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Comments

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Twinkies: The Breakfast of Champion Programmers Still Hard To Get

infodragon Re:Pathetic (223 comments)

They have been used as a unit of measure for psychokinetic energy.

"Well, let's say this Twinkie represents the normal amount of psychokinetic energy in the New York area. Based on this morning's sample, it would be a Twinkie... thirty-five feet long, weighing approximately six hundred pounds."

about a year ago
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Ask Slashdot: What To Do When Another Dev Steals Your Work and Adds Their Name?

infodragon Re:Wayback machine? (480 comments)

Its not so grey as one would think.

Unless he was an employee (i.e. work for hire), which I doubt as he states contract; and unless the contract has some extremely strong language as to who owns the copyright then the originating developer has the copyright, the client has a license (This is the default of copyright law.) I have been in the situation of developing code as a contractor, there was lots of legal paperwork involved up front, but nothing stipulated the transfer of copyright to the corporation. This was a fortune 500 company and the code was for the only profitable division of the company for three years. When I wanted the code for another project that had nothing to do with them I stated this clearly when my contract ended. All their best attorneys got involved and I just maintained my right to the code, I did not get any attorneys involved. The end was a very nicely worded contract stating they, the client, would receive unlimited license to the code and a gentleman's agreement I would not compete with them. Fortunately it was a good relationship and I did not need an attorney. In the end their attorneys conceded that there was no way for them to obtain a true copyright unless the original contract started this was the intent, or that I signed it over at the end (which I was unwilling.)

To sum it up, employees are screwed; contractors have the option not to be screwed.

Hope this helps...

about a year ago
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Do Recreational Drugs Help Programmers?

infodragon Re:You're asking the wrong question. (878 comments)

I picked up a large base of C code of a guy who would only code when he was drunk. It was the biggest mess I ever saw, except a small part that was commented, "I did this sober because it had to be fixed yesterday..."

In his case mind altering substances helped, but he had no business coding to begin with.

I had the misfortune of meeting one of his team mates who was consulting for the firm to "bring us up to speed." 60's throwback begins to describe him, which explained the other mass of rambling code I had to deal with. You could tell, by the names of functions and variables, when he had the munchies/giggles and it got dark when he was paranoid. Humorous to go through, terrible to maintain. Oh yea, did I mention this software was operating networks of ATMs, as in peoples money?!?

about 2 years ago
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Discovery of Early Human Tools Hint at Earlier Start

infodragon Re:Time perspective (109 comments)

Yea, it's called Naquadah. Our ancient ancestors strip mined Sol of all of it! Now we are stuck with oil, and attempting to go green :(

about 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: How Do SSDs Die?

infodragon Re:Umm (510 comments)

They were on a pretty good UPS system connected to a GFI breaker. The room was climate controlled so unless something very weird happened I don't think electrical or environmental were an issue.

about 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: How Do SSDs Die?

infodragon Re:Umm (510 comments)

I couldn't agree more... But what's best often meets real world. It was a skunkworks project with no budget. It was amazing we got things working the way we did and the results got the attention it needed and then the resources were allocated.

The server was the old 737(?) pin first gen amd64 bit system. 64 bit Gentoo linux with software raid running the 5 SATA 80GB Seagate HDs. 2Gb of ram for a DB of 150GB of which 80% of the data was accessed on a daily basis... It was CRAZY project put together with the lowest of budget that achieved results good enough to actually get resources allocated rather than "it's good! keep it up!"

Gotta love the reactions on /.

about 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: How Do SSDs Die?

infodragon Re:Umm (510 comments)

That and the fab process is so precise that a fault is replicated so precisely that after 90 days of 24/7 operation they all failed within 24 hours, 4 failing in 8 hours. So it was engineered bad luck!

Anyway I glad those days of system admin are behind me, I'm with my passion now which is HPC C++ development. Those experiences stuck with me and give me much more respect for the admin of the HW I now use. It's funny and sad to watch their expressions when I talk to them intelligently and with respect. It's like they've never had that happen before.

about 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: How Do SSDs Die?

infodragon Re:Umm (510 comments)

[Sarcasm]Nothing like 20/20 hindsight... If I had done anything like trying to rebuild the array it would have fallen apart... Oh wait... If I had followed what you suggested I would have been SCREWED.[/Sarcasm]

I made a decision based on what on the information on hand.. The rebuild would have take more than a few hours, 80GB disk was SLOW, i.e. first gen SATA. By executing the DB dump I was hitting less than 1/2 the disk capacity on read than 100% disk capacity on a write. It would be significantly faster to retrieve the data than to rebuild. That time window was critical, 2 hours of read vs 4+ hours of write. I also knew I had all the data on hand and all the scripts tested monthly for rebuilding the entire DB on a different server. The decision was easy! Grab the DB data now, redeploy on another system and address the issue on the spot. The system ended up being down 3 hours rather than 24+.

