits, prevents you from fainting if you are starved etc.), because we don't know what the potential unknown harms are. The harms become known (or suspected, as is the case here) only with time -- a long time.

about a month ago
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Torvalds: I Made Community-Building Mistakes With Linux

iMadeGhostzilla Re:Has it been working so far? (387 comments)

Sorry but "could have been" is nonsense that only works with parallel universes. Strong, successful open-source projects are rare compared to the number of open-source projects in general, and Linus delivered on that front. That is the only valid point for comparison IMO, and from that point he deserves a thankyou.

about a month ago
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Cyanogen Inc. Turns Down Google, Seeing $1 Billion Valuation

iMadeGhostzilla Re:Google just pissy (107 comments)

Thank you for this -- I just assumed there's no AdBlock on Chrome because Google wouldn't allow it, and didn't even look, until now. Installed and running fine. My respect for Google just went up a notch.

about 2 months ago
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New Research Casts Doubt On the "10,000 Hour Rule" of Expertise

iMadeGhostzilla Re:All this psychological research... (192 comments)

That's the conclusion that the article makes. One of the authors of the article is also a co-author of the study, and together they don't just give information, they interpret it for you:

"Wouldn’t it be better to just act as if we are equal, evidence to the contrary notwithstanding? That way, no people will be discouraged from chasing their dreams—competing in the Olympics or performing at Carnegie Hall or winning a Nobel Prize. The answer is no"

As for the quality of the information -- the first cited study says "Argentinian chess players (N = 104), ranging from weak amateurs to grandmasters, completed a questionnaire measuring variables including individual and group practice, starting age, and handedness." Questionnaires are a terribly unreliable method for investigating objective reality, I think you would agree. But the main study (coauthored by the article coauthor) uses *meta-analysis*: it looks at an aggregation of data filled with all kinds of noise and self-reported "facts" in order to see the patterns the researchers are looking for. Take a look at http://scottbarrykaufman.com/w... and have fun.

I think the original 10,000 hours conclusion was probably no more scientific or applicable than this one; but it had an inspiring, useful message: work hard and that which interests you and something good will come out of it. This study/article, while being based on almost surely unreliable information, dares to say, "it may not matter if you work really hard at that which interests you, because you genetics may stand in the way." Like the Rorschach test, the way these researchers interpret essentially random data says more about the researchers than about the meaning of their interpretation.

(The second conclusion they listed at the end of the article is I'll admit not that bad. But it all just reinforces the idea this is all a waste of time -- both the 10,000 and the refuting of 10,000.)

about 2 months ago
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David Cameron Says Brits Should Be Taught Imperial Measures

iMadeGhostzilla Re:FP? (942 comments)

One advantage of a mile is how you estimate time when driving on a freeway -- if your exit is 2 1/2 miles away, you know it's also roughly 2 1/2 minutes away, since you're driving roughly 60 miles per hour (in the US, 65 is the limit, mostly). If your exit is 4km away and you are driving around 110km/h, it takes some effort to do the math.

about 2 months ago
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New Research Casts Doubt On the "10,000 Hour Rule" of Expertise

iMadeGhostzilla All this psychological research... (192 comments)

is doing more harm than good, is what I'm beginning to think. Even if it didn't make logical errors like other posters said, what is the point of their conclusion that we should pretend we're all equal and should not chase our dreams? Should one give up on their dream because their genetics *might* not be up to the task in a way that is not obvious to the person, according to one study? And even if the claim in the study is accurate, should one give up on the *process* of chasing their dreams because they may not become a master? Because no good can come up from opening new horizons in one's life unless some predetermined goal is achieved?

This "science" is worse than useless.

about 2 months ago
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Sci-fi Predictions, True and False (Video 2)

iMadeGhostzilla As summarized by Eddie Izzard: (27 comments)

"But finally tonight, finally tonight I just want to talk about the future. The future. Where will the future be? Science Fiction writers, they write it down, they write it down in books. And then it becomes films, and then it all comes to pass, like those doors in Star Trek (makes whooshing sound) we've got them now! That's about it! But that's happened."

about 2 months ago
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How Our Botched Understanding of "Science" Ruins Everything

iMadeGhostzilla Re:In lost the will to live ... (795 comments)

I agree. Someone said that the point of texts like the Bible is not to speak about the physical reality ie. the "objective truth" but about the psychological truth -- for example "let there be ..." process of creation shows that in order for a concept to exist in our mind we have to have a word for it.

about 2 months ago
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How Our Botched Understanding of "Science" Ruins Everything

iMadeGhostzilla Re:In lost the will to live ... (795 comments)

Hehe good one -- a scientific theory that supports the possibility of Biblical miracles hasn't been proven yet. :-) It keeps the original argument though, we can't in principle reject the accounts of miracles based on the current theory (like we can the 6,000 years old Earth), because those are not incompatible.

about 2 months ago
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How Our Botched Understanding of "Science" Ruins Everything

iMadeGhostzilla Re:In lost the will to live ... (795 comments)

Technically, Jesus walking on the water is not impossible according to the current physics, just highly improbable. There's a nonzero possibility that the fundamental particles that made the water have spontaneously assumed a configuration in which a person can walk on the surface without sinking, and they kept that configuration for the duration of the walk.

Same goes for parting the seas, and pretty much any other "miracle" you can imagine.

about 2 months ago
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Nvidia Sinks Moon Landing Hoax Using Virtual Light

iMadeGhostzilla Just watch "Why we left the Earth" series (275 comments)

Excellent documentary (free with Amazon Prime), shows why they went so many times. Also leaves no trace of doubt how it was done.

about 2 months ago
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Oculus Rift CEO Says Classrooms of the Future Will Be In VR Goggles

iMadeGhostzilla Anytime someone says this or that *will* be... (182 comments)

I stop paying attention to what they say and start paying attention to the person and think what their motivation may be.

about 2 months ago

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