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Comments

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Male Scent Molecules May Be Compromising Biomedical Research

identity0 Re:Why Male? (274 comments)

But why male scientists?

about 4 months ago
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1.21 PetaFLOPS (RPeak) Supercomputer Created With EC2

identity0 Re:Old Joke (54 comments)

You want old jokes?

Imagine a Beowulf cluster of these....

about 9 months ago
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CIA Pays AT&T Millions To Voluntarily Provide Call Data

identity0 Re:What does AT&T get in return? (107 comments)

Their executive's stocks don't get scrutinized for insider trading, as happened to a certain Qwest executive...

about 9 months ago
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Critics Reassess Starship Troopers As a Misunderstood Masterpiece

identity0 Re:You what? (726 comments)

Look, I was in my teens when I saw it in the theater, and I was not a fan or defender of Heinlein's (still have not read any of his books).

I still thought the movie sucked.

I got that it was satire, in fact I thought it was trying too hard to be satire. There was no subtlety and none of it was clever or funny. Nor did it lampoon the military in ways that actually challenged militarism or war on an intellectual level, it just made fun of the surface aspects of it (hurrr grunts are dumb, look at this parody of propaganda, etc). It felt like the director was just trying to bash his views onto the viewer without any introspection or intellect. Basically my reaction.

You know your movie sucks when a teenage boy thinks it lacks subtlety and intellect.

about 9 months ago
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Joining Lavabit Et Al, Groklaw Shuts Down Because of NSA Dragnet

identity0 Re:It was a myth (986 comments)

What? No, this is objectively not true: The US still doesn't have the equivalent to the UK's Official Secrets Act, for example. The UK law can compel people who are not part of the military or contracted civillians to destroy data or be jailed for revealing state secrets, whereas US law can only punish those who were directly contractually obligatged to keep state secrets, like Manning and Snowden.

Notably, the Guardian itself has said would not be able to report on equivalent disclosures about the UK under their official secrets act, but they are protected by the First Amendment in the US.

As for the past, the US was definitely far freer than most of western Europe through WWII, not having a permanent secret intelligence service for example. But since the end of the Cold War, the human rights situation in Euroope has probably caught up with the US, and exceeded it in some ways.

1 year,16 hours
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Joining Lavabit Et Al, Groklaw Shuts Down Because of NSA Dragnet

identity0 Re:And (986 comments)

I'll get the grits, you can pour it down your pants to quell your sadness.

1 year,17 hours
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Joining Lavabit Et Al, Groklaw Shuts Down Because of NSA Dragnet

identity0 Re:Where will this end? (986 comments)

Agreed, but I feel that the American public will not care until an actual "old media" site or physical newspaper/TV/radio station goes off the air.

Which is not inconcievable, nowadays.

1 year,17 hours
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USA Calling For the Extradition of Snowden

identity0 Re:It wont do much, but at least register interest (955 comments)

Just remember, you can't pardon someone who hasn't been convicted. Maybe you can give immunity from prosecution, but I'm not sure the President can do that. Knowing Obama, he'll have him prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.

about a year ago
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Facebook Suffers Actual Cloud In Oregon Datacenter

identity0 Obligatory (83 comments)

Welcome to Oregon, it rains a lot.

about a year ago
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Inside PRISM: Why the Government Hates Encryption

identity0 Re:it just occurred to me (457 comments)

Not to mention internal human rights or freedom of speech, freedom of thought...

about a year ago
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Inside PRISM: Why the Government Hates Encryption

identity0 Re:Morons (457 comments)

I think he meant it more in the sense of The Onion's Drugs Win Drugs War.... When you go to war against something, you can lose to it even if the thing doesn't care about winning.

In this case, we went to war with "terror" and we have succeeded in terrorizing ourselves, thus it has won.

about a year ago
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Former FBI Agent: All Digital Communications Stored By US Gov't

identity0 Re:Just how much storage capacity would one requir (621 comments)

No, re-read his comments. He only mentions that they are recording all voice traffic, not all data. He goes on to say that all digital communications is insecure, but not that they're actively recording all data traffic.

Voice comms is very low in bitrate, and it hasn't scaled up exponentially like general internet traffic, so I have no doubt that the technical capability to do what he says exists. Whether they are actually doing it is a separate question.

about a year ago
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BitCoin Value Collapses, Possibly Due To DDoS

identity0 Re:Well the ultimate value of Bitcoin is (605 comments)

I am not a economist, but I am related to one...

While it's technically true to say that "Currency is only worth what people think it's worth" and that it's a socailly-constructed value, you are ignoring the underlying economic reasons why people assign greater value to one than the other.

The value of a US dollar is based on the power and stability of the US economy and Federal Government. No matter how bad things may seem right now for the US economy, it is much better than trusting a random internet craze, and no one doubts that it will be around in 100 years, hence people buy 100 year bonds. Even the currency of a small country like Sweden is a better bet than bitcoin.

