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Windows Tax Shot Down In Italy

jader3rd Re:Not of i*Devices (418 comments)

The vendor is a different party. Hence you cannot buy a "HP" or "Sony" or "Samsung" or "Asus" computer without Windows on it.

Wait, what? Every single last vendor you mentioned there sells devices that run OS's which are competitors to Windows. All of those vendors sells devices with Android, some sell Chromebooks, and some even sells computers with Linux.

5 days ago
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Windows Tax Shot Down In Italy

jader3rd Re:Separate hardware from software (418 comments)

Most people do not. Keep trolling for Microsoft.

Really? How many people do you know (who don't read Slashdot) go shopping for Cellular service without also purchasing a phone from the Cellular provider at the same time? How many people do you know expect an ISP to provide a modem when they order 'internet' service. I would love to make it illegal to prevent the same companies from providing both the service and the device to access the service, but that never flies. When something goes both the device manufacturer and the service provider will blame the other one for why your experience isn't working.

I'm aware that there are no technical limitations preventing swapping out hardware to interface with different services, but that's not what the voting public wants.

5 days ago
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Windows Tax Shot Down In Italy

jader3rd Re:Separate hardware from software (418 comments)

You mean we can't have a check-box on the PC vendor's web page where we configure our device, which lists several operating systems?

You can. But people will freak out when that checkbox would say "Linux + $80". They would think "But Linux is free". While it is a free OS, the OEM wouldn't get subsidies from bloatware providers which help subsidies the cost of the computer.

5 days ago
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German Court: Google Must Stop Ignoring Customer E-mails

jader3rd Re:What is a customer? (290 comments)

If Google decides to discontinue all Google services in Germany as a result, would that really be a "win" for the German consumer?

It can be, if German consumers are left with options that do conform to the law.

5 days ago
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Windows Tax Shot Down In Italy

jader3rd Re:What about other devices? (418 comments)

But do they make their money back though ads and forcing users to use Google Search and Google email, etc.. Or do they make money licencing their OS?

They actually pay vendors to put Android on devices, because of the increased revenue they get from active Android users.

5 days ago
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Windows Tax Shot Down In Italy

jader3rd Re:Separate hardware from software (418 comments)

A law that forbids selling hardware and software together would increase innovation. Consumers would only be able to buy hardware and software separately. That way, hardware vendors are encouraged to document the hardware and software vendors will compete on quality. Installation procedures would become very easy very quickly due to market pressure.

Normal people don't like that though. Let's say that you try and sell product A to somebody that requires product B to function. This person has neither used nor ever had interest in A or B. Most people aren't interested in one or the other. Normal people want an A+B product where somebody else has worked out all of the compatibility problems.

5 days ago
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When Scientists Give Up

jader3rd Re:Doesn't surprise me (347 comments)

I'm honestly surprised that scientists arn't yet being marched into concentration camps at gunpoint.

We're planning that for this weekend.

about a week ago
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Ask Slashdot: What Are the Strangest Features of Various Programming Languages?

jader3rd Re:Many languages and... (729 comments)

Two reasons not to do that. First, "2." in at least some of those is a floating-point 2, so "i = 2." by itself would be ambiguous: does this assign an integer 2 and end the statement, or assign a floating-point 2. (and writing 2.0 doesn't really clarify, but rather raises the question of whether the 0 starts another statement). Second, all the old COBOL programmers who escaped that ecosystem would have something like anti-LSD-style flashbacks, and that can be dangerous.

That's still workable. A period followed by an end of line, or whitespace is the end of statement. A period that's between two numbers is a floating point number. A period surrounded by non-numbers and non-whitespace is a compilation error. I realize that the ship might have sailed as far as this is concerned, but if done originally I think it would have helped a lot of people ramp up on how to code.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: What Are the Strangest Features of Various Programming Languages?

jader3rd Re: Powershell (729 comments)

Given that most PowerShell scripting is developed against live environments it seems necessary to be very explicit that you want to do a comparison instead of an assignment. A mistake we've all made in C. = and == are just too close to each other.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: What Are the Strangest Features of Various Programming Languages?

jader3rd Re:Many languages and... (729 comments)

It's not a quirk if pretty much every fukin language does it.

Yes, but if you're learning your first programming language you wonder why the end of statement character differs from the same one that you use when writing.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: What Are the Strangest Features of Various Programming Languages?

jader3rd Re:Many languages and... (729 comments)

That pesky ";" statement terminator... I guess you had to uses something, but it causes me the most trouble..

