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"Apache Killer" Web Server Hole Plugged

insane_coder Re:No name yet? (48 comments)

The fix was in Debian for a couple of days now. 2.2.16-6+squeeze2 is the patched version for stable.

more than 3 years ago
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C++ 2011 and the Return of Native Code

insane_coder Re:Why is C++ unmanaged? (616 comments)

SIGFPE. You can do some trickery to make your signal handler turn that into an exception somewhere.

more than 3 years ago
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What Is the Best Way To Build a Virtual Team?

insane_coder I actually work at a virtual company (175 comments)

I personally work at a virtual company, and aside from a neighbor which also works there, I have rarely met my coworkers in person. We use WebEx in order to have online meetings, and work on things together. We use Groopex Integrated Conferencing to integrate WebEx with our corporate site to easily schedule meetings and launch them. We use Google Apps to share various office documents around. We use MediaWiki to keep track of current projects, todo lists, documentation, and other important information. Lastly, for source code, we use various version control system with nice web frontends so the managers can see that we actually work on things.

For quick conversation with coworkers, we have an IRC server, and if we really need someone else urgently, we just pick up this archaic technology known as the "telephone".

more than 3 years ago
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ISO C++ Committee Approves C++0x Final Draft

insane_coder Re:My first question. (375 comments)

Er sorry, meant to say Item 4.

more than 2 years ago
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ISO C++ Committee Approves C++0x Final Draft

insane_coder Re:My first question. (375 comments)

See Effective STL Item 5. If size() is constant, then splice() must be implemented in a slower manner. Therefore, whether size() for std::list is constant or not depends on whether you want a fast or slow splice(), and that's up to the implementation. So conversely, you'll see that splice() in Visual C++ is quite slow.

more than 2 years ago
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Moodle 1.9 For Second Language Teaching

insane_coder They make products for this already (50 comments)

I don't know about a book. But there's products out there for using Moodle 1.9 integrated with online learning for live interactive classrooms. See Groopex Integrated Conferencing for example, which integrates Moodle with WebEx. I've already seen some language schools using this. I think that supersedes just using Moodle by itself as a language learning solution as this book describes.

about 4 years ago
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Affordable and Usable Video Conferencing?

insane_coder Gilaad (170 comments)

I work for an online university, we use web conferencing software from these guys. They have easy to use online tools for scheduling classes, and easily joining them from a central location. They also offer integration with Moodle which many universities now use. Their software also integrates with Microsoft's Live Meeting and Cisco's Webex, which have whiteboards, VoIP, desktop and application sharing, viewing multiple webcams, polling, raising hand, and so on.

more than 4 years ago
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Dashboard Reveals What Google Knows About You

insane_coder Re:Let's add a link. (260 comments)

I have that exact problem too, and I hate it.

about 5 years ago
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jQuery Dev Bemoans Overwhelming Spam On Google Groups

insane_coder Just Google Groups? (251 comments)

This isn't just Google Groups, Blogger is collapsing under spam too.
I myself just wrote about this the other day.

about 5 years ago
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Is HTTPTorrent the next-gen for web browsing?

insane_coder Re:I dont' know about you (2 comments)

Page loading can take a very long time for static content if it's sizable, and the server can't serve that much over its own connection. The topic for this is a bit misleading, it's not "HTTP Torrent", but "Dynamic HTTP" which although borrowing ideas from BitTorrent would be different and not suffer the same initial speed issues. Read the original article.

about 5 years ago
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Girl Electrocuted and Dies Tweeting In the Tub

insane_coder Horrible (27 comments)

"The incident has been quickly picked up by several members of the Twitter community, most of which have been shocked by the news."

Is this really an appropriate story to make such a pun?

more than 5 years ago
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Opera 10.0 Released, With Integrated Web Server Functionality

insane_coder Re:Acid 3 test (437 comments)

Personally, I've found that Safari which also has a history of scoring very high on these tests, has many rendering bugs that show up when rendering normal everyday webpages.