I've looked into bitcoin, and while I think the idea is cryptographically sound, there is one problem with the concept: While there are built-in limits to inflation within bitcoin, there is nothing preventing someone else from building "Bitcoin 2" or "Crypto-coins" with the same concept but different keys. If merchants are willing to take bitcoin, what is to prevent them from also accepting any other crypto currency, thus devaluing the whole pool?

The value of currency as an investment is dependent on how much it will be worth in the long run, and while I am sure "bitcoins" will be around in 10 years, what will its value be? Will be around in 100 years?

And this is ignoring the issue this article bring up, that with a newly-consructed pool of currency with much fewer users, it is much more prone to currency manipulation than dollars or euros.

about a year ago
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Leaked: Obama's Rules For Assassinating American Citizens

identity0 Re:"it isn't real, you are a flake" (800 comments)

The counter-argument to that would be that when John Brown attempted an insurrection against the country, they tried him in a court and executed him. When a individual or some conspirators attempt to fight the country, that is well within the bounds of the regular law enforcement.

It's when you have entire governments and literally tens of thousands of men forming an insurrection that you bring out the canons.

about a year and a half ago
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Is 'Brogramming' Killing Requirements Engineering?

identity0 Re:Brogramming??? (432 comments)

Bro, do you ecen code?

about a year and a half ago
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Linus Chews Up Kernel Maintainer For Introducing Userspace Bug

identity0 Re:Still.... (1051 comments)

Not a military member, but from what I understand, the military doles out ass-chewings like that behind closed doors, not in front of the public. Dressing down people in front of the men/women they command or the public is frowned upon because it leads to undermining the chain of command.

Punishments that are viewed by the public, like court-martials have a much more professional air to them. I don't see why Linus couldn't do that, or do his ranting and raving in a personal email to the man instead of a public forum.

about a year and a half ago
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FreeBSD Project Falls Short of Year End Funding Target By Nearly 50%

identity0 Finally.... (245 comments)

After many long years on Slashdot, can I be the first one to actually confirm that FreeBSD is dead?

about a year and a half ago
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Why Iron Dome Might Only Work For Israel

identity0 Re:"some"? (377 comments)

Does your mom count? Because that's the one that said it to me.

about a year and a half ago

Submissions

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MasterCard lifts Wikileaks donation block

identity0 identity0 writes  |  about a year ago

identity0 (77976) writes "Reuters and Russia Today are reporting that MasterCard has unblocked donations to Wikileaks, according to a press release. Their Icelandic data center won a lawsuit against the local credit card processor VALITOR, and their MasterCard account has been activated. Wikileaks says Julian Assange's legal defense is paid from a separate fund. Donations to Wikileaks went down 95 percent after the major credit card companies blocked their account in 2010. Their PayPal account is still frozen."
Link to Original Source
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Japanese police charge 2channel founder over forum posts

identity0 identity0 writes  |  about a year and a half ago

identity0 (77976) writes "According to Japan Probe, Hiroyuki Nishimura, the founder of 2ch.net, has been charged with drug offenses by Japanese police over a forum post made on 2ch in 2010. He is not even accused of making the post, but of failure to have moderators delete it. The post apparently discussed drugs. 2ch.net (also called 2channel) is Japan's biggest forum, with over a million posts a day, of which the post in question was one. The site inspired image board 2chan.net(but is not directly related to it), which spawned copycat English site 4chan.net. More info at Slashdot Japan if you can read Japanese."
Link to Original Source
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Zombie Record For Mexico City

identity0 identity0 writes  |  more than 2 years ago

identity0 (77976) writes "Mexico City now claims to have the world record for the largest 'zombie walk', with nearly 10,000 dressed as zombies participating. This would break the record of Brisbane's zombie walk with 8,000 participants, and the official Guinness record holder of Asbury Park, with 4,093 zombies. No word on if any brains were eaten or dance moves to 'Thriller' were performed at the event."
Link to Original Source
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West African Black Rhinos extinct

identity0 identity0 writes  |  more than 2 years ago

identity0 (77976) writes "The BBC reports that the Western Black Rhino subspecies in West Africa (Diceros bicornis longipes) was declared extinct by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Other populations of rhinos remain, although another species is listed as close to extinction. The main culprit appears to be poaching, to quote from the article Simon Stuart, chair of the IUCN Species Survival Commission: "They had the misfortune of occurring in places where we simply weren't able to get the necessary security in place. You've got to imagine an animal walking around with a gold horn; that's what you're looking at, that's the value". A sad day for all of us."
Link to Original Source
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Open access to exercise data?

