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Comments

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Security Company Tries To Hide Flaws By Threatening Infringement Suit

ihtoit not news (64 comments)

Governments are trying similar shit, by silencing dissent with summary penalties for as-yet undefined "trolling".

More at 11.

7 hours ago
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Ubuntu Turns 10

ihtoit Re:sharpie marks? Marketing needs a shakeup (103 comments)

I'd've gone the Ubuntu route had I not already spent many hours whittling a DVD distro (Knoppix) to a miniDVD size (1.8GB from 4.1GB) simply by pruning application trees. You can have half a gig back with the simple expedient of chopping most of the word processing and graphics packages - OpenOffice and The GIMP does most of what most people could ever want in desktop publishing, and they take less than 200MB between them. I did leave all of the reference drivers in though, Knoppix isn't Knoppix without the amazing job Klaus did with cramming those in.

10 hours ago
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No More Lee-Enfield: Canada's Rangers To Get a Tech Upgrade

ihtoit Re:That is a very different material (283 comments)

yep. $630 for a 25 kilo block of grade 2 ferrotitanium, by the time you're finished you've got a finished product that weighs just over a kilo and a large ceramic bucket full of scrap (which you can melt down and reform to sheet/billet/whatever and machine to something else, like a machine part or a tool tip, but that's by the by).

10 hours ago
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In UK, Internet Trolls Could Face Two Years In Jail

ihtoit Re:Much as I despise trolls (473 comments)

go to source: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/...

the BBC is the least trustworthy source for anything ever.

ask then answer: if England didn't have a constitution THEN HOW IN THE ACTUAL FUCK CAN WE BE A CONSTITUTIONAL MONARCHY?

yesterday
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Microsoft Gearing Up To Release a Smartwatch of Its Own

ihtoit Re:Funny but Microsoft is the most open ecosystem. (165 comments)

Skype no longer works on my ZTE F930. It worked great until about three weeks after the acquisition, then a software update broke it beyond belief. I can find no way to roll it back and disable updates.

yesterday
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The Largest Ship In the World Is Being Built In Korea

ihtoit Re:Question (253 comments)

Almost. The water level will remain the same since the rock will only sink to the level where the density of the water is equal to it, hence it attains neutral buoyancy.

(proof: pumice floats).

yesterday
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The Largest Ship In the World Is Being Built In Korea

ihtoit Re:World largest cock (253 comments)

what are you doing with a chicken in your trouser? Actually, don't answer that.

yesterday
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No More Lee-Enfield: Canada's Rangers To Get a Tech Upgrade

ihtoit Re:That is a very different material (283 comments)

yeah, having looked at it already as a possible solution (GRE), I eventually dismissed it in favour of a milled titanium alloy back when I had fuckloads of money to burn since GRE is far too brittle for use in a high impact setting like a rifle stock (test blocks revealed a goodly few disadvantages of epoxy matrices not least of which the brittle set states of cured blocks, plus the problem of cores of poured moulds not curing properly. Glass reinforced nylon is a superior solution but it being vulnerable to extreme cold still renders it unsuitable. I even tried epoxy putty and Isopon P38 car body filler, both of which proved unsuitable due to poor impact resistance).

yesterday
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In UK, Internet Trolls Could Face Two Years In Jail

ihtoit Re:see a dictionary (473 comments)

it's a matter of public record. Sort of.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/new...

Health minister Simon Burns must consider himself lucky not to have been disciplined - not so far anyway - for describing, under his breath in the Commons yesterday, Speaker John Bercow as ''a stupid, sanctimonious dwarf''.

Although the remark was picked up by the Press Gallery, Mr Bercow did not hear it, or affected not to hear it.

But when he heard about it, he said that no record had been made, implying that he had ordered the comment to be excluded from Hansard, the official report.
 

The Speaker of the House has the authority to order any word uttered in the Chamber (which has a live television feed to satellite and cable in operation whenever the Chamber is in session) to be stricken from the official record. Said, essentially in public, but retroactively censored hence offering some degree of deniability - if only there wasn't that pesky press gallery which is invariably full for the juicy debates!

So an incident which occupied the headlines in today's newspapers did not officially take place. The Speaker has wielded his censor's pen, and censored (or should the word be ''redacted'') the comment from the record.

Hansard is not a verbatim report and comments made by MPs ''from a sedentary position'' are generally not recorded, unless they give rise to exchanges in the chamber.

But tinkering with Hansard can be perilous. Some years ago, Speaker Horace King was involved in angry exchanges with a Tory MP named Donald Box. Later, privately, Box told the Speaker that he had got his facts wrong, so the Speaker agreed to excise the row from Hansard.

