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Comments

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Barometers In iPhones Mean More Crowdsourcing In Weather Forecasts

iluvcapra Re:haha (78 comments)

Her brother is the Kwisatz Haderach...

yesterday
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Barometers In iPhones Mean More Crowdsourcing In Weather Forecasts

iluvcapra Re:haha (78 comments)

"Innovation" mostly has to do with getting people to buy or use something -- actually being the first person to invent or market the thing doesn't really carry any intrinsic benefit, follow-through and execution always trump good ideas. Ideas are cheap.

--- Signed, Ignaz Semmelweiss, Elija Gray, the Lumiere Brothers, Preston Tucker, Douglas Engelbart, Xerox PARC, inter alia

yesterday
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Texas Health Worker Tests Positive For Ebola

iluvcapra Re:Everybody Panic! (419 comments)

It doesn't to you? "Well, they have to take off those contaminated suits, and some will get infected while
doing that. Shit happens." really isn't the right approach here.

Do you even know how this case of infection occurred? I made no claims along these lines, you're the one who says he knows, or rather knows enough to know there was a systemic problem and not one merely attributable to failure to follow established protocols.

Huh? Plane flights? Are we still talking about a controlled clinical environment in a big American city?

There are only about a dozen BSL-4 facilities in the US; if you want to establish the principle that patients must be treated in such a facility, you will be moving A LOT of them. Also, none of these facilities are equipped to handle patients. The first requirement of a BSL-4 lab is that it's a separate building purpose-built for containment.

You're losing me here.

I sure am, because you seem to think every metro in the US has a world-class biohazard facility and infrastructure, and has plenty to spare on a wild goose chase of isolating minimally-virulent ebola patients, and you can't seem to understand that your fears are based completely on your own speculation and snap judgement. Your conceptualization of this disease, and the means required to contain it, constitute the textbook definition of cargo cult science.

about two weeks ago
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Texas Health Worker Tests Positive For Ebola

iluvcapra Re:Everybody Panic! (419 comments)

So basically you're just anxious, because none of this "seems right" in complete absence of empirical evidence? And in your sample of 10 (or 20, who knows!) one person became ill, because, we dunno, but it sounds fishy.

What recommendations would you make, if you were, say, a public health official? Everyone who develops illness has to be treated in something akin to a BSL-4 facility? Have you any idea how many plane flights that would require, just to cite one small aspect of the logistics? And all this to protect from a disease vector that's completely unsubstantiated in the literature?

Or do you do like Judge Clay Jenkins, and personally go to the family's house in shirt-sleeves and drive them to a new home? Which approach is more appropriate? Which one balances our available resources against the actual concrete threat of the disease? Which one is actually workable?

about two weeks ago
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Texas Health Worker Tests Positive For Ebola

iluvcapra Re:For those who said "No need to panic" (419 comments)

The evidence is continued exponential growth of Ebola to recent past.

This is why Africa was finally made barren of human inhabitants in 1980...

Also this is what, two cases in the US, three? Maybe 5 total outside of Africa, and almost all of them among health workers collateral to treating confirmed Ebola-suffering patients?

about two weeks ago
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Texas Health Worker Tests Positive For Ebola

iluvcapra Re:Everybody Panic! (419 comments)

What kind of amateurs are running this place?

I had brunch with my friend this morning, who is an MD PhD in infectious disease and works in a BSL-4 laboratory from time to time, so I asked about this.

BSL-4 is a standard that only applies to laboratories, the same standards aren't necessarily applied to clinical environments, and in the case of Ebola are major overkill. Ebola can't travel through the air, so positive pressure suits aren't appropriate, and they still have to be taken on and off, and that's when health workers seem to get infected. People who "test positive" for Ebola are not contagious, only people who have symptoms are, and they can only pass the disease through contact with bodily fluids -- this usually implies touch, since hemorrhagic fevers cause people to give off all kinds of gross effluent, but it's just not like a "virus" one gets from casual contact, like, say, rubella.

