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Dell's Hot Air Video: Parody or Lapse in Judgment?

itwbennett Dell confirms it's not their video (1 comments)

Gizmodo is calling shenanigans and the Dell Twitter account confirmed it's not their video. But Dell also seems to be OK with it, which I suppose just means they believe there is no bad press.

more than 2 years ago
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FoxConn Faces Mass Suicide Prrotest

itwbennett In related news... (1 comments)

A Microsoft investigation of the protest has found that workers aren't complaining about working conditions, but about 'staffing assignments and transfer policies'.

more than 2 years ago
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E-Mail Can Reveal Your Friend Hierarchy

itwbennett Re:Is this an article from 2005? (85 comments)

My thoughts exactly. Email is so 5-10 years ago. If I'm communicating only with people who are in their 40s, then maybe this study has some merit. But anyone in their 20s is using facebook (incl facebook chat) or texting. And folks on the other end of the age spectrum are probably using the phone.

more than 2 years ago
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Microsoft Now Collects Royalties From Over Half of All Android Devices

itwbennett ChromeOS also implicated as infringing patents (241 comments)

What's notable this time around is that ChromeOS is also implicated as an infringing technology. Compal is now the third ODM company to enter into a Microsoft agreement over ChromeOS and Android. Brian Proffitt goes into more detail in this blog post: http://www.itworld.com/mobile-wireless/215897/microsoft-why-innovate-when-you-can-litigate

more than 2 years ago
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Paywalled NYT Now Has 300,000 Online Subscribers

itwbennett Need more numbers (179 comments)

Is 300k subscribers good? What percentage of total online readers is that? Also, sure, a 6% increase in digital advertising revenue is good, in that any increase is good. But what sort of increase did comparable websites see?

more than 2 years ago
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Lack of Technology Puts Star Wars Series On Hold

itwbennett Define cost effective (309 comments)

How 'cost effective' does it need to be when it's got a guaranteed audience of male tweens, teens, 20s ... plus all the geek girls. And the nostalgia audience too (that's my demographic, btw.).

more than 3 years ago
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Using Flywheels to Meet Peak Power Grid Demands

itwbennett taking stock (325 comments)

Hoping the attention of the slashdot community will do good things for the Beacon stock I bought.

more than 3 years ago
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35% Use Mobile Apps Before Getting Out of Bed

itwbennett Numbers are higher for nighttime checkins (180 comments)

Also, not surprisingly, 72% check Facebook from bed before going to sleep and 20% check Twitter. That's what happens when you keep your smartphone on your nightstand and/or work on your laptop into the wee hours.

more than 3 years ago
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Detained MS Employee Freed By Libyan Gov't?

itwbennett Microsoft confirms release (1 comments)

The blog post linked to above has been updated. Microsoft has confirmed that Khalid Elhasumi was indeed freed on Tuesday.

more than 3 years ago
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SlashTweaks Let YOU Micro-Edit Slashdot

itwbennett madlibs live! (257 comments)

Only snarkier

more than 3 years ago
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Firing Phraseology: 'Pursure Other Interests'?

itwbennett headline typo (2 comments)

'Pursure' should be 'Pursue'.

more than 3 years ago
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Why Dumbphones Still Dominate, For Now

itwbennett Re:Price (618 comments)

I agree. It's all about the "ridiculous pricing model". I may reconsider when smartphone data plans are bundled in with Internet, phone, cable TV. Until then, I'll do my Internet-enabling on my laptop and calling on my dumb phone (which, btw, is prepaid and hardly ever used). Sorry, AT&T, Verizon.

more than 3 years ago

Submissions

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This is Tim: How Tim Cook is Becoming the Un-Jobs

itwbennett itwbennett writes  |  5 days ago

itwbennett (1594911) writes "Back in June, the New York Times ran an article (which was picked up by Slashdot) about how Tim Cook is putting his own stamp on Apple. That article, though, focused mainly on personality and style, and ITworld's Andy Patrizio has followed up with a collection of some of the technical, business, and product decisions Cook has made — from embracing the enterprise to dumping Objective C — that let us know we're firmly in the Tim Cook Era."
Link to Original Source
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FCC Allowed To Question AT&T, Verizon On Business Broadband Pricing

itwbennett itwbennett writes  |  about a week ago

itwbennett (1594911) writes "The White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has given the FCC permission to collect new data in the long-running dispute over special access pricing. AT&T and Verizon Communications control an estimated 80 percent of the special access market, and competitors have complained for years that the two dominant telecom carriers are charging excessive prices for special access services. The FCC circulated a proposed order on special access in mid-2012, but late that year, also asked for comments on the special access market. Those comments aren't due until late this year."
Link to Original Source
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Why Chinese Hackers Would Want US Hospital Patient Data

itwbennett itwbennett writes  |  about a week ago

itwbennett (1594911) writes "In a follow-up to yesterday's story about the Chinese hackers who stole hospital data of 4.5 million patients, IDG News Service's Martyn Williams set out to learn why the data, which didn't include credit card information was so valuable. The answer is depressingly simple: people without health insurance can potentially get treatment by using medical data of one of the hacking victims. John Halamka, chief information officer of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and chairman of the New England Healthcare Exchange Network, said a medical record can be worth between $50 and $250 to the right customer — many times more than the amount typically paid for a credit card number, or the cents paid for a user name and password. 'If I am one of the 50 million Americans who are uninsured ... and I need a million-dollar heart transplant, for $250 I can get a complete medical record including insurance company details,' he said."
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Hackers Steal Data On 4.5 Million US Hospital Patients

itwbennett itwbennett writes  |  about two weeks ago

itwbennett (1594911) writes "Community Health Systems said the attack occurred in April and June of this year, but it wasn't until July that it determined the theft had taken place. Working with a computer security company, it determined the attack was carried out by a group based in China that used 'highly sophisticated malware' to attack its systems. The hackers got away with patient names, addresses, birthdates, telephone numbers and Social Security numbers of the 4.5 million people who were referred to or received services from doctors affiliated with the company in the last five years. The stolen data did not include patient credit card, medical or clinical information."
Link to Original Source
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Vehicle-To-Vehicle Networks Could Save Over 1,000 Lives a Year

itwbennett itwbennett writes  |  about a week ago

itwbennett (1594911) writes "On Monday, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) published a research report on vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) technology and is seeking input from the public and industry. In the report, it estimated the safety benefits of just two possible applications of V2V, called Left Turn Assist and Intersection Movement Assist. Together, they could prevent as many as 592,000 crashes and save 1,083 lives per year, the agency said."
Link to Original Source
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Baidu Partners With U.N. To Tackle E-waste In China

itwbennett itwbennett writes  |  about two weeks ago

itwbennett (1594911) writes "A Web-based app called "Baidu Recycle Station" launched Monday as part a new joint lab established by Baidu and the United Nations Development Program that will use Baidu's Internet services and data analytics to develop programs targeted at helping the environment, health care, education and more. The app is meant to help streamline the recycling of e-waste in China by helping users easily sell their old electronics to legitimate recycling factories. And none too soon: The country is the second largest producer of electronic trash, creating over 3.6 million tons of it each year, according to a U.N. study."
Link to Original Source
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Groundwork Layed For Superfast Broadband Over Copper

itwbennett itwbennett writes  |  about two weeks ago

itwbennett (1594911) writes "Telecom equipment vendor Adtran has developed a technology that will make it easier for operators to roll out broadband speeds close to 500Mbps over copper lines. Adtran's FDV (Frequency Division Vectoring), enhances the capabilities of two technologies — VDSL2 with vectoring and G.fast — by enabling them to better coexist over a single subscriber line, the company said. VDSL2 with vectoring, which improves speeds by reducing noise and can deliver up to 150Mbps, is currently being rolled out by operators, while G.fast, which is capable of 500Mbps, is still under development, with the first deployments coming in mid-2015. FDV will make it easier for operators to roll out G.fast once it's ready and expand where it can be used, according to Adtran."
Link to Original Source
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I'll Have What She's Having: Top Technologies Startups Are Using