Most of those, the page is designed wrong, not Safari rendering them wrong.

more than 5 years ago
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New Linux kernel 2.6.30 native multitouch support

insane_coder How is this new? (1 comments)

We've been receiving multiple pointers in Linux ever since they added evdev. Details here.

more than 5 years ago
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Internet Explorer 6 Will Not Die

insane_coder Re:As Someone Who Has to Support IE6 at Work ... (531 comments)

My company now tells clients that if they want IE 6 support, it costs them 5-10% more. Suddenly when they hear it costs money, they don't want it so much anymore, and consider upgrading since they now have a tangible downside.
Many design firms actually include pricing calculations based on browsers supported, but they don't give the break down to their clients, so the clients don't realize they're paying a lot for IE 6.

more than 5 years ago
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Build an $800 Gaming PC

insane_coder $800? More like $300 (296 comments)

$800 for a gaming PC? I don't think that much was needed for a long time, unless you had to play the latest game on your 2600" screen with a high resolution. For roughly $300 these days, you can build a machine to play any game you want on a 19" screen. You don't really need anything more than a GeForce 9 (~$100), and a high end X2 (~$60). The other ~$140 is more than enough to get some RAM, hard drive, dvd burner, motherboard, especially if you find a deal on newegg or the like.
This here which is quite a decent machine is only $287 ($322 before rebates). Just add a DVD burner for ~$25, and you're all set.

more than 5 years ago
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Thai Gaming Sites Ordered Shut Down After Suicide

insane_coder Rating Games (82 comments)

Oh no, if they prevent kids committing suicide because of game deprivation, how am I supposed to know which new games are good?

more than 5 years ago
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The Hard Drive Is Inside the Computer

insane_coder It's all about the lights (876 comments)

This myth has been going on ever since computer cases added a light to them labeled hard drive. A user sees this light blinks whenever the computer is "working", or so they think, so obviously the box that does all the work is the hard drive.

more than 5 years ago
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Debian Gets FreeBSD Kernel Support

insane_coder Re:This is new? (425 comments)

Okay, summary is definitely wrong, Debian already supports four completely different kernels. See here.

more than 5 years ago
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Debian Gets FreeBSD Kernel Support

insane_coder This is new? (425 comments)

I must be missing something. I have a Debian FreeBSD Live CD from 2006. Here it was reported that Debian imported the FreeBSD Kernel over 4 years ago. What exactly happened now that is new?

more than 5 years ago

Submissions

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Why is anyone using OAuth 2.0?

insane_coder insane_coder writes  |  about a year and a half ago

insane_coder writes "The general consensus till now has been that OAuth 2.0 was an overly complicated and misdesigned framework resulting from an "unbridgeable conflict between the web and the enterprise worlds", where enterprise developers designed the framework completely contrary to the needs of the general web population.

New analysis demonstrates that the design of OAuth 2.0 runs completely counter to the needs of the enterprise market as well.

So if OAuth 2.0 isn't good for the web nor the enterprise, so who is it good for? And why is service after service switching to it, offering a confusing non-protocol, and crippling their capabilities?"

Link to Original Source
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insane_coder insane_coder writes  |  more than 7 years ago

insane_coder writes "The Insane Coding Blog has a nice story up about wether one can trust their applications. An interesting point from the article: "Not using a high level compiler or virtual machine gives us a layer of security in that it would be harder for one to pass out an 'evil compiler' that would understand what the developer was trying to do and instead have it do something malicious." If you're wondering where your 'evil compiler' would come from, "If you're using a Linux distro which offers binary packages, what really stops a package maintainer from compiling a modified application and putting that in the distro's repositories?""
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insane_coder insane_coder writes  |  more than 7 years ago

insane_coder writes "I wrote a short article explaining the virtues of file descriptors, and how file management security is now going to get much better and easier to program with soon to be standardized functions, yet why we can't make good use of it. I also propose what we may be able to do to fix it."
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insane_coder insane_coder writes  |  about 8 years ago

insane_coder writes "I'm a software developer who writes a lot of freeware utilities in C/C++ which are all cross platform and work well. Lately some of my users have been pestering me to stop wasting precious development time supporting minority OSs like Linux, and get more work done for the majority — the Windows users.

Now all of my utilities are simple tools that perform various operations on files such as compression or rearranging. I've also made a few frontends for them using the excellent Qt library to allow the user to select a file and process using a simple GUI.
In the dozens of applications I wrote, most of them several thousand lines long, I haven't written a single conditional for any particular OS. When I release, I just compile each app for all the OSs I have access to and post them on my website. I barely expend any effort at all to achieve portability.

So the question I have to ask is: "Why do the masses perceive portability as something that requires effort and a waste of time?" Most applications don't do anything fancy or need to talk to devices and therefor there is no need to do anything special other than compile them on a particular OS to run on that OS. So why are there so many simple apps using native APIs to do simple things like file reading instead of the standard ones? Why are we projecting an image that one must go out of their way or switch to a different language in order to achieve portability?"

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