The fact is, Ebola isn't that contagious -- HIV is more virulent, and these two are nothing compared to the influenza or SARS. It's bad that health workers can get it, but this is still one person, so on a completely epidemiological basis it's really not a big deal. Characterizing a single case as somehow indicative of the safety of these procedures is sensationalism.

about two weeks ago
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Microsoft Develops Analog Keyboard For Wearables, Solves Small Display Dilemma

iluvcapra Re:like the iwatch (100 comments)

It looks like you don't have to learn a gesture alphabet like Graffiti. I also recall that, even if you were quite fast and accurate, graffiti's WPM just couldn't compete with keyboard, even a touch one. And even then it still has to compete with the various speech-to-text solutions.

And then the iWatch thing is altogether a different thing -- Siri and "Ok Google" are meant for speedy text entry, at the expense of discretion; this finger writing thing seems to be meant to be still text-based but more discreet, but this makes it much slower; and the iWatch drawing seems to emphasize speed and minimize distraction at the expense of precision -- it can't send text, but you can send messages without anyone casually noticing you have a smart watch.

about two weeks ago
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Details of iOS and Android Device Encryption

iluvcapra Re:If you can't crack the password, then don't. (146 comments)

The user is happily using their iWhatever. The government sends a Nation Security letter to Apple forcing them to put a backdoor into the phone of the target, such that this app can read whatever data it wants on the phone.

It's impossible to cut a hardware vendor out of the trust system, unless you audit the hardware of your device. But set this aside.

This won't work because apps never see your password or have access to the decryption keys. The CPU itself doesn't have access to the decryption keys and doesn't even do the crypto algorithms. When the CPU needs to access some data that's encrypted in memory or on the Flash drive, it tells the secure enclave and writes the data to its input. The enclave then decrypts the data, with keys it keeps in its own non-volatile storage, and writes the decrypted data back to the CPU. In the case of the fulll-disk encryption or the fingerprint encryption, at no time do any keys pass into the CPU, let alone get written to RAM. The CPU can order the enclave to create new keys or keypairs, it can enumerate and name them, and associate them with metadata outside the enclave, but it can't actually read the keys themselves.

about two weeks ago
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AIDS Origin Traced To 1920s Kinshasa

iluvcapra Re:climate change (162 comments)

The truth is if you don't let a dirty needle or an AIDS-infected male penetrate you, you're pretty safe from AIDS

Ah, a male can get AIDS from a woman, particularly if one or the other of you has another STD. More to the point, the whole issue with "AIDS-infected" people is that you generally can't tell them from normal people for years after they become contagious, this doesn't have much use for married people who's partner strays -- or even for most Americans who's courtships average from 6 to 18 months (get tested everybody).

It's important to understand that AIDS isn't virulent because it passes through "dirty" or "immoral" practices -- it's the sociological phenomenon of uncleanness an immorality that cause the spread of HIV. People don't talk about gay sex, in the US people hardly talk about sex at all -- it's freighted with taboos and superstitions. Our own prudishness makes it difficult for knowledgable people to talk about the disease and how its spread, it's virulence among "undesirables" cause all kinds of rumors and misconceptions that make the pandemic worse. People in the US have been contracting HIV since the 70s, straight people, gay people, everyone, but the misguided belief that it was a "gay" disease led people to believe that it wasn't a contagion, that it wasn't a public health problem of any kind -- think of how many people were killed by the lie that HIV is spread by sexual immorality.

And how many people continue to get HIV because they're convinced, as you say, that people with HIV will "probably have warning signs that they'll be a bad partner," that HIV comes from "bad" people and "bad" behavior, that it is necessarily shameful? Really honest people can make great partners and be infectious for years before having symptoms. All of these people fucking, all the time... AIDS is a disease that is spread by people being unwilling or too uncomfortable to talk about sex, what it is, how people do it, and who should or shouldn't be doing it, and this in turn is caused by boneheaded and dangerous cultural norms that serve no purpose.

about two weeks ago
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AIDS Origin Traced To 1920s Kinshasa

iluvcapra Re:12 Monkeys (162 comments)

"I'm in insurance."

about two weeks ago
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AIDS Origin Traced To 1920s Kinshasa

iluvcapra Re: Are we sure it is blood/meat contact? (162 comments)

Because there is not a single case of AIDS prior to 1959. Humans have been eating bushmeat for millions of years. Why did the disease cross over in 1959(AIDS-1) and 1960's(AIDS-2)?

Ah, yes, 1959, the well known red-letter day when the first human stuck his genitals in a chimpanzee. Citation?

