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Comments

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Russia Posts $110,000 Bounty For Cracking Tor's Privacy

jbmartin6 USA beat them to it (96 comments)

Well, the US government is already doing this so the Russkies are behind again.

2 days ago
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Siberian Discovery Suggests Almost All Dinosaurs Were Feathered

jbmartin6 Re:Wow, amazing... (138 comments)

I think he means plate tectonics, as in the land mass that would be Siberia was a lot further south at that point.

2 days ago
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Man Booted From Southwest Flight and Threatened With Arrest After Critical Tweet

jbmartin6 Re:Is there an SWA Twitter police? (865 comments)

Not changing the boarding order was a judgement call. Threatening to call the police over a critical tweet wasn't a judgement call, that was execrable behavior and the person making that decision should be fired.

3 days ago
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Western US States Using Up Ground Water At an Alarming Rate

jbmartin6 getting worse (369 comments)

And now all the pot farming is going to make it even worse.

3 days ago
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Social Security Administration Joins Other Agencies With $300M "IT Boondoggle"

jbmartin6 Re:There should be 1 federal IT agency (141 comments)

I don't see how yet another huge unaccountable Federal agency is going to resolve the problem.

3 days ago
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The Department of Homeland Security Needs Its Own Edward Snowden

jbmartin6 Re:Dismantle DHS (190 comments)

A BHO is essentially the same thing as an extension, that is just what Microsoft calls it.

4 days ago
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The Department of Homeland Security Needs Its Own Edward Snowden

jbmartin6 Re:i bet (190 comments)

Frank Herbert wrote in a few of his sf novels about a Bureau of Sabotage that did essentially that, gumming up the efforts of other government agencies

4 days ago
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Activist Group Sues US Border Agency Over New, Vast Intelligence System

jbmartin6 Re:Privacy while crossing the boarder? (82 comments)

If you cross your boarders they may not pay the rent, then where will you be?

about a week ago
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Japan To Offer $20,000 Subsidy For Fuel-Cell Cars

jbmartin6 Re:Why isn't the U.S. doing things like this? (156 comments)

Or if you like, Coke v. Pepsi is not a good analogy because those products are substitutes for each other. A hydrogen fuel cell car is not a substitute for a gas car, people will not simply switch from one to the other due to price concerns. There are a lot of other factors, such as availability of fueling stations, proximity to qualified service providers, and so on. So the people who will buy the fuel cell car are going to buy one regardless. all this handout will do is add the $20k to the price for the manufacturer to profit. Now if the supporting infrastructure for both types of cars were identical, the analogy might be more apt. But in that case there would be no supposed need for the handout would there? Perhaps the money might be better spent building out fuel stations instead of just effectively handing it out to a politically favored car manufacturer.

about a week ago
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Japan To Offer $20,000 Subsidy For Fuel-Cell Cars

jbmartin6 Re:Why isn't the U.S. doing things like this? (156 comments)

An excellent point. But what do you think the business will do when someone else is handing out money to buy their new product? At the very least, any incentive they have to control costs or reduce prices just went out the window. The Coke analogy isn't quite right since that price is long established by market competition, and coupons are typically backed by the manufacturer or the reseller, i.e. someone in the sales chain, as opposed to some third party whose only involvement is handing out money. In other words, the coupon is in business terms indistinguishable from a price cut. Whereas the $20k handout is simply more profit to be made from customers who would have bought it for $50k but can now 'afford' to pay $70k

about a week ago
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Japan To Offer $20,000 Subsidy For Fuel-Cell Cars

jbmartin6 Re:Why isn't the U.S. doing things like this? (156 comments)

Why not? Because if you hand out $20,000 to buy a car, you just increase the price of every car by $20,000. It is basic economics. We can see the same effect in housing prices, health care, and college tuition.

about a week ago
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FTC To Trap Robocallers With Open Source Software

jbmartin6 Re:Really? (125 comments)

In the land line days you could get a dongle that did exactly that, played a recording that said 'Press 5 to proceed', and just stuck it inline with your phone. I wonder how hard it would be to get a smartphone to do the same thing?

about two weeks ago
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FTC To Trap Robocallers With Open Source Software

jbmartin6 Just Another Layer of TCP (125 comments)

It used to be the "handshake" on phones was: Hello (SYN) Hello (SYN/ACK) What's up? (ACK). Now, thanks to human nature it is: Leave message and call back number = SYN, Call back and leave message (SYN/ACK), return call again and person answers since number is known (ACK). I understand this isn't always possible thanks to business needs and circumstance, but most people I know will simply never answer an unknown number on their phones, instead they let the caller leave a message to determine who the number really is. Any legitimate call will leave a message (and a few non-legits) and all the others can go to hell.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: How Many Employees Does Microsoft Really Need?

jbmartin6 Re:How many employees does Slashdot need? (272 comments)

A good point about the WARN act and similar statutes. I do not agree that my point was backwards, though, in fact you made my point for me. The WARN act and its sisters are a much safer situation since it is well defined. If the company lays off people in dribs and drabs, they are leaving themselves open to all sorts of wrongful dismissal and discrimination lawsuits case by case. I understand the "at will" employee, but by no means is any company free to fire anyone at anytime without cause. I've seen plenty of cases where someone was fired with a whole heck of a lot of cause and the fired person STILL sued. They must have known there was a huge pile of documentation. Anyway, that is one of the barriers to simply firing people piecemeal since you need to document everything six ways from Sunday to defend against the lawsuits. If you are making a global decision to lay off some percentage, it is a lot easier.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: How Many Employees Does Microsoft Really Need?

jbmartin6 Re:How many employees does Slashdot need? (272 comments)

It makes it a lot safer. "We laid off 18k and you were one of them" is more defensible from lawsuits than having to individually justify 18k layoffs.

about two weeks ago
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Russia Prepares For Internet War Over Malaysian Jet

jbmartin6 Re:It is the fault of.. (503 comments)

Not really. Look at the vicious atrocities of the Mongols. They were hardly what we would call nationalistic. Sadly, it is human nature that devalues the Other and makes it possible to rationalize anything.

about two weeks ago
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The Hacking of NASDAQ

jbmartin6 More hysteria (76 comments)

If you review the details, the attackers were on one specific non-trading application owned by Nasdaq and had some access to their internal network. There is no evidence that they had any access to the exchange's systems, which are on a segregated network. In other words "the exchange" was not hacked at all.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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Here comes the Panopticon: Insurance Companies

jbmartin6 jbmartin6 writes  |  about three weeks ago

jbmartin6 (1232050) writes "The Panopticon may be coming, but perhaps not how we think. Instead of a massive government surveillance program, we might end up subjected to ubiquitous monitoring to save on our insurance premiums. The "internet of things (you can't get away from)" makes this more and more possible. Here a company saved money on its health insurance premiums by distributing Fitbits and an online service to enable reporting fitness gains back to the insurance company. We've already seen the stories on using black boxes to monitor drivers. There is even an insurance company named Panoptic! Heck why not a premium hike for owners of this or that "aggressiveness gene"? What if in the future we got a quick "+50 cents" tweet for every scoop of iced cream? I suppose the natural stopping point might be the balance between an individual's willingness to be monitored and the desire to reduce insurance premiums."

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