Secondly The failure was abrupt with no SMART messages, I couldn't trust the others to not have the same non-reporting issues. I made a choice on the spot on how to proceed knowing full well I may have signed my own 24h torture warrant. Fortunately I didn't have the worst case happen and I learned a critical lesson.

A bit more information...

+- 30 minutes on each one
First disk failed...
2 hours later second disk failed...
2 hours later third disk failed.
2 hours later 4th disk failed
16 hours later 5th disk failed.

about 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: How Do SSDs Die?

infodragon Re:Umm (510 comments)

Never paranoid enough when dealing with data! I had a RAID 5 (5 disks) of Seagate 80GB SATA disks; 4 failed within an 8 hour window, the 5th failed within 24 hours of the first; this was 3 months after purchase. It was a HUGE PITA. First drive failed and I started an immediate DB dump to an NFS mount. 20GB and 2 hours later the second disk failed and RAID was dead. I ran the other three disks just to see what would happen...

I will NEVER, EVER run two storage medium (Spinning platter, SSD, ...) from the same lot in the same RAID ever again. I was saved by 20 minutes, in the above situation, from 24 hours of hell.

about 2 years ago
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Rapid Arctic Melt Called 'Planetary Emergency'

infodragon Re:Press coverage (757 comments)

They aren't that stupid, they just choose to be! There was a /. article a few months back that showed that giving evidence that contradicted someone's beliefs had the effect of reinforcing their beliefs. That on top of that you have many that just don't care, don't understand, or just want to be distracted. They exist on both sides.

Based on what is readily available, linking the ice melt in the north to global warming is incorrect. This does not mean there is no global warming, I personally believe the earth is still warming from the mini-ice age that just ended http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Ice_Age.

Below are reports on what is going on. Both state facts that can be shown to draw separate conclusions. The really interesting thing is we are past the 2nd standard deviation for antarctic ice growth, which is exceeding the amount of ice lost so we are in a net positive. Just try to explain this to the average Joe and watch them lose interest really fast! Use a car analogy and you still don't get anywhere. Once evidence is shown that seems to conflict most humans ignore it because understanding the complexity exceeds the effort to survive the next week.

Earth Loses Its 'Air Conditioner': Arctic Ice Cap Shrinks to Record Low Level
http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/science/july-dec12/icemelt_09-20.html
http://nsidc.org/news/press/2012_seaiceminimum.html

Polar sea ice could set ANOTHER record this year
Exceptionally large amounts of it down south right now
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/09/21/arctic_antarctic_sea_ice_record/

about 2 years ago
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Rapid Arctic Melt Called 'Planetary Emergency'

infodragon Re:Press coverage (757 comments)

[sarcasm] Scientists first observed global warming in 1895. Then in 1920 they said it was global cooling. Then in 1935 they said there was global warming, but then in 1975 they said it was the verge of a new Ice Age but then it became global warming again. But that is all old news. Let's stop talking about discredited work... [/sarcasm]

From generation to generation people have heard so much about global warming and global cooling that they don't believe what is being said now. "Back in my day the world was cooling and the US was going to be covered in ice in 50 years!" Kids grew up hearing that and those kids now have heard from their (grand)parents the opposite of what is being said now. So science was wrong before it is wrong now so give me my iPhone 7SSS!

Also we have become numb to almost everything due to the massive bombardment by the media of anything and everything. From the most important, the Kardashians, to the least, Global Warming. Oh yea and something about our embassies being attacked, somewhere in a desert...

The fault lies with us, as a population, not wanting to deal with what isn't going to affect us in the next week or two (oddly the time between most paychecks.) The masses are incurably ignorant. In any group large enough, most are idiots! So we continue to consume a scarce resource in moving about back and forth to the mall and think that consuming 2x as much to produce the equivalent in "bio-fuel" which is then consumed to go to the mall is "green."

The blind following the blind following the def.

I'm just in a bad mood today so take that into account.

about 2 years ago
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Microsoft Unveils First New Company Logo In 25 Years

infodragon Re:Looks like Metro tiles (378 comments)

M$ has too much cash on hand to be sold off. They'd have to hemorrhage quite a bit before they could be bought out. Either that or they could get rid of Ballmer!

about 2 years ago
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Microsoft Unveils First New Company Logo In 25 Years

infodragon Re:Looks like Metro tiles (378 comments)

“People liked NASCAR because the constant crashes made it exciting, and this gave me an idea...”
            -- Bill Gates on Microsoft Windows

Another brilliant idea, change the look of your brand as the exciting crash of the company begins.