The theory is that the intensive economic development of Africa, beginning at the start of the 20th century, created the only environment in which the nonvirulent SIV could make several animal-to-human transmissions, sustain itself and mutate in the human population, and then be communicated far enough to produce and epidemic. SIV didn't become HIV in the first jump, people had been getting exposed to SIV since antiquity; what was needed was for multiple people to get SIV, even non-virulent, poorly-transmissible SIV, and to very quickly pass it to a core group of dozens or hundreds of individuals, in which the virus would have a large enough group in which to mutate.

Prostitution and bushmeat existed in Africa prior to 1900, but cities did not, and dense cities, motorized transportation, and large populations of transient workers passing from city to countryside and back seems to be the critical factor.

[As to the implication of the question, I can only say that, like most "bad" things, conservatives tend to assume that there were no gay people prior to the 1960s. The conservative narrative about all social ills goes: "This thing didn't exist when I was a child, some weirdoes invented it around the time I came of age, and now we must defeat it in order to restore our culture to where it was when I was a child."

If some controversial social issue became patent in 1983, like say the "GRID"/AIDS crisis, basically every social conservative who was older than 18 in 1983 will believe to their dying day that gay people didn't exist prior to when they were children (1970). Now that homosexuality and AIDS is a completely "out" issue, social conservatives who have turned 18 in the last 5-10 years couldn't care less about gays. Nowadays all these younger conservatives talk about is the leviathan state and taxes, and predictably, they tell the story that government has become radical, authoritarian and profligate in some way that's categorically different from the previous 100 years, and we must fight to bring the state back to some Schlaraffian fairy-land that existed in the 90s (and conveniently prior to 9/11).]

about two weeks ago
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AIDS Origin Traced To 1920s Kinshasa

iluvcapra Re:Are we sure it is blood/meat contact? (162 comments)

Because, at the same time, we've been told HIV can't spread orally.

Whenever someone says something really flat and sorta elliptical like "orally," we gotta get clear about this too -- HIV cannot be spread by kissing. It can be spread by oral sex however, and can be spread by mouth-to-mouth contact when other factors are in play.

HIV exposure from dental work is actually a really common risk factor. In fact, the very first known case of iatrogenic HIV infection was from a dental office.

It's generally accepted you can't get it from kissing, but kissing, eating food, eating raw food, eating bodily fluids, oral contact in the presence of bodily fluids, and oral contact associated with cuts or open sores -- for example, florid herpes -- are all really different vectors.

about two weeks ago
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Adobe Photoshop Is Coming To Linux, Through Chromebooks

iluvcapra Re:How important is that at this point? (197 comments)

complaints from users about the name (VERY unprofessional and immature, BTW)

They aren't the ones that named it "GIMP," which is a really well-known American idiom that could have been easily avoided if the developers weren't too busy smelling their own farts.

These all scream "ME DONT WANT TO RELEARN ANYTHING"

It's this presumption that everyone who doesn't use GIMP is stupid and lazy, or that making it more attractive would necessarily lead it to becoming a "Photoshop clone" exemplifies the FOSS general ignorance of creative use cases and users, and tends to explain FOSS's utter failure at even making a dent in these markets. As long as your attitude is "I'm doing this for free, so I don't have to meet you half way, art fag," people will happily pay $10 a month for CC.

[Signed, someone who drops $1k a year keeping his Pro Tools up to date and would rather not.]

about three weeks ago
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Adobe Photoshop Is Coming To Linux, Through Chromebooks

iluvcapra Re:How important is that at this point? (197 comments)

3D modelers know what a vertex is, what I think he means is that, in some cases, perhaps they don't completely understand the mathematical formalism of the thing, and just have an intuitive feeling for what it is -- "the thing that's the corner of my thing."

Of course, there is the perspective that you shouldn't need to understand the "fundamentals" or nuts and bolts reifications of things, because that's what the software's for, to take all of these mathematical games and put them in a box, out of the way in a separated concern, so I can get the job done in whatever way I want. What's the point of having software if it doesn't enable people, even mathematically disinclined people, to create?

