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Should Disney Require Its Employees To Be Vaccinated?

jdavidb Re:its a tough subject (653 comments)

We can disagree over the rights of herd immunity, but those who maintain that refusal to vaccinate hurts only the one who refuses, as the OP argued, are just plain ignorant of the facts.

Some of us still see a distinction between hurting someone by taking direct action against them, and hurting someone by not taking an action that would benefit them. It's an impasse and I doubt either side is going to persuade the other, no matter how many times it repeats on slashdot, and no matter how many people do or do not understand herd immunity.

3 days ago
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Should Disney Require Its Employees To Be Vaccinated?

jdavidb Re:its a tough subject (653 comments)

Long and short - employers should be able to discriminate against people who voluntarily refuse vaccinations.

That's a completely libertarian position as well. Taken to a logical conclusion, employers may discriminate against employees and even customers on the basis of vaccination, employees and customers may discriminate against businesses on the basis of vaccination policy. I think businesses choosing to have a vaccination policy may be a great innovation that the free market can bring to bear on this issue.

3 days ago
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Should Disney Require Its Employees To Be Vaccinated?

jdavidb Re:its a tough subject (653 comments)

And every time we come to an impasse because some believe they have the right to obtain the benefits of herd immunity at the expense of the freedom of others, and those who disagree. We will pretty much always disagree on this. It's a perpetual impasse.

3 days ago
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FBI Seeks To Legally Hack You If You're Connected To TOR Or a VPN

jdavidb Re:Wow ... (382 comments)

America, you have a problem, and you are making it the problem of everyone on the planet.

Yes, we do. Please be sure not to equate us with our government, though.

Land of the free and home of the brave? You have to be fucking kidding us.

It's a big not-so-funny joke to us, too. :(

about a week ago
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Star Trek Continues Kickstarter 2.0

jdavidb Re:So how are they (106 comments)

I discovered Star Trek Continues after it was posted on Slashdot a couple of weeks ago. This series is now responsible for jump-starting my children's interest in Star Trek, so I rate it highly! :)

about a week ago
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Obama: Gov't Shouldn't Be Hampered By Encrypted Communications

jdavidb Who is the real enemy? (559 comments)

You want me to go fight the Viet Cong? No Viet Cong ever called me nigger. You want me to kill Afghan and Iraqi Muslims? No Afghani or Iraqi ever spied on my private communications. My enemy is the American government, not "terrorists." You're my opposer when I want freedom. You're my opposer when I want justice. You won't even stand up for me in America for my privacy, and you want me to go somewhere and fight when you won't even stand up for my freedom at home.

about two weeks ago
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Silk Road Trial Defense: Mt. