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Malware vs. Anti-Malware, 20 Years Into The Fray

jcatcw Re:Robert Morris, OMG (62 comments)

"You're thinking of the ..." Aren't you nice! Thinking you say. Apparently not.

more than 6 years ago

Submissions

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Why TCP/IP is on the way out

jcatcw jcatcw writes  |  about a month ago

jcatcw (1000875) writes "Researchers at Aalborg University in Denmark, in association with MIT and Caltech, reckon that the Internet can be made faster, and more secure, by abandoning the whole concept of packets and error correction. Error correction slows down traffic because the chunks of data, in many cases, have to be sent more than once.
The researchers are using a mathematical equation instead. The formula figures out which parts of the data didn't make the hop. They say it works in lieu of the packet-resend."

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Researchers show how easy it is to manipulate online opinions

jcatcw jcatcw writes  |  about a year ago

jcatcw (1000875) writes "A recent study shows that a single random up-vote, randomly chosen, created a herding behavior in ratings that resulted in a 25% increase in the ratings but the negative manipulation had no effect. An intuitive explanation for this asymmetry is that we tend to go along with the positive opinions of others, but we tend to be skeptical of the negative opinions of others, and so we go in and correct what we think is an injustice. The third major result was that these effects varied by topic. So in business and society, culture, politics, we found substantial susceptibility to positive herding, whereas in general news, economics, IT, we found no such herding effects in the positive or negative direction."
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Russia follows in footsteps of SOPA with unsettling new anti-piracy laws

jcatcw jcatcw writes  |  1 year,29 days

jcatcw (1000875) writes "In a controversial move by the Kremlin, Russia has followed in the footsteps of SOPA by hurriedly passing two new anti-piracy bills. The first bill is an extrajudicial blacklist for websites, meaning that any website containing content deemed to be 'unsuitable' or harmful can be shut down without the need for court judgment or investigation. The main problem with the blacklisting method is that IP addresses are targeted instead of specific URLs. The second is a radical anti-piracy law but it is targeting the middlemen as opposed to the pirates themselves. The wider implication of these laws is that they can be used to effectively limit and in some cases even remove altogether the opportunity for alternative viewpoints through the censorship of independent media"
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Feminism explained to computer scientists (Video)

jcatcw jcatcw writes  |  about a year ago

jcatcw (1000875) writes "Gender inequality is a bug, not a feature, according to Beth Andres-Beck — a full-stack software engineer at TripAdvisor, working in Java, JavaScript, HTML5, and Objective-C. Using the analytical tools from her feminist education, Andres-Beck provides some very practical advice to women in technology who are tired of being belittled, hit on at conferences, and otherwise treated poorly in an industry that should be embracing all who are good at generating new technological solutions."
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1 Billion at Risk from Java Vulnerability

jcatcw jcatcw writes  |  about 2 years ago

jcatcw writes "Just as Oracle is ramping up for the September 30 start of JavaOne 2012 in San Francisco, researchers from the Polish firm Security Explorations disclosed yet another critical Java vulnerability that might "spoil the taste of Larry Ellison's morning ... Java." According to Security Explorations researcher Adam Gowdiak, who sent the email to the Full Disclosure Seclist, this Java exploit affects one billion users of Oracle Java SE software, Java 5, 6 and 7. It could be exploited by apps on Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, Opera and Safari. Wow, thanks a lot Oracle."
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ToorCamp: Adventures in an American hacker camp

jcatcw jcatcw writes  |  about 2 years ago

jcatcw (1000875) writes "While a tech camping event might sound like an oxymoron, hackers, makers, breakers and shakers assembled at the northwestern tip of the USA for ToorCamp and dispelled the notion that all hackers avoid sunshine and the great outdoors. As you would expect from a hacker conference, there were workshops like the one for lock picking and a plethora of presentations from “hacking computers to brain hacking, from brewing soda to fighting robots, from civil rights to lightning guns.” Then unique aspects of this cool hacker camp get more bizarre . . like the laser that was so bright it required FAA clearance to deploy it, the ShadyTel community 'payphone,' the Temple of Robotron, an RFID implantation station, bike jousting, dancing robots and of course campfires. Need an even stranger adventure that's also in the ToorCon family of hacking conferences? There's the upcoming WorldToor, the first ever hacker conference in Antarctica."
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FEMA trains for zero day attack on US infrastructure by 'The Void' hacktivists