Incidentally, not too many months ago (July I think it was) a long list of names was read out in the Chamber, those names all being intimately connected with Sinn Fein and alluding to allegations that those names were connected with activities some might consider not quite legal. Like, for instance, plotting and executing the Brighton bombings. The entire record of the live televised debate was erased from Hansard but not before it had already been published.

Things get progressively darker from there. I have a scrape of Hansard from back when it first went online, I'll have to do a rescrape and run a diff, because I do recall a bit of a panic on when it was realised that there was information in there that the Government would rather we forgot - like for instance, the debates in 1958 concerning the permanent scrapping of the Blue Streak nuclear deterrent (and calling into question the entire point of the V project) in favour of the insanely expensive and as then untested Trident programme, the 1971 nonevents surrounding the UK's entry into the European Common Market with that secession clause that Teddy Boy Heath absolutely insisted and would brook no debate on it being in there which means that Scotland's split from the UK would have ended the UK's Europe membership because the UK would have technically ceased to exist, and the incredible opposition to Thatcher's plan to send our entire Naval force to the Falklands to liberate a few sheep from those pesky Argies in 1982.

yesterday
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In UK, Internet Trolls Could Face Two Years In Jail

ihtoit Re:libel, conspiracy is not censorship. Pdoor rest (473 comments)

there is plenty of case law concerning retroactive censorship, and oodles of unreported stuff as well. An example of this in print is the Yu Gi Oh (or however it's spelled) trading card games, where certain illustrations are omitted and often replaced with stock filler from the original Korean sets and the Western releases. Anecdotally, a flip to retroactive censorship cost my several hours of my life I'll never get back and several hours of stock footage I'll never be able to use after the dizzy bitch who managed to get herself into EVERY SHOT and even videobombed all the actual speakers, walked up to me after the event and said using not polite language that she did NOT want to see her face on the internet. Notwithstanding that it was OUTSIDE on a PUBLIC HIGHWAY at a PUBLIC GATHERING. I would have happily THROTTLED HER.

(the kicker for her is that she said what she said over a live video stream, and after I informed her such she scuttled away like a roach).

yesterday
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NASA Cancels "Sunjammer" Solar Sail Demonstration Mission

ihtoit Re:Sunjammer (73 comments)

nope. Clippers are wooden hulled. Windjammers are at least four times more massive and steel hulled.

yesterday
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Ask Slashdot: LTE Hotspot As Sole Cellular Connection?

ihtoit cell BB and wifi (101 comments)

been doing this for years with several laptops and desktops (sometimes all at once) on unlimited data plan, works great for skype etc.

yesterday
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The Woman Who Should Have Been the First Female Astronaut

ihtoit Re:um... ok (193 comments)

yeah, still bugs me how he got onto STS-95 even what, over three decades after sustaining that head injury? He did pass all the fitness requirements apart from that one melatonin test, but that wasn't enough to disqualify him either.

yesterday
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In UK, Internet Trolls Could Face Two Years In Jail

ihtoit Re:Right (473 comments)

addendum: as a result of the sheer number of summary prosecutions following the 2011 riots, a significant number of cases were NOT RECORDED having been disposed of in very short order (revolving door chambers and average four minutes per case).

yesterday
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In UK, Internet Trolls Could Face Two Years In Jail

ihtoit Re:Right (473 comments)

I think you mean the Communications Act 2003 section 127. The Malicious Communications Act was 1988 which was partly superceded by S.127.

Some cases prosecuted under S.127:

Paul Chambers (conviction overturned on appeal)
2011 riots (HUNDREDS of summary convictions following this incident. David Glyn Jones received a four month sentence for a single message on Facebook found to have incited a breach of the peace)
Azhar Ahmed (also a single Facebook post)
Frank Zimmerman (6 months suspended for two years for sending threatening emails to an MP)
Joshua Cryer (trolled soccer player Stan Collymore)
John Kerlen (jailed over tweets, overturned on appeal but handed a restraining order)
Daniel Thomas (arrested but not prosecuted under Section 127 over tweets)
Dale Cregan fanpage (IIRC the guy who put this up on Facebook was found guilty under S.127 and jailed for six months)
Matthew Woods (3 months in a YOI for explicit Fcebook posts regarding April Jones and Madeline McCann)
Sam Busby (two months curfew for Facebook posts about April Jones)
Caroline Criado-Perez (R v Sorley & Nimmo, concerning Twitter abuse)
Stella Creasy (R v Nunn, Twitter abuse)
Jordan Barrack (drew a picture of a cock on a picture of a police officer, posted it to Facebook earning him a £400 compensation order and further ordered to serve out 12 months community service)

Between 2003-07-25 and 2011-12-31 there had been 5316 people found guilty at magistrates courts in England and Wales of offences under section 127. These figures will include obscene telephone calls and text messages as well as internet-based communications. (source: Hansard)

yesterday
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The Woman Who Should Have Been the First Female Astronaut

ihtoit um... ok (193 comments)

let's send an 83 year old woman into space to satisfy some fucking clickbaiter's need for a political score.

