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China Cuts Off Some VPNs

jaa101 Re:Defective by design. (216 comments)

By using different protocol numbers in the IP headers, the designers of these protocols [...] made them harder to support, because routers have to explicitly know how to handle those nonstandard protocol numbers.

How do nonstandard protocol numbers make it harder for routers to route the packet? You have the destination IP: just forward the packet already. Oh, you want to be a firewall and block selected traffic or even do deep packet inspection? That's not routing.

about a week ago
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Being Pestered By Drones? Buy a Drone-Hunting Drone

jaa101 Re:Inevitible (151 comments)

Yes, anti-personnel is the danger. I wouldn't be surprised if the secret service don't already jam potential drone control frequencies for their high-value people. The real danger is with autonomous drones that use GPS or, worse, are smart enough to do without it. These things could be a poor man's mini cruise missile.

about two weeks ago
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Virgin Galactic To Launch 2,400 Comm. Satellites To Offer Ubiquitous Broadband

jaa101 Kessler Syndrome Alert (123 comments)

That many satellites could tip us over the space junk critical mass threshold. If a spacecraft is hit by something it tends to send debris flying everywhere. Some of the pieces can then hit other spacecraft causing more debris. Once you have enough spacecraft in orbit -- critical mass -- the chain reaction sustains itself long enough to destroying many spacecraft in the same orbital region. It's called the Kessler syndrome.

about two weeks ago
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Uber Suspends Australian Transport Inspector Accounts To Block Stings

jaa101 Re:illegal taxi:$100 Obstruction of justice: jail (299 comments)

The contract wouldn't be between Uber and the government. The contract would be between Uber and the private individual who also happens to be a transport inspector, not even a police officer. Remember, it's a sting operation so they're not going to register as a government department. It's not so clear to me that this would fail in a civil case. Are there laws voiding contract terms that impede government officials in their duties? Lawyers anywhere?

I think $2000 would be a better number for Uber to try since it would be much more likely to be under the limit of a government-issued credit card but still more than the fine. They could be more subtle by making the passenger responsible for any financial consequences of their actions during the ride. That looks more innocuous but, with the right legal phraseology, could still cover transport inspectors' fines. But, as correctly noted, this is the way to get new legislation.

about two weeks ago
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Uber Suspends Australian Transport Inspector Accounts To Block Stings

jaa101 Re:poor summary (299 comments)

Could be treated just like speeding and red light camera tickets. The ticket is issued to the registered owner of the car.

Apparently not under the existing laws. If they go to the trouble of changing the law I think they'll go a different way, like nasty penalties for repeat offences and, more likely, finding a way to hit Uber directly with some conspiracy to offend law with huge penalties for corporations.

about two weeks ago
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Uber Suspends Australian Transport Inspector Accounts To Block Stings

jaa101 Re:The most beautiful thing ever! (299 comments)

The problem, noted in TFA, is that the existing legislation doesn't have provisions for higher penalties for repeat offenders. Currently it seems they can't do anything more than fine them $1700 per infringement. Uber is paying the drivers' fines for them.

about two weeks ago
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Uber Suspends Australian Transport Inspector Accounts To Block Stings

jaa101 Re:poor summary (299 comments)

They could also wait a week to issue the fines

I don't see how this could work. They need to confirm the driver's identity to issue the fine which they're not going to be able to do without confronting the driver at the time of the ride. Just knowing the vehicle's registration isn't enough.

about two weeks ago
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SpaceX Rocket Launch Succeeds, But Landing Test Doesn't

jaa101 Re:what about a net? (213 comments)

These rockets are really big. The square/cube means that big things are not as strong as little ones. Get two toy cars and smash them into each other. Now try the same thing with two full sized vehicles and compare the results. Sure you could catch a model rocket with a butterfly net and it will fly again. This idea just doesn't scale up.

about three weeks ago
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Extra Leap Second To Be Added To Clocks On June 30

jaa101 Re: Leap hour (289 comments)

There's already "Ephemeris Time" (ET) that doesn't have leap seconds. It's now exactly 26 seconds different from UTC. Go ahead and use that for system time if you like.

about three weeks ago
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When FISA Court Rejects a Surveillance Request, the FBI Issues a NSL Instead

jaa101 Re:Not that I have anything to worry about but (119 comments)

Isn't this what Wikileaks is for? Send it there first and then tip off media outlets. Of course the anonymity feature of Wikileaks is not so important in this case since they can probably guess who leaked it but it's still going to be hard to take down.

about 1 month ago
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Bellard Creates New Image Format To Replace JPEG

jaa101 Re:BPG natively supports 8 to 14 bits per channel (377 comments)

Like I said, TIFF is a container format. Saying that TIFF supports BPG is just like saying that HTML supports BPG. It's great in principle ... until someone sends you a TIFF file that uses a codec that your reader doesn't support. So I genuinely have no idea; what's the current list of software like that will correctly handle a TIFF with a BPG-encoded image inside. For example, when did/will libtiff and Photoshop first get support?