C, C++, Pascal, Perl, Java, C#, bash/sh, ksh, JavaScript..... The list goes on..

They should have used the '.' character to end a statement. It's the same one used in written language.

about two weeks ago
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FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler Says Switching ISPs Is Too Hard

jader3rd Re:Seriously? (145 comments)

My wife doesn't want to switch our ISP because her main e-mail address uses that at the domain name, and maybe a thousand friends, business contacts, and acquaintances have it as her contact info.

I've switched ISP's and my old ISP still keeps alive the email address they created for me. I don't use it for much, but it's quite possible it would be more effort for the ISP to disable the mailbox than it is for them to keep it running.
Besides, lots of people have 'connected' accounts via Facebook, gmail, or a Microsoft Account. For all of those you change your primary address, and the email address for you changes on all of your contacts.

about two weeks ago
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Steve Ballmer Authored the Windows 3.1 Ctrl-Alt-Del Screen

jader3rd Re:Hexidecimal (169 comments)

Did he also decide to produce the Hex output that is entirely useless and without merit? I understand that's for debugging purposes, but who decided that was a good idea to leave in for a consumer-level OS? Seriously.

How is it a bad idea to present the information in a consumer-level OS? What would be better, not showing information?

about two weeks ago
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The Argument For a Hypersonic Missile Testing Ban

jader3rd Re:Salient Argument provided (322 comments)

Why are we modding up "I don't understand conservation of energy"? The only kinetic energy weapon that could sort of replace nuclear bombs would be bombardment with large asteroids, which no one currently has the capability to do and if they did would take ages to arrive. The kinetic rods would make great orbital armor or bunker piercing weapons, but there's no way they'll replace nuclear weapons.

I think it is getting modded up because they're an option now. 50 years ago certain targets were only really attainable via nuclear strikes. But now we have some really strong conventional weapons that don't replace a nuclear weapon in absolute magnitude, but they are strong enough to take out the target, and not leave you with the ethical dilemma of using a nuclear weapon.

about two weeks ago
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The Argument For a Hypersonic Missile Testing Ban

jader3rd Re:Good timing for this suggestion NOT! (322 comments)

Putin can and will rattle his Nuclear saber but he won't use it until the utmost end of need so at the moment those are empty threats.

[Citation Needed]

about two weeks ago
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China Gives Microsoft 20 Days To Respond To Competition Probe

jader3rd Re:And well they should. (79 comments)

I don't know. I do know that governments have, in the past, only accepted MS formats, and that even MS doesn't have perfect compatibility, which means that if you don't want to deal with the complications of compatibility, you are forced to have at least one machine in the office with MS Office.

If that's really the concern here, should China be conducting a probe against itself, not Microsoft?

about two weeks ago
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China Gives Microsoft 20 Days To Respond To Competition Probe

jader3rd Re:And well they should. (79 comments)

If the government using MSOffice and you have to send and receive documents from the government, the government effectively forces you to use proprietary software.

Does the Chinese government force people to send documents in a proprietary format for which is there is no free software that can create that format?

about two weeks ago
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China Gives Microsoft 20 Days To Respond To Competition Probe

jader3rd What laws? (79 comments)

So which laws are being violated? Did China give Microsoft a specific list of complaints, and if so what are those complaints?

about two weeks ago
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China Gives Microsoft 20 Days To Respond To Competition Probe

jader3rd Re:And well they should. (79 comments)

No government should be forcing its citizens into proprietary software which writes its data in proprietary ways without good, permanent ways to retrieve that data in the far future. Formats like OpenDoc are fully documented and open to public scrutiny. Not to mention the costs and risks of dealing with licensing; working with software that has no source code available.

If China wasn't conducting this probe, how would China be 'forcing' its citizens to use proprietary software? How is this probe removing the forcing of the use of proprietary software?

about two weeks ago
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Microsoft Defies Court Order, Will Not Give Emails To US Government

jader3rd Re:Globalization (419 comments)

I'm suspecting the zeal MS is showing in challenging the US gov't has more to do with laying the groundword of "nation-states" being neutered. This is about power in the future. If they win against the US gov't this is just one more nail in the coffin of the battle to make governments useless. This goes hand in hand with the Trans Pacific and other trade agreements. These things are designed to strip power from government.

This is just one more step in the march of capitalism that will likely destroy civilization in the long run.

Do you think it'll happen by 2077?