For those of you not able to tell, this is my terrible attempt at humor.

about 2 years ago
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Recent Warming of Antarctica "Unusual But Not Unprecedented"

infodragon Re:Round 783 (163 comments)

Let the Global Warming flame-wars begin!

Scientists first observed global warming in 1895... But that is all old news. Let's stop talking about discredited work and move on...

I was responding to an obvious joke about flame wars with a not so obvious joke. Apparently being subtle is not appreciated and moderated as if it were truth.

about 2 years ago
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Recent Warming of Antarctica "Unusual But Not Unprecedented"

infodragon Re:Round 783 (163 comments)

Woosh!

about 2 years ago
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Recent Warming of Antarctica "Unusual But Not Unprecedented"

infodragon Re:Mod story down (163 comments)

It's not just /. groupthink...

One summer morning, scientists watching the expansion of mercury in a thermometer all realized: the Earth was getting hotter! If the trend continued unabated, spontaneous fires would start everywhere and entire forests, jungles, and cities would burn down. It was simple arithmetic.

Their eyes met and they knew they were all thinking the same thing: A soft life through endless government research grants. Lifetime sinecures not just for cousins of legislators! This was the first case of scientific consensus. In fact, science previously had not been conducted through votes and consensus at all. These scientists reached an equally unprecedented conclusion that has echoed through legislative hearing rooms ever since: The science is settled!

about 2 years ago
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Recent Warming of Antarctica "Unusual But Not Unprecedented"

infodragon Re:Round 783 (163 comments)

Scientists first observed global warming in 1895. Then in 1920 they said it was global cooling. Then in 1935 they said there was global warming, but then in 1975 they said it was the verge of a new Ice Age but then it became global warming again. But that is all old news. Let's stop talking about discredited work and move on...

about 2 years ago
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The Rapid Rise of License Plate Readers

infodragon Re:privacy? (302 comments)

If it works, it's illegal, by definition. IR license plate frames don't work though. With a good IR filter it will just look like a set of dull white LEDs around the perfectly readable plate.

I don't see anything *good* being installed by government contractors. It will take a few generations to get the filters as standard then it will take time for them to replace existing camera emplacements. Hopefully there will be enough outcry over such Orwellian surveillance that by the time the cameras would be properly curtailed.

I can also see the cameras used to issue speeding tickets. You are at point A at time X, then point B at time Y. Distance traveled over time traveled exceeds speed limit, citation issued.

In a semi-perfect world I would be happy to have these cameras up and running if the data was purged no more than once a week, excepting a court order.

more than 2 years ago
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Judge Suggests Apple Is "Smoking Crack" With Witness List In Samsung Case

infodragon Re:Please ignore... (318 comments)

LMAO. I checked /. before I left for work and didn't want to be tempted. I feel it was a mater of personal integrity not to mod posts in a story I submitted. I knew I would be tempted so I posted just before I hit the highway. It's better to remove temptation before you act and personally I try to conduct myself in manners of personal integrity no matter how big or small. Funny thing is I work in the financial industry and many of my peers would see this shameful, apparently so do many on /.

more than 2 years ago
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Judge Suggests Apple Is "Smoking Crack" With Witness List In Samsung Case

infodragon Please ignore... (318 comments)

Posting to remove ability to mod story I submitted.

more than 2 years ago

Submissions

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Birth of a black hole caught on camera

infodragon infodragon writes  |  about 10 months ago

infodragon (38608) writes "For the first time the birth of a black hole has been caught on camera. RAPTOR, or RAPid Telescopes for Optical Response, was able to quickly detect the initial changes that prompted a closer look. What resulted was the largest gamma ray burst ever detected and greater than theoretically possible. To say the least, this is a valuable and exciting find that will add to our understanding of the universe!"
Link to Original Source
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Apple: Don't make nuclear weapons using iTunes

infodragon infodragon writes  |  about a year ago

infodragon (38608) writes "Excerpt from EULA Paragraph G: "You also agree that you will not use these products for any purposes prohibited by United States law, including, without limitation, the development, design, manufacture or production of nuclear, missiles, or chemical or biological weapons.""
Link to Original Source
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How do you store sensitive data on your mobile devices?

infodragon infodragon writes  |  about a year and a half ago

infodragon (38608) writes "I'm just now seriously diving into the mobile world and have many questions surrounding all the devices, apps and options. However, one stands out; How do I protect sensitive data? On Linux this question is easy, I use RAID 1/5/6, depending on need, with LVM in the middle and topped with LUKS. This setup is very powerful and extremely flexible. Is it possible to match the strength of LUKS on Android? iOS? What are the solutions the /. crowd has used?"
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Triassic period (about 230 million years ago) mites found in amber

infodragon infodragon writes  |  about 2 years ago

infodragon (38608) writes "Some of the earliest fossils of pre-historic arthropods — dating to about 230 million years ago — have been discovered entombed in amber, PNAS journal reports.