A sculptor has as much to say about 3D modeling as some voxel-counting dork from NVidia's demo team, more even, really. Saying that "vertices" or "bezier paths" form some sort of "fundamental" base for all visual art is constructivist, scientistic and naive.

about three weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Swift Or Objective-C As New iOS Developer's 1st Language?

iluvcapra Re:Obj-C (316 comments)

No no, your boss is going to have a word with you about that:

class Greeter {
    public void greet();
}
 
public class HelloWorld extends Greeter {
    @Override
    public void greet() {
        System.out.println("Hello, World");
    }
}
 
public class GreeterFactory {
    public static Greeter getGreeter(String type) {
    if (type == "HelloWorld") {
        return new HelloWorld();
    } else {
        return nil;
    }
}
 
public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        GreeterFactory theFactory = GreeterFactory();
        Greeter helloWorld = theFactory.getGreeter("HelloWorld");
        helloWorld.greet();
    }
}

Java has a reputation as the New Cobol partly because that's how Sun marketed it, but also because it kinda has the soul of a compliance officer.

about three weeks ago
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FBI Chief: Apple, Google Phone Encryption Perilous

iluvcapra Re:Not Even True (354 comments)

Encryption places nobody above the law all it does do is ensure that you are aware of any legal attempt to access your encrypted data because they will need to get a court order to compel you to disclose the decryption key.

The government is under no constitutional or legal obligation to inform you of a warrant on you, no such protection has ever existed in fact or de jure. They can tap your phone without you knowing, they can read your mail, they can install cameras at your home and work; indeed there's this thing called a sealed warrant, which was invented long before information technology and the whole object of which is to keep the subject from knowing about the evidence collection.

Even better, if the prosecutor has a good reason, he can even have a grand jury indict you and keep the indictment under seal until you're arraigned. If a judge thinks there's a real chance you'd destroy evidence, or flee, or your knowledge of police activity would have sufficiently negative consequences, he's completely within his prerogative to keep his orders secret.

about three weeks ago
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FBI Chief: Apple, Google Phone Encryption Perilous

iluvcapra Re:Beyond the law? (354 comments)

The term "involuntary servitude" has been repeatedly interpreted by courts to pertain specifically to chattel slavery and very little else -- impressment of sailors, contract indenture and certain forms of truck farming being notable secondary examples.

People have tried to use the 14th to excuse themselves from jury duty, income taxes, selective service, alimony payments, all manner of silly things, and have failed. Do you really think evasion of subpoena would be a winner?

about three weeks ago
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FBI Chief: Apple, Google Phone Encryption Perilous

iluvcapra Re:Beyond the law? (354 comments)

See Shannon's Maxim.

about three weeks ago

Submissions

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Most Citizens of the Star Wars Galaxy are Functionally Illiterate

iluvcapra iluvcapra writes  |  about 2 years ago

iluvcapra (782887) writes "Ryan Britt at Tor.com makes a bit of analysis that I think we'd have some fun with, in agreement or otherwise:

Not once in any Star Wars movie does someone pick up a book or newspaper, magazine, literary journal, or chapbook handmade by an aspiring Jawa poet. [...]As early as the 1990s-era expanded Star Wars books and comic books, we’re introduced to ancient Jedi “texts” called holocrons, which are basically talking holographic video recordings. Just how long has the Star Wars universe been reliant on fancy technology to transfer information as opposed to the written word? Is it possible that a good number of people in Star Wars are completely illiterate?

Read the whole thing,"
Link to Original Source

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Google Allows Carriers to Ban Tethering Apps

iluvcapra iluvcapra writes  |  more than 3 years ago

iluvcapra (782887) writes "Google, in its continuing struggle to provide phone carriers (if not its end users) with an open platform, is now banning tethering apps from the Android market. These apps haven't disappeared and can still be sideloaded, insofar as your carrier doesn't lock this functionality or snoop on your packets."
Link to Original Source
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Google, Handset Vendors at Odds over Openness

iluvcapra iluvcapra writes  |  more than 3 years ago

iluvcapra (782887) writes "It would appear that now that Android has achieved a commanding share of the smartphone market, openness for the sake of openness is no longer a driving priority. Ashley Vance and Peter Burroughs report for Bloomberg on the latest phase of Google's consolidation of the Android platform:

Over the last couple of months Google has reached out to the major carriers and device makers backing its mobile operating system with a message: There will be no more willy-nilly tweaks to the software. No more partnerships formed outside of Google's purview. From now on, companies hoping to receive early access to Google's most up-to-date software will need approval of their plans. And they will seek that approval from Andy Rubin, the head of Google's Android group.