identity0 identity0 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

identity0 (77976) writes "A recent Slashdot article about heart rate monitors in schools got me thinking about getting one for my own exercise. It turns out there's a wide range of features, from calorie rate, pedometers, GPS, and PC connectivity. Being a geek, I wanted one that would let me look at my exercise data, and I'm curious what experiences Slashdotters have had with them. Some download data to a proprietary application, so I'm wondering if there are open source alternatives or the data format is easily readable. Others upload data to an online app, and I'm wondering if the data can be pulled off the site or it's forever trapped on their servers. While I'm not paranoid about my data being shared or an open source zealot, I would like to know that I can access my data in the future. Whatever method you guys use to monitor your exercise, I'd love to hear it!"
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Economist online copyright debate

identity0 identity0 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

identity0 (77976) writes "The Economist magazine is holding a online debate on the issue of copyright, with the resolution 'This house believes that existing copyright laws do more harm than good.' currently 69% voted yes, 31% voted no. It is moderated by a tech reporter from the Economist. Law professors represent both sides of the argument, with several guest speakers, and it is open to comments from users. Interestingly, although the Economist is a British magazine, both law professors are American, perhaps a sign of the influence America's law has on global copyrights. The debate will last until May 15th."
Link to Original Source
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Metal Gear Smuggler

identity0 identity0 writes  |  about 6 years ago

identity0 (77976) writes "Konami's military advisor for Metal Gear Solid 4, Tomoaki Iishiba, has been charged with violating export laws by shipping 60 holographic weapon sights to Japan without a license. A blog on export law names these as EOTech model 553. These sights were ordered from a US online site and are civilian-legal. However they may be covered under ITAR export laws, much like strong encryption. Iishiba is something of an oddity, a Japanese-born naturalized citizen who came to the U.S. after seeing the movie "Rambo" and desiring to join the US Army. He has since worked as a liaison officer with the Japanese Defense Forces. The Seattle Post-Intelligencer reports he has been reassigned to other duties pending the case, but is not under arrest. It is not clear if the sights were intended for real weapons or airsoft toys."
Link to Original Source
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Pringles Can Inventor Passes Away, Buried In Can

identity0 identity0 writes  |  more than 6 years ago

identity0 (77976) writes "Now some sad news — according to CNN, the inventor of the Pringles can, Fredric J. Baur, passed away recently. Even in death, however, his invention proved useful. Adding to the list of hacks found for the ubiquitous can, part of the man's cremated remains were interred in one of the cans, as he wished. Let us salute this inventor who helped many Slashdotters with their home projects, not to mention hunger during long coding sessions."
Link to Original Source
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BBC says piracy is piracy

identity0 identity0 writes  |  more than 6 years ago

identity0 (77976) writes "Most people who call copyright infringement 'piracy' defend it on the basis of historical use in that context, but BBC reporter Nick Rankin goes one step further: he draws a direct parallel between Somali pirates who kidnapped and held ransom a fishing crew, and a publisher of a pirated version of his own book. While this is probably not the official stance of the BBC, you might want to drop them a note about this outrageous simile. Or just post pirate jokes in this discussion."
Link to Original Source
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London Street Signs Copyrighted

identity0 identity0 writes  |  more than 6 years ago

identity0 (77976) writes "The Westminster Council has gotten copyright over the street sign designs created for the city in the 1960s by designer Misha Black. All products using the signs' image must now apply for a license to do so. The BBC is already calling those using the designs 'Counterfeiters'. But should public signage be copyrightable?"
Link to Original Source
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identity0 identity0 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

identity0 (77976) writes "Following their laptop battery recalls, Apple and Dell laptops have been banned from battery-powered operation on all Korean Air flights. They may still be used with the in-cabin AC power plug, but their batteries must be removed before flight or they will not be allowed onboard. The official press release notes that the battery ban includes "Dell laptops (including those unaffected by recall), Apple's iBook and Powerbook models". Can the Dell Dude and Ellen Feiss figure out how to take the battery out, or will they be trapped in Korea?"

Journals

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Movie reviews

identity0 identity0 writes  |  more than 11 years ago So, I went to see a few movies yesterday with my mother, at a film festival in Memphis. Here are some quick reviews:

Kwik Stop: A really good story about love and life told in a way that feels a bit different from the usual sentimental love story. A girl meets a boy in a small town, and they decide to go to Hollywood together and persue their dreams - but they can't seem to get going. The film focuses mostly on the girl(Didi), but the guy and his former girlfriend are rather interesting characters, too. The journey to Hollywood seems to be a metaphor for life's journey, and the character's struggles in getting to Hollywood reflect people's difficulty in changing their lives. I found the film meaningful in that respect, as my own life seems to be stuck in a rut at this moment, much like the charachters in the film. While much of it is somewhat serious, there are some really funny parts to it, as well. I'd highly recommend this film to just about anyone.

I'll add the rest of the reviews later...

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