The previous earliest records of arthropod-containing amber dated back to the Cretaceous period, around 135 million years ago."

Link to Original Source
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Inflammatory response linked to autism.

infodragon infodragon writes  |  about 2 years ago

infodragon (38608) writes "A few interesting quotes

"At least a subset of autism — perhaps one-third, and very likely more — looks like a type of inflammatory disease."

"These findings are important for many reasons, but perhaps the most noteworthy is that they provide evidence of an abnormal, continuing biological process. That means that there is finally a therapeutic target for a disorder defined by behavioral criteria like social impairments, difficulty communicating and repetitive behaviors. "

"One large Danish study, which included nearly 700,000 births over a decade, found that a mother’s rheumatoid arthritis, a degenerative disease of the joints, elevated a child’s risk of autism by 80 percent. Her celiac disease, an inflammatory disease prompted by proteins in wheat and other grains, increased it 350 percent. Genetic studies tell a similar tale. Gene variants associated with autoimmune disease — genes of the immune system — also increase the risk of autism, especially when they occur in the mother. ""

Link to Original Source
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Recent Antarctic Peninsula Warming began 600 years ago

infodragon infodragon writes  |  about 2 years ago

infodragon (38608) writes "Results published this week by a team of polar scientists from Britain, Australia and France adds a new dimension to our understanding of Antarctic Peninsula climate change and the likely causes of the break-up of its ice shelves.

The scientists reveal that the rapid warming of this region over the last 100 years has been unprecedented and came on top of a slower natural climate warming that began around 600 years ago"

Link to Original Source
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Judge Koh suggests Apple is "smoking crack" in Samsung case

infodragon infodragon writes  |  more than 2 years ago

infodragon (38608) writes "Today in the ongoing Apple vs Samsung court case Judge Lucy Koh’s patience wore thin as Apple presented a 75-page document highlighting 22 witnesses it would like to call in for rebuttal testimony, provided the court had the time. As those following the case closely know quite well, the case has a set number of hours which are already wearing quite thin. As quoted by The Verge as they sat in the courtroom listening in, Koh wondered aloud why Apple would offer the list “when unless you’re smoking crack you know these witnesses aren’t going to be called!”"
Link to Original Source
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Burglar nabbed after turning on Steve Jobs' stolen Macs

infodragon infodragon writes  |  more than 2 years ago

infodragon (38608) writes "Whoever broke into the home of the late Steve Jobs is probably now wishing that a different house had been the target.

The Palo Alto, Calif., home was robbed on July 17 of more than $60,000 in computers and other items, according to the Santa Clara County District Attorney's Office. Kariem McFarlin, a 35-year-old man, was arrested and charged with the crime and apparently it wasn't hard for police to catch him."

Link to Original Source
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The more science you know, the less worried you are about climate

infodragon infodragon writes  |  more than 2 years ago

infodragon (38608) writes "A US government-funded survey has found that Americans with higher levels of scientific and mathematical knowledge are more skeptical regarding the dangers of climate change than their more poorly educated fellow citizens...
Thus it is, according to the assembled profs, that the US government should seek to fund a communication strategy on climate change which is not focused on sound scientific information."

Link to Original Source
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Google project maps U.S. geothermal energy potenti

infodragon infodragon writes  |  more than 2 years ago

infodragon (38608) writes "Excluding inaccessible zones such as national parks and protected lands, the United States has enough geothermal energy, accessible using current methods, to generate 9,000 times as much power as our current coal output. http://www.forbes.com/sites/alexknapp/2011/10/26/google-funded-project-confirms-vast-potential-for-geothermal-energy/"
Link to Original Source
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A Drop Of Oil Completes a Maze As Well As a Rat

infodragon infodragon writes  |  more than 4 years ago

infodragon (38608) writes "Successfully navigating a complex maze is the basic lab test for intelligence. Rats can do it. Cuttlefish can do it. And now, inanimate droplets of oil can do it. By creating a pH gradient, scientists induced the an oil drop to navigate a maze, an advance with important applications in drug delivery, urban planning, and computer modeling."
Link to Original Source

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