Fuck me, she'd be dead before she clears the tower.

yesterday
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In UK, Internet Trolls Could Face Two Years In Jail

ihtoit Re:Definition of a troll? (473 comments)

in which court?

Judges in England are paid by local Government and operate in buildings leased through private companies under contract to LOCAL GOVERNMENT.

Ask then answer: who owns the courts in England?

yesterday

Submissions

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Leon's Law: Police Cam Pilot Commences In London

ihtoit ihtoit writes  |  about 9 months ago

ihtoit (3393327) writes "Following the death of Leon Briggs in police custody last November, public calls for police to wear recording body cameras have at last borne some fruit: a pilot scheme on East London has beat officers wearing switchable video cameras for them to record interactions with members of the public. However, some are not as thrilled about the idea of being surveiled while going about their public duty as those members of the public asked and responded who said that public accountability is the only way to restore public trust in the police. Supporters of "Leon's Law" have already expressed concern that these cameras have switches that allow the officers wearing them to turn them on and off at will when the technology exists on a commercial basis to equip officers with continuous-recording HD cameras.

More on this, continually updated with media links."

Link to Original Source
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Stars In His Eyes: New England Electrician Takes 14kV, Shrugs It Off

ihtoit ihtoit writes  |  about 9 months ago

ihtoit (3393327) writes "An electrician was let with stars in his eyes after an electric shock left him with some unusually shaped cataracts.
The 42-year-old man from New England went to doctors a month after he received a 14,000 V shock to his left shoulder, when his eye sight deteriorated.
He has since had the cataracts removed and although it is believed the cause was damage to his optic nerve doctors are not sure why they were star-shaped.
Sources: New England journal of Medicine, ITV"

Link to Original Source
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John Doe Lawsuits Baseless, So Says DC Federal Judge

ihtoit ihtoit writes  |  about 9 months ago

ihtoit (3393327) writes "Four people accused of sharing illegal copies of the movie "Elf-Man" persuaded a federal judge there is not enough evidence to support copyright infringement claims against them.
          Elf-Man LLC, producer of the direct-to-DVD release "Elf-Man" sued Eric Cariveau et al. in Federal Court a year ago, accusing them of sharing a peer-to-peer file of the movie.
          Elf-Man claims the defendants illegally copied and distributed the movie online.
          "Despite the industry's efforts to capitalize on internet technology and reduce costs to end viewers through legitimate and legal means of online viewing such as through Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon Prime, there are still those that use this technology to steal motion pictures and undermine the efforts of creators through their illegal copying and distribution of motion pictures," Elf-Man's attorney Maureen VanderMay wrote in the complaint.
          U.S. District Judge Robert Lasnik granted Elf-Man's motion to initiate discovery on the IP addresses of defendants, but noted that "the risk of false positives is very real."
          "It is not clear that plaintiff could ... make factual contentions regarding an Internet subscriber's infringing activities based solely on the fact that he or she pays the Internet bill," Lasnik wrote in the order.
          Elf-Man named 18 individual defendants in its first amended complaint. A default judgment was ordered against two of them; claims against the Doe defendants were dismissed. Claims against four other named defendants were also dismissed on the grounds of their implausibility."

Link to Original Source
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New views of famed supernova reveal giant dust factory

ihtoit ihtoit writes  |  about 9 months ago

ihtoit (3393327) writes "Astronomers using the ALMA radio telescope in Chile have released images and data showing the oft-postulated but unobserved (until now) dust shell ejected by the supernova remnant SN1987A. "We have found a remarkably large dust mass concentrated in the central part of the ejecta from a relatively young and nearby supernova," astronomer Remy Indebetouw, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and the University of Virginia, said in a statement. “This is the first time we've been able to really image where the dust has formed, which is important in understanding the evolution of galaxies." SN1987A was the first catalogued supernova event in our Galactic neighbourhood in 1987. It lies 168,000 light years (987 quadrillion miles) away in the Large Magellanic Cloud, which means that at the time of the explosion, woolly mammoths still roamed Europe and Mitochondrial Eve saw her first sunrise."
Link to Original Source
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Cancel the eulogy: ISON survives brush with Sun

ihtoit ihtoit writes  |  about a year ago

ihtoit (3393327) writes "Comet ISON flew through the sun's atmosphere on Nov. 28th and the encounter did not go well for the icy comet. Just before perihelion (closest approach to the sun) the comet rapidly faded and appeared to disintegrate. This prompted reports of ISON's demise. However, a fraction of the comet has survived. Spaceweather.com has an animation captured from satellites showing the emergence of what remains of our visitor."
Link to Original Source

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