jcatcw jcatcw writes  |  more than 2 years ago

jcatcw (1000875) writes "“A network of hacktivists known as The Void today threatened to unleash, and I’m quoting here, ‘a global day of extreme action against U.S. interests and organizations, both private and government-related’.” From here, the cybersecurity nightmare begins because fictitious hacktivists from The Void have a zero day and have threatened to attack America’s critical infrastructure. Don’t panic. This is a test. This is only a test in a FEMA cybersecurity exercise. The scenario in the National Level Exercise (NLE) comes along with three videos where Jeanne Meserve, a previous real-life CNN Homeland Security reporter, plays a fictional reporter for VNN News Network who starts off with, “Our lead story in business today is a cybersecurity scare of potentially global proportions.”"
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34 reasons we're losing the cyber war

jcatcw jcatcw writes  |  more than 3 years ago

jcatcw (1000875) writes "Did you catch the recent show "Code Wars: America's Cyber Threat" on CNBC? If not, don't bother. Sadly, the show did nothing to educate viewers about Defensive Computing. But why are the bad guys winning? Here, in no particular order, are the top 34 reasons we're losing the war. For example: 1) The game is rigged; 3) There's no Internet User Guide; 6) SSL is a sham; 8) Public Wi-Fi; 14) Programming is still an art and one best done by the fewest possible people; 29) Google."
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Droid Pro vs Droid 2, Droid X, Droid Incredible

jcatcw jcatcw writes  |  more than 3 years ago

jcatcw (1000875) writes "Motorola introduced the new Droid Pro smartphone this week. It's a bit different from the Droids we've come to expect from Motorola. At a glance, the phone looks almost like a cousin of the BlackBerry, thanks to its smaller screen and built-in QWERTY keypad, but it's pretty evenly matched with the Droid 2, Droid X, and Droid Incredible in terms of sheer computing power. Check out the chart for a side-by-side comparison"
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iPhone 4 vs. Android: And the winner is...

jcatcw jcatcw writes  |  more than 4 years ago

jcatcw (1000875) writes "According to JR Raphael, it's Android by a long shot. The new iPhone hardware is a significant improvement and, on the software side, the updated operating system brings about numerous capabilities previously unavailable to iPhone users. However, most of the iPhone's new features feel like incremental upgrades. The HTC EVO 4G, arguably the highest-end Android phone on the market right now, uses a 1GHz processor, has limitless video chatting, full multitasking, significant customization options (and no, the ability to set your own wallpaper doesn't count as significant), system-wide voice-to-text input, and so much more. In the end, this won't be remembered as the year the iPhone got folders or a gyroscope."
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Fixing Internet censorship in schools

jcatcw jcatcw writes  |  more than 4 years ago

jcatcw (1000875) writes "Schools and libraries are hurting students by setting up heavy-handed Web filtering. The problem goes back for years. A filter blocked the Web site of former House Majoirty Leader Richard Armey because it detected the word "dick," according to a 2001 study from the Brennan Center of Justice. The purpose of schools should be to teach students to live in a democratic society, and that means teaching critical thinking and showing students controversial Web sites, says Craig Cunningham, a professor at National-Louis University. He quoted from a National Research Council study, "Swimming pools can be dangerous for children. To protect them, one can install locks ... [or] teach them to swim." Web filtering also leads to inequities in education based on household income. Students from more affluent areas have access to Internet at home and, often, more enlightened parents who can let them access information blocked in schools and libraries. Poorer students without home access don't have those opportunities"
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IT Survey: Pay stagnates, workforce grows restless