I'm not saying that BPG files are any better in this respect at this stage, though the JavaScript decoder is nice. Obviously any JavaScript TIFF decoder would need to be _much_ bigger that the BPG

about 1 month ago
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Bellard Creates New Image Format To Replace JPEG

jaa101 Transparency is supported. Pronounciation? (377 comments)

Note that, according to the BPG web site, "An alpha channel is supported" so BPG has transparency.

How are we going to pronounce this thing? "Bee-Peg" I suppose since "Bee-Pee-Gee" doesn't roll off the tongue.

Looks good.

about 1 month ago
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Bellard Creates New Image Format To Replace JPEG

jaa101 BPG natively supports 8 to 14 bits per channel (377 comments)

From the web site "BPG natively supports 8 to 14 bits per channel," which is a huge advantage. 8 bits is more of a straight-jacket than people realise and this offers a more portable way for people to pass around high bit-depth issues than camera raw files (proprietary things inside) or TIFF (a complex container format prone to cross-platform issues and poor compression).

about 1 month ago
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Australia Pushes Ahead With Website Blocking In Piracy Fight

jaa101 Re: Halfwits indeed (100 comments)

Sorry, I was posting from a mobile so citing was not practical. See:

"A Treatise on the theory and practice of Seamanship", Richard Hall Gower, 1808, p. v-vi.

https://books.google.com/books...

"In justice to the Author, it becomes necessary for him to state, that during his late voyage to India, Mr. Steel*, a bookseller, of Union-row, Little Tower-hill, republished nearly the whole of the 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th chapters of the first edition of this work, in a voluminous Compilation termed, "Elements and Practice of Rigging and Seamanship." However illiberal such treatment must appear to the truly generous mind, the Author Would the more freely forgive Mr. Steel had he not* by artfully endeavouring to evade the piracy, been guilty of such misrepresentation, as has a tendency to bring his professional knowledge in question. Several deviations of this sort are contained in the 2d volume, 4to, of Mr. Steel's work, and are produced to shew that the Author has just reason for complaining."

about 1 month ago
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Australia Pushes Ahead With Website Blocking In Piracy Fight

jaa101 Re: Halfwits indeed (100 comments)

The term "piracy" has been used for illegal copying for over 200 years. Not saying it's appropriate but it's definitely established usage.

about 2 months ago
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Virginia Court: LEOs Can Force You To Provide Fingerprint To Unlock Your Phone

jaa101 Re:Passwords Shouldn't Be Protected (328 comments)

I definitely agree that it should take more than a simple demand from police before you have to provide a password, or any other form of authentication, for access to your data. Glad I don't live in VA. My only point was that the root of the inconsistency here between biometrics and passwords can be traced to the idea that passwords have fifth amendment protection. There are definitely many issues with requiring passwords in any circumstances, including claims to have forgotten them and around steganography. Passwords have the advantage that, even if you can be legally required to give them up, there's no way to force you do so. The most they might legally do (one would hope) is have you rot in gaol indefinitely.

about 2 months ago
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Virginia Court: LEOs Can Force You To Provide Fingerprint To Unlock Your Phone

jaa101 Passwords Shouldn't Be Protected (328 comments)

The anomaly here is due to the idea that fifth amendment protections should apply to passwords. Passwords can't be incriminating*; they only provide access to existing material that might be incriminating. There have been decisions both ways on this but my money is that eventually SCOTUS will rule that passwords are not protected.

* One potential loophole might be where someone claims their password itself is incriminating. I think the best solution here would be to allow "use immunity" for passwords and remove the rule about derived evidence for this situation.

about 2 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: VPN Setup To Improve Latency Over Multiple Connections?

jaa101 Re:LACP (174 comments)

LACP is a layer 2 solution, i.e., it works at the ethernet level. The requirement here is for a layer 3 solution that works on the Internet. My guess is that there's nothing off the shelf so he'll have to start coding.

about 4 months ago
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Apollo 11 Moon Landing Turns 45

jaa101 Almost Beyond Living Memory (211 comments)