"

Link to Original Source
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Google Delaying Release of Honeycomb Source

iluvcapra iluvcapra writes  |  more than 3 years ago

iluvcapra (782887) writes "BusinessWeek reports that Google will not be releasing the source code for Android Honeycomb "for the forseeable future." Android lead Andy Rubin is quoted, stating that if Google were to release the source for Honeycomb, Google would be unable to prevent it from being installed on mobile phones and "and creating a really bad user experience.""
Link to Original Source
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Apple/Verizon in Talks for iPhone-Like Devices

iluvcapra iluvcapra writes  |  more than 5 years ago

iluvcapra (782887) writes "For those of you waiting vainly to get an iPhone that works with Verizon's service in the US (you know who you are, we won't make you admit it here), there comes this interesting story in BusinessWeek

Verizon Wireless is warming to the idea of an Apple (AAPL) partnership. Verizon Wireless is in talks with Apple to distribute two new iPhone-like devices, BusinessWeek has learned. Apple has created prototypes of the devices, and discussions reaching back a half-year have involved Apple CEO Steve Jobs, according to two people familiar with the matter.

One device is a smaller, less expensive calling device described by a person who has seen it as an "iPhone lite." The other is a media pad that would let users listen to music, view photos, and watch high-definition videos, the person says. It would place calls over a Wi-Fi connection.

"

Link to Original Source
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Audit the Stimulus at Home with RSS

iluvcapra iluvcapra writes  |  more than 5 years ago

iluvcapra (782887) writes "In a remarkable provision of Peter Orzag's instructions for implementing the American Recovery and Re-Investment Act, the Office of Management and Budget has instructed all government units responsible for disbursing stimulus money to provide its weekly reports, communications and block grant information on an RSS feed. From the memo(PDF):

For each of the near term reporting requirements (major communications, formula block grant allocations, weekly reports) agencies are required to provide a feed (preferred: Atom 1.0, acceptable: RSS) of the information so that content can be delivered via subscription. Note that the required information can be supplied in the feed or the feed can point to a file at the agency using the convention noted below. If an agency is immediately unable to publish feeds, the agency should post each near term information flow (major communications, formula block grant allocations, weekly reports) to a URL directory convention suggested below: ...

"

Link to Original Source
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Apple Open-Sources Leopard Garbage Collector

iluvcapra iluvcapra writes  |  more than 5 years ago

iluvcapra (782887) writes "Apple has open-sourced AutoZone, the garbage collector used in Mac OS X Leopard's Objective-C runtime, under the Apache v2 License. Despite its current use case in Objective-C, the engine itself is implemented in C and C++ and is described as "a fairly generic scanning, conservative, generational, multi-threaded, language agnostic, collector.""
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iPhone SDK Announced, Exchange, OpenGL Supported

iluvcapra iluvcapra writes  |  more than 6 years ago

iluvcapra writes "Apple has just wrapped up their iPhone development roadmap and here are the features to be presented with version 2.0, due in June: Push email and contacts, ActiveSync supporting Exchange, remote wipe. Several video games were demoed using the iPhone accelerometer and OpenGL on the iPhone, such as Spore and Super Monkeyball. SDK with development in Xcode was announced, performance suite and remote debugging of iPhone apps over the sync cable. Apple will sell apps through an iTunes-style store, that will work OTA from the iPhone or with the host computer. They will exercise control over which apps are vended over the system, and will split the sales on the system 70/30 with the developer (dev gets 70%)."
Link to Original Source
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NORAD's Santa Tracking Goes Web 2.0

iluvcapra iluvcapra writes  |  more than 6 years ago

iluvcapra (782887) writes "NORAD Tracks Santa 2007, NORAD's perennial mission of tracking the progress of Santa's sleigh as he makes his yearly sortie, has gone Web 2.0 this year, including a Google Maps mashup showing Santa's current position on Earth (at time of submission, Keetmanshoop, Namibia), a KML link to let you track Santa on Google Earth, and plots and keyhole imagery on youtube.

My only question: When Santa crosses into the ADIZ, what does he set his squawk to?"

Link to Original Source
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US Democrats Accidently Publish Whistleblowers

iluvcapra iluvcapra writes  |  more than 6 years ago

iluvcapra writes "The US House Judiciary Committee recently emailed all of its potential whistleblowers information about how it was restructuring its whistleblower program. Unfortunately for its sources, it emailed them this information with their addresses in the "To:" field (and not the Bcc: field). It also cc:'d this email to the Vice President.