jcatcw jcatcw writes  |  more than 4 years ago

jcatcw (1000875) writes "The results of Computerworld's annual poll, this time of 5,861 IT professionals, show that salaries were flat this year, bonuses were way down, and benefits were reduced or eliminated. This year also saw increases in the percentages of respondents reporting canceled projects (35%, compared with 25% last year), training cuts (37% vs. 25%), budget cuts (65% vs. 53%), salary freezes (51% vs. 22%), and hiring freezes (48% vs. 33%). And that's just for the people who remain employed — 44% of respondents reported permanent layoffs at their companies in the 2009 study, up from 28% in 2008. It's no wonder that satisfaction is down, even among those who reported feeling lucky just to have a job. Some are like Jean-Sebastien Picard, IT manager at Polycor, who is determined to stay positive despite a 10% pay cut. "I'm always happy at work, and I think it's our job to maintain a good atmosphere," he says. Others, such as Arthur MacLeod, systems administrator at Service Point USA, see silver linings in staff cuts, such as the opportunity to improve time management skills and increase cross-training. But even for MacLeod, satisfaction is starting to wane. Check how your packet compares with the Interactive Smart Salary Tool 2009. Maybe you should be planning for your next job. After all, some positions may even be opening up with a possible IT exodus looming."
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Mobile phones help fight hunger in Kenya

jcatcw jcatcw writes  |  about 5 years ago

jcatcw (1000875) writes "It was early 2008. Kenya's Kerio Valley was collapsing under the weight of the chaos and violence sparked by the country's contested elections the previous December. Farmers weren't able to grow crops because of the chaos of the uprisings and a lack of rainfall, so food was scarce or nonexistent. Concern Worldwide, a Dublin -based aid organization, started a program using a system developed by Safaricom and Vodafone to deliver cash to needy families in the Kerio Valley. Through its cash aid program, Concern has distributed about $53,000 to 3,000 individuals. In the end, the pilot program demonstrated that transmitting cash aid using mobile phones could work."
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Power grid is found susceptible to cyberattack

jcatcw jcatcw writes  |  more than 5 years ago

jcatcw (1000875) writes "Researchers from IOActive, a Seattle security consultancy, have spent the past year testing Smart Grid devices for security vulnerabilities and have discovered a number of flaws that could allow hackers to access the network and cut power, according to Joshua Pennell, IOActive's CEO. Smart Grid devices are small computers that are connected to the power grid, giving customers and power companies better control over the electricity they use. There are about 2 million of these devices currently deployed, but many more are expected to be added in coming years."
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Mule skinners need background checks

jcatcw jcatcw writes  |  more than 5 years ago

jcatcw (1000875) writes "Mule skinners — "seasonal workers who dress in colonial garb at a historical park in Easton, Pa." and use mule-drawn boats on a canal — need to get Coast Guard credentials to operate the boat. That's stupid enough, but the Maritime Transportation Security Act of 2002 requires that anyone holding US Coast Guard credentials "must apply for biometric Transportation Worker Identification Credentials (TWIC)". In the meantime, watch out for mule skinner suicide bombers. If you see a mule strapped with C4, call the cops."
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Google search snafu fixed, explained

jcatcw jcatcw writes  |  more than 5 years ago

jcatcw (1000875) writes "What started as a normal weekend morning for Internet users turned into a paranoid panic when the Google search engine started reporting that every site — and we mean every site — was contaminated with malware. At first, Google stated that the problem came from its use of the StopBadware list of bad sites. In an official StopBadware blog posting, the group stated that. "Google generates its own list of badware URLs, and no data that we generate is supposed to affect the warnings in Google's search listings." So what did happen? According to a statement by Google's Marissa Mayer, VP of Search Products & User Experience, "Very simply, human error.""
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Building a better CAPTCHA

jcatcw jcatcw writes  |  more than 5 years ago

jcatcw (1000875) writes "Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols reports that CAPTCHA cracking isn't that difficult these days. It has even become a business. For example, DeCaptcher.com will solve CAPTCHAs for your spamming needs at a rate of $2 per 1,000 successfully cracked CAPTCHAs. In response, newer systems are in development. Both Carnegie Mellon and Penn State (is there something about the water in PA?) are working on image-based systems. ESP-PIX and SQ-PIX both require the viewer to interpret pictures. Imagination CAPTCHA from Penn has the user find the center of an image. The idea is that humans are better at image recognition that computers, but humans can legitimately disagree on their interpretations and some humans are color blind. Problems remain. For now, sites would be well advised to look at reCAPTCHA — the system that works with Google Books and the Internet Archive to digitize printed texts — which comes with a wide variety of application and programming plug-ins and an open API."
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