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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Microsoft and Ubisoft team up for Assassin's Creed demo that runs in the browser

jader3rd jader3rd writes  |  about 4 months ago

jader3rd (2222716) writes "Neowin reports:

Now, if you are a gaming fan, the collaboration Microsoft has worked on with Ubisoft might be the best yet. The two companies are bringing Assassin's Creed's Pirates demo to the browser. Besides the technical ability of showcasing a demo like this in your browser without having to download the game, Microsoft and Ubisoft are showing how you can begin to rethink the browser as an entirely new platform, and not simply a content navigation tool.

Compared to the previous iterations of these Microsoft demonstrations of IE’s capabilities, this one seems to bridge new boundaries with the gaming community. While Cut the Rope certainly dabbles towards the gaming genre, Assassin’s Creed type games are squarely aimed at the hardcore gaming community. While it may be a bit of a stretch, it’s typically this same crowd that loves to say that “IE is only good for downloading other browsers”, so this could be an olive branch offering to help convince the crowd that IE no longer is the crappy browser because of the IE6 legacy.

"

Link to Original Source
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Iwata isn't Nintendo's problem. It's Miyamoto

jader3rd jader3rd writes  |  about 8 months ago

jader3rd (2222716) writes ""Satoru Iwata's job is on the line. You can tell that it is, because he's been forced to say that he's hanging on to it."
"But perhaps — to think the unthinkable — there is another famous figurehead at Nintendo who is holding the company back; a man regarded for decades as its most valuable asset. I'm talking about the legendary game designer, the creator of Mario, and general manager of the famed EAD development teams: Shigeru Miyamoto. Lately, he hasn't been doing his job so well."

"...consider this: every one of the brilliant games Nintendo released in 2013, it had made before in some form. 3D World might be a dazzling procession of little gameplay ideas, but big ideas have been noticeably absent from the company's output for years now — completely so on both 3DS and Wii U. Its slate is a catalogue of sequels and rehashes. Nintendo's last major new IP launch was Wii Sports, back in 2006.""
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Intrade shutdown hurts academics

jader3rd jader3rd writes  |  about a year and a half ago

jader3rd writes "Intrade, a popular Irish website that lets people bet on anything, has shutdown. In addition to be used by gamblers Intrade has been used by academics and pundits to track public sentiment. "... broad crowds have a lot of information and that markets are an effective way of aggregating that information,” says Justin Wolfers, “and they often turn out to be much better than experts.”"
Link to Original Source
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Your PC Just Crashed? Dont Blame Microsoft

jader3rd jader3rd writes  |  about 2 years ago

jader3rd writes "Wired writes Your PC Just Crashed? Don’t Blame Microsoft
"Chipmakers work hard to make sure their products are tested and working properly before they ship, but they don’t like to talk about the fact that it can be a struggle to keep the chips working accurately over time. Since the late 1970s, the industry has known that obscure hardware problems could cause bits to flip inside microprocessor transistors. As transistors have shrunk in size, it’s become even easier for stray particles to bash into them and flip their state. Industry insiders call this the “soft error” problem, and it’s something that’s going to become more pronounced as we move to smaller and smaller transistors where even a single particle can do much more damage.""

Link to Original Source
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Lipitor makes way for generics

jader3rd jader3rd writes  |  more than 2 years ago

jader3rd (2222716) writes "Lipitor was supposed to go off patent in March of 2010. That was extended to July of this year. Now it's Thursday, Dec. 1 — for real, this time. But what took so long?

In 2008 — three years before Lipitor was scheduled to go off patent — Pfizer made a deal with its generic challenger, the Indian company Ranbaxy. Deal was this: Pfizer would keep selling brand Lipitor for an extra five months, until December instead of July. Pfizer would essentially pay Ranbaxy to hold off. Telling them — 'don't be king just yet. We'll make it worth your while.'"

Link to Original Source
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EPA Partners with Federal Agencies to Track Japan

jader3rd jader3rd writes  |  more than 2 years ago

jader3rd writes "In March 2011 the Japanese tsunami released debris estimated to be in the millions of tons into the Pacific Ocean. University of Hawaii scientists have developed computer models that predict debris from the tsunami could potentially reach Hawaii by March 2012 and the U.S. West Coast by March 2013."
Link to Original Source
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How Carriers Hamstring Your Smart Phone

jader3rd jader3rd writes  |  about 3 years ago

jader3rd (2222716) writes "By recruiting almost 400 volunteers to run an app on their phones that probes a carrier's networks, the team discovered, for example, that one of the four major U.S. carriers is slowing its network performance by up to 50 percent. They also found carrier policies that drained users' phone batteries at an accelerated rate, and security vulnerabilities that could leave devices open to complete takeover by hackers."
Link to Original Source

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