I'd like to think think this is some sort of ingenious subterfuge, but I'm doubtful."

Link to Original Source
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9th Circuit Very Skeptical of NSA Surveillance

iluvcapra iluvcapra writes  |  more than 7 years ago

iluvcapra (782887) writes "Yesterday before a three-judge panel of the 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals, the US government argued that two class action lawsuits against the government and AT&T should be dismissed, because to litigate them in open court would cause the revelation of state secrets. The lawsuits allege that the government has installed a vast system of electronic surveillance gear at internet gateways along the US west coast to monitor all internet traffic, and that this information is monitored without a warrant, even when both endpoints are domestic. The panel was extremely skeptical of the governments argument:

"Is it the government's position that when the country is engaged in a war, that the power of the executive when it comes to wiretapping is unchecked?" asked 83-year-old Judge Harry Pregerson, one of the court's staunchest liberals, of a Bush administration lawyer. "The king can do no wrong, is that what it comes down to?"


The government was unwilling to even provide a sworn affadavit that the eavesdropping was only of foreign correspondence. If the 9th Circuit allows the lawsuits to proceed, the government will appeal to the US Supreme Court."

Link to Original Source
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Google Cookies to Expire After 2 Years, was 30

iluvcapra iluvcapra writes  |  more than 7 years ago

iluvcapra writes "Google has announced that the cookies set on clients visiting its websites will be set to expire after 2 years, instead of the previous value of 30 years. It seems like a big difference, but does it really matter if you go to google 5 times a day?"
Link to Original Source
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iluvcapra iluvcapra writes  |  more than 7 years ago

iluvcapra writes "I recently came into the possession of about a hundred paper handwritten pages with tabular data, which I'd like to get into some kind of computer format (tab-delimited or XML would be fantastic, but any open database format would be good too. OCR wouldn't work, the handwriting is a little too fiddly, and I don't think I could hack a program that would properly interpret.

I'd rather not type the data in myself, I'd be happy to pay someone to do it. Is anyone aware of services on the web or in general that would take my stuff as a PDF and send me back a text file? I know there are services out there, but they seem to be oriented toward bulk and repeat business, and I'm really just looking for a one-time deal, and particularly I was looking for a reference and a story about how it all worked out."
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iluvcapra iluvcapra writes  |  more than 7 years ago

iluvcapra writes "Cocotron today released their MIT-licensed re-implementation of the Mac OS X Foundation and AppKit frameworks, which together form the dynamic libraries and resources that form the Cocoa environment on Mac OS X. In simple terms, this means a developer can write a program in Objective-C on Mac OS X with Xcode, and as long as he uses Cocoa widgets and objects, he can cross-compile a Windows version of his application; a bit like WINE in reverse. Here is a screenshot of TextEdit running on OS X beside TextEdit running on Windows."
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iluvcapra iluvcapra writes  |  more than 7 years ago

iluvcapra writes "This news is a little late, but on November 20th WarGames 2: The Dead Code began filming in Montreal, produced and distributed by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (distributor of the original WarGames) and directed by Stewart Gillard (apparently the director of such gems as Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 3.) Lawrence Lasker and Walter F. Parkes, the team behind the original film, are not involved, and the plot revolves around a hacker breaking into a terrorism-simulation computer.

I only became aware of the new production when I read MGM was suing the rightful owner of WarGames.com for his domain name."
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iluvcapra iluvcapra writes  |  more than 7 years ago

iluvcapra writes "Computerworld reports that in a 2004 company email read in the Microsoft-Iowa anti-trust trial, Jim Allchin, at the time head of Microsoft's Windows unit, would have bought a Mac if he wasn't currently working for Microsoft. "In my view, we lost our way," he writes about Microsoft. He continued:
"I think our teams lost sight of what bug-free means, what resilience means, what full scenarios mean, what security means, what performance means, how important current applications are, and really understanding what the most important problems our customers face are. I see lots of random features and some great vision, but that does not translate into great products."


It was also revealed by prosecutors that Bill Gates has an assistant who's primary responsibility is to "make sure no permanent record of Gates' e-mail existed.""

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