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Comments

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Fork of Systemd Leads To Lightweight Uselessd

jbolden Re:kill -1 (447 comments)

Cloud computers are not servers in the classic sense they are nodes. The entire cloud or at least huge chunks of it plays the role of a server. For example in a server storage is per machine in the cloud you have many boxes dedicated to managing storage. In a server you have tiny applications acting as message brokers like the TCP/IP stack. In a cloud you have whole machines acting as message brokers.

7 hours ago
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Fork of Systemd Leads To Lightweight Uselessd

jbolden Re:kill -1 (447 comments)

In the case of X11 there is way too much cruft and things implemented for the wrong standards, backwards compatibility. In the case of init the cruft is scattered over hundreds of daemons all offering services. That's what's being gotten rid of.

7 hours ago
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Fork of Systemd Leads To Lightweight Uselessd

jbolden Re:kill -1 (447 comments)

I don't know Poettering. I just want a daemon monitoring standard now.

7 hours ago
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Fork of Systemd Leads To Lightweight Uselessd

jbolden Re:Boycott (447 comments)

I'm a bit iffy in calling that a major distribution, 20 years ago absolutely, today? Also they long ago lost support for most of the applications that make use of systemd (so far enterprise applications and Gnome). But OK. They going with a classic approach on this like many other things.

yesterday
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Proposed Law Would Limit US Search Warrants For Data Stored Abroad

jbolden Re:Black letter law (121 comments)

Why didn't the USA just change their constitution to allow for real trials? Allowing for a medieval type of trial just because one country happens to have a dated phrase in its constitution hardly strikes me as a good solution.

Wow. Trial by jury has tremendous support in the USA, I'd assume something like 98+%. Even people who supported torture and military tribunals for terrorism suspects supported their right to have a jury as part of the military tribunal. If you want the right to trial by jury to be eliminated that's a much more serious debate where a deeply held belief would need to change. There is nowhere near the level of support for an international court as their is for trial by jury.

However, the point is not whether it makes a difference or not, but that the US government is trying to get Microsoft to break the law.

GP was arguing it did make a difference that there was a real danger. If you think he's wrong and this is a question of principle with no practical threat then fine. But then your argument is with him not me.

Indeed. The difference is that the American government seeks to apply its laws and rules everywhere in the world, while other governments typically keep it to their own country.

I gave you an example already, the ICC. Another example is the restriction on Google. Or for that matter this very case, the attempt to impose restrictions on Azure.

yesterday
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Fork of Systemd Leads To Lightweight Uselessd

jbolden Re:Finally someone decides to do something (447 comments)

I agree. I think 80% of what people wanted from systemd is in OpenRC with 0% of the risk. Had init changed some to add most of the functionality people want in systemd, systemd wouldn't have evolved. But it did and now we should be dealing with the world as it exists.

If someone wants something that is equally problematic today were individual solutions are evolving, we need a networking stack that has a better understanding of latency. Now is the time for the old school Unix guys to be fixing that, before the pot boils over.

The architecture doesn't matter too much. Systemd itself will be easily replaceable. For example FreeBSD is porting Apple's launchd over (openlaunchd). Given that systemd is based on launchd and that the FreeBSD people are going to want to run Gnome... I suspect that by 2020 or so openlaunchd would be an alternative, and likely one without the architectural issues.

yesterday
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Fork of Systemd Leads To Lightweight Uselessd

jbolden Re:kill -1 (447 comments)

You've heard time and time again why the foundation needs to be ripped up.

Init doesn't offer the range of services that modern daemon maintenance need nor does it offer a foundation for it. Thus modern daemons end up repeating boilerplate to add functionality that should be available in the init system to themselves. The Unix philosophy is "do one thing and do it well". Not meeting the needs of the direct users (daemons) means init no longer is "doing it well".

yesterday
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Fork of Systemd Leads To Lightweight Uselessd

jbolden Re:kill -1 (447 comments)

Linux's primary market share is on servers.

  Actually at this point Linux's primary market share is on embedded. After that nodes for cloud computing. Then Android (approaching 10b). Then probably individual servers of the type you are thinking of.

In practice, there should be different distribution based on the server and desktop.

There are. But both the server oriented distributions like RedHat and Debian and the desktop oriented distributions like Ubuntu and Mageia are going in this direction. If it were a desktop only feature that's not the move you would expect.

yesterday
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Fork of Systemd Leads To Lightweight Uselessd

jbolden Re:kill -1 (447 comments)

There is a solution for that: containerization and virtualization. The end user for actual physical hardware should be the IT infrastructure management software not human end users. Genuine end users should't care about individual piece of hardware in 2014.

yesterday
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Fork of Systemd Leads To Lightweight Uselessd

jbolden Re:kill -1 (447 comments)

How is systemd proprietary? And how would it be difficult to replace systemd with another full featured init system a decade or two from now if that became desirable? Your comment doesn't make sense.

There is no issue. You can object to having the init system become complex but having the init system become complex doesn't make it proprietary it makes it complex.

Similarly init systems aren't designed by different developers. They are just going to use the norms in place.

yesterday
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Fork of Systemd Leads To Lightweight Uselessd

jbolden Re:kill -1 (447 comments)

I agree this is the same debate we are having on Wayland. The Unix luddite crowd hears about deep structural problems for years, then finally there is a fix and then they start objecting. If something like Gentoo's OpenRC, which is much more an init version 2, had been in place a decade ago systemd might never have evolved. But the people who are objecting to systemd fundamentally just like init and that's not an acceptable option.

yesterday
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Fork of Systemd Leads To Lightweight Uselessd

jbolden Boycott (447 comments)

The only major distribution that doesn't use systemd is Gentoo and that's because they have their own very interesting init replacement. There is no boycott. There are objections to a decision that's been made by some isolated individuals who object.

yesterday
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Proposed Law Would Limit US Search Warrants For Data Stored Abroad

jbolden Re:Black letter law (121 comments)

should read "addresses concerns of non-US populations"...about the ability of the US Government to pry into the private affairs of non-US citizens.