The saddest part about this is that soon, probably, we'll live in a world where there's no living memory of what it's like to walk on another world. Armstrong and his successors are no longer young and none of the projects to return to the moon or to go to Mars look likely to happen quickly enough. Who in 1972 would have thought that they were watching the end or an era instead of the beginning? I don't think anyone's made it past 1000 miles up since then.

about 6 months ago
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Eyes Over Compton: How Police Spied On a Whole City

jaa101 Re:Is it really much more than goes on already? (190 comments)

This system is going to see plenty of things that aren't "in public", even without peeping in windows. What is your expectation of privacy in your backyard? Could there be a constitutional up-side in the US though? Maybe everyone will be able to have their cases thrown out due to the warrantless surveillance conducted on them prior to their arrest.

about 9 months ago

Submissions

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China Cuts Off Some VPNs

jaa101 jaa101 writes  |  about a week ago

jaa101 (627731) writes "The Register (UK) and the Global Times (China) report Foreign VPN service unavailable in China. A quote sourced to "one of the founders of an overseas website which monitors the Internet in China" claimed The Great Firewall is blocking the VPN on the protocol level. It means that the firewall does not need to identify each VPN provider and block its IP addresses. Rather, it can spot VPN traffic during transit and block it. An upgrade of the Great Firewall of China is blamed and China appears to be backing the need for the move to maintain cyberspace sovereignty."
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Uber Suspends Transport Inpector Accounts to Block Stings

jaa101 jaa101 writes  |  about two weeks ago

jaa101 (627731) writes "In Australia Uber is reportedly suspending the accounts used by government transport inspectors conducting sting operations. The article suggests that a new handset, credit card and email account are all needed to get a new, unblocked account. If inspectors can only issue one or two fines before they're blocked then the sting operations will cost more than the fines. Presumably the Uber app can block based on IMEI, SIM and/or phone number."
Link to Original Source
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Athlete injured as (claimed) hacked drone filming race falls to ground

jaa101 jaa101 writes  |  about 10 months ago

jaa101 (627731) writes "The owner of a drone, which fell and reportedly hit an athlete competing in a triathlon in Western Australia's Mid West, has said he believes the device was "hacked" into."
Link to Original Source
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Facebook Won't Take Down Undercover Cop Page in Australia

jaa101 jaa101 writes  |  more than 2 years ago

jaa101 writes "Facebook has refused a request from Australian police to take down a page with details of undercover police vehicles saying saying it cannot stop people taking photos in public places. The original story is at http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/victoria/facebook-page-reveals-details-of-unmarked-police-cars/story-e6frf7kx-1226499939251 (paywall) but it doesn't give a link to the relevant page which seems to be at https://www.facebook.com/pages/VIC-Undercover-Police-Cars/131769163636069?ref=ts&fref=ts . This page for the state of Victoria has 12000 likes but a similar page for the state of Queensland has over 34000 at https://www.facebook.com/pages/QLD-undercover-police-cars/173981759325151?ref=ts&fref=ts and there are other Australian pages too."
Link to Original Source
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Assange asylum / electronic bracelet link

jaa101 jaa101 writes  |  more than 2 years ago

jaa101 writes "A late-night visit by the security contractor who maintained the electronic bracelet around Julian Assange's ankle was one reason why he decided to seek political asylum in the Ecuador embassy in London."
Link to Original Source
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Microsoft Pushes Skype with Windows Update

jaa101 jaa101 writes  |  more than 2 years ago

jaa101 writes "Came in this morning to find many of our corporate boxes sporting shiny new Skype installations. Looks like they've been pushed by Microsoft. We have a WSUS server so the administrators of that may have overlooked something. There's discussion at http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-GB/winserverwsus/thread/74a93b2b-e820-40ef-a45d-2815b57d164e with Microsoft claims that they only pushed if there was a Skype installation there already ... and refutations. Maybe our SoE had something in it that fooled the updater but the affected machines had nothing like a working Skype.
Was Microsoft running short of Skype supernodes? I guess it's likely to slow down Windows machines with unwanted services and use plenty of unwanted traffic for both home and corporate users. And these will be people who haven't agreed to the Skype ToS! We're using XP but probably Vista and 7 are affected too. Please Microsoft, release a new update to remove these unwanted installations."
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Australian ISP's Copyright Win

jaa101 jaa101 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

jaa101 writes "Medium-sized Australian ISP iiNet has won a copyright case against the major movie studios. Local studio Village Roadshow was joined by 33 others, including the US majors, in arguing that iiNet was not doing enough to stop its users pirating content. iiNet may have been chosen as a target big enough to set an example but small enough to beat. Today's victory was on appeal in the Australian Federal Court, confirming an earlier ruling a year ago that was won with costs."
Link to Original Source

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