itwbennett itwbennett writes  |  about two weeks ago

itwbennett (1594911) writes "Leo Polovets, a former LinkedIn and Google engineer turned VC, recently examined data from AngelList, an online community for startups, looking at the self-reported use of technologies by startups. Here's a sampling of what came out on top: JavaScript is by far the dominant programming language choice, followed by Ruby and Python. MongoDB is tops in databases, followed by MySQL. And AWS was the clear top choice for infrastructure and hosting."
Link to Original Source
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Telegram Not Dead STOP Alive, Evolving In Japan STOP

itwbennett itwbennett writes  |  about two weeks ago

itwbennett (1594911) writes "Japan is one of the last countries in the world where telegrams are still widely used. A combination of traditional manners, market liberalization and innovation has kept alive this age-old form of messaging. Companies affiliated with the country's three mobile carriers, NTT DoCoMo, KDDI and SoftBank, offer telegrams, which are sent via modern server networks instead of the dedicated electrical wires of the past (Morse telegraphy hasn't been used since 1962), and then printed out with modern printers instead of tape glued on paper. But customers are still charged according to the length of the message, which is delivered within three hours. A basic NTT telegram up to 25 characters long can be sent for ¥440 ($4.30) when ordered online."
Link to Original Source
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Cisco Slashing Up To 6,000 Jobs

itwbennett itwbennett writes  |  about two weeks ago

itwbennett (1594911) writes "Cisco Systems will cut as many as 6,000 jobs over the next 12 months, saying it needs to shift resources to growing businesses such as cloud, software and security. Cisco has about 74,000 employees, so the cuts will affect about 8 percent of its staff. The move will be a reorganization rather than a net reduction, the company said. It needs to cut jobs because the product categories where it sees the strongest growth, such as security, require special skills, so it needs to make room for workers in those areas, it said."
Link to Original Source
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Study: Firmware Plagued by Poor Encryption and Backdoors

itwbennett itwbennett writes  |  about two weeks ago

itwbennett (1594911) writes "The first large-scale analysis of firmware has revealed poor security practices that could present opportunities for hackers probing the Internet of Things. Researchers with Eurecom, a technology-focused graduate school in France, developed a web crawler that plucked more than 30,000 firmware images from the websites of manufacturers including Siemens, Xerox, Bosch, Philips, D-Link, Samsung, LG and Belkin. In one instance, the researchers found a Linux kernel that was 10 years out of date bundled in a recently released firmware image. They also uncovered 41 digital certificates in firmware that were self-signed and contained a private RSA encryption key and 326 instances of terms that could indicate the presence of a backdoor."
Link to Original Source
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Oracle Sues Oregon Over Troubled Obamacare Website

itwbennett itwbennett writes  |  about two weeks ago

itwbennett (1594911) writes "Blaming 'bureaucratic dysfunction,’ Oracle has sued Oregon for breach of contract, seeking more than $20 million in fees the state is withholding for its work on Cover Oregon, a troubled insurance exchange website developed as part of President Barack Obama's health care policy overhaul. The move is a preemptive strike by Oracle against Oregon, whose governor, John Kitzhaber, has advocated suing Oracle."
Link to Original Source
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China Cracks Down On Mobile Messaging

itwbennett itwbennett writes  |  about three weeks ago

itwbennett (1594911) writes "China is tightening control over mobile messaging services with new rules that limit their role in spreading news. Under the new regulations, only news agencies and other groups with official approval can publish whatever the government considers political news via public accounts. 'All other public accounts that have not been approved cannot release or reprint political news,' the regulations said. Users of the instant messaging services will also have to register with their official IDs, and agree to follow relevant laws."
Link to Original Source
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Google Lowers Search Ranking of Websites That Don't Use Encryption

itwbennett itwbennett writes  |  about three weeks ago

itwbennett (1594911) writes "Google is taking Internet security into its own hands, punishing sites that don't use encryption by giving them lower search rankings. The use of https is now one of the signals, like whether a Web page has unique content, that Google uses to determine where a site will appear in search rankings, although it will be a 'lightweight' signal and applies to about 1 percent of search queries now, wrote Zineb Ait Bahajji and Gary Illyes, both Google webmaster trends analysts, in a blog post."
Link to Original Source
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Massive Russian Hack Has Researchers Scratching Their Heads

itwbennett itwbennett writes  |  about three weeks ago

itwbennett (1594911) writes "Some security researchers on Wednesday said it's still unclear just how serious Hold Security's discovery of a massive database of stolen credentials really is. 'The only way we can know if this is a big deal is if we know what the information is and where it came from,' said Chester Wisniewski, a senior security advisor at Sophos. 'But I can't answer that because the people who disclosed this decided they want to make money off of this. There's no way for others to verify.' Wisniewski was referring to an offer by Hold Security to notify website operators if they were affected, but only if they sign up for its breach notification service, which starts at $120 per year."
Link to Original Source
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Monkey Selfie, Aboriginal Language Among Wikipedia Copyright Takedown Requests

itwbennett itwbennett writes  |  about three weeks ago

itwbennett (1594911) writes "Wikimedia, which operates Wikipedia, published its first transparency report Wednesday detailing two years of alteration and takedown requests as well as requests for user data it received. Of the 304 general content removal requests, none were granted, Wikimedia said in a blog post. And while the amount of copyright takedown requests was notably low, the requests that were made included a selfie taken by a black macaque monkey and an entire aboriginal language, among other eyebrow-raising items."
Link to Original Source
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How Your Dropcam Live Feed Being Watched?

itwbennett itwbennett writes  |  about three weeks ago

itwbennett (1594911) writes "Patrick Wardle and Colby Moore, both of whom work for security firm Synack, will show at Defcon how a Dropcam could turn into a Trojan horse. Here are the basics: Moore and Wardle plucked the private and public SSL certificates from the Dropcam they analyzed. With those in hand, it would be possible for them to view videos a person has stored or upload their own videos that would appear to have come from a specific Dropcam. 'It would allow an attacker to basically hijack or take over the video stream,' Wardle said. For its part, Nest, which acquired Dropcam in June, maintains that such an attack would require physical access to a Dropcam: 'The Synack folks were not able to remotely compromise any of our cameras — only ones they had physical access to,' wrote spokeswoman Kate Brinks. But it's not far fetched that an attacker could buy a Dropcam and give it as a gift to someone, essentially a Trojan horse attack that opens up their video to monitoring."
Link to Original Source
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Oracle Hits Back At Claims Over In-Memory Database Option's Sneaky Fees

itwbennett itwbennett writes  |  about a month ago

itwbennett (1594911) writes "In a personal blog post last week, ex-Oracle employee Kevin Closson said that Oracle database shops might unwittingly find themselves hit with pricey license fees if an audit turned up accidental usage of the in-memory option, which is turned on by default latest release of Database 12c. In a blog post late Monday, Maria Colgan, an Oracle product manager, responded to the claims, saying that while in-memory 'has been seamlessly integrated into the core of the database as a new component of the Shared Global Area (SGA),' it is not turned on by default. She then went on to spell out in detail the steps needed to enable the feature."
Link to Original Source
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Guns, Vandals, and Thieves: Data Shows US Telecom Networks Under Attack

itwbennett itwbennett writes  |  about a month ago

itwbennett (1594911) writes "Since 2007, the U.S. telecom infrastructure has been targeted by more than a thousand malicious acts that resulted in severe outages, (those affecting at least 900,000 minutes of user calls, or when it impacts 911 service, major military installations, key government facilities, nuclear power plants or major airports) according to data obtained from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) under the Freedom of Information Act. For the last three years, vandalism was the single biggest cause of outages identified, accounting for just over a third of the incidents in each year. Gun shots accounted for 9 percent of the outages in 2013, 7 percent in 2012 and 4 percent in 2011. Cable theft accounted for roughly similar levels — 4 percent of outages in 2013, 8 percent in 2012 and 7 percent in 2011. The FCC didn't list all the causes."
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