Well certainly they have some concerns about that. But mostly if you aren't a US citizen and don't have heavy involvement with the USA what difference does it make if your data gets transferred to a criminal court? They are just going to toss it.

Not that the US Government gives a flying fuck about the views of non-US citizens. If the US Government finally starts to behave decently and respect the views of non-US citizens (even for the most bogus of corporate-funded reasons), it's a start...

Your governments don't care about American people's opinion either. Governments answer to their own domestic population.

Mostly European governments have been unwilling to negotiate with the American government in good faith. For example In 2001 the Europe was pushing for the creation of an international criminal court. The USA agreed but constitutionally it would require the right to trial by jury. Europe refused to offer that concession which made the treaty completely unconstitutional and thus permanently shattered the ability for their to be a global justice system. And to what end? Your politics is simply too messy and too conflicted. I think you should look to the problems you can do something about.

yesterday
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Proposed Law Would Limit US Search Warrants For Data Stored Abroad

jbolden Re:How about (121 comments)

If you don't want warrants then you are arguing for a vast increase in privacy beyond what ever existed for paper documents. That's not "taking into consideration the modern world" that's fundamentally eliminating the ability of the police to enforce the collection of evidence from private persons. The signers of the constitution would have understood your position, they just would have disagreed.

yesterday
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Proposed Law Would Limit US Search Warrants For Data Stored Abroad

jbolden Re:Black letter law (121 comments)

That act instructs countries to pass laws which meet its directives. It isn't itself law.

yesterday
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'Reactive' Development Turns 2.0

jbolden Re:Methodologies are like religion (101 comments)

That's one of the things you get rid of. You don't have variables in a global sense, there is no mutable global data. Functions have arguments and those are local variables but that's more like a definition there are no state changes permitted in the bulk of your code.

If you need to change the variable type you create a monad. The key to a Monad is it lifts a variable. So for example if you want to have error code as a return type on function that before couldn't error you use the Either Monad.

So say for example f takes 2 Integers and a string and returns a float.
The Mf (the monad version) takes either 2 integers and a string or it takes a error code. It returns either a float or an error code. The lift from f to Mf happens automagically there is only a few lines of code.

2 days ago
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'Reactive' Development Turns 2.0

jbolden Re:Methodologies are like religion (101 comments)

On the surface it seems easier, because things happen automatically, without having to be explicitely defined. The part I'm struggling with is how to keep the code clean and readable with all this stuff happening automatically.

Design your code so that order of execution isn't assumed. This is a functional programming idea, and while functional may not be right for your applications this is an easier concept to see in its native environment. I.E. learn Haskell even if you use something else for your code.

2 days ago
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Proposed Law Would Limit US Search Warrants For Data Stored Abroad

jbolden Re:Reciprocity (121 comments)

Say I do something which isn't a crime, yet an overzealous person drags me to court for it.

Let me clarify an assumption.
A crime is a violation of criminal law punishable by fine paid to the state or imprisonment.
A tort is an act for which a court may require you to pay compensation to another party. These are governed by civil law.

An overzealous person can't drag you to court for a crime at all. Only a prosecutor, which is an elected office can force you to face trial for a criminal act. If there was no law against something you were doing at the time you did the supposed criminal act that's a defense which would get the case dismissed from criminal court.

Now if civil law is trickier. In general though the courts look highly unfavorably on ex post facto application of civil law. But is isn't strictly forbidden. There can be retroactivity application of civil claims.

In the Microsoft case this is all criminal (yet again Microsoft is a witness they aren't on trial) so no ex post facto laws. But remember that Microsoft is engage in acts in the present. So for example the law could change tomorrow to make it a felony for Microsoft not to hand over the documents and then if they didn't do it on Tuesday on Wednesday they could be indicted.

2 days ago

Submissions

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Screen shots and light review of Microsoft Office 15 early beta

jbolden jbolden writes  |  more than 2 years ago

jbolden writes "Winsupersite has recently published a light review of the upcoming version of Microsoft Office Microsoft Office 15 Preview. The new Office a new Metro look and feel with more traditional elements showing the transition towards the Windows 8 paradigm. There is a button which resizes screen elements to make the interface touch acceptable. The mechanics of the ribbon interface have changed, though some of the menus are still too small to be usable with finger / touch. Skydrive is fully integrated into the save menu."
Link to Original Source
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Time for another round of Fink vs. Macports

jbolden jbolden writes  |  more than 3 years ago

jbolden (176878) writes "Its been a while since /. has had a discussion of Fink vs. Macports vs. other alternatives like Homebrew. I wanted to just have an open discussion on people's thoughts."
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FCC considering free internet for USA

jbolden jbolden writes  |  more than 5 years ago

jbolden (176878) writes "According to the Wall Street Journal the FCC is considering a plan to provide free wireless internet. The plan would involve some level of filtering but might allow adults to opt out. CTIA has argued that this business model has traditionally failed (see Slate magazine analysis as to why). Hearing are coming up soon, so /. seems like a good place to start a conversation on where the tech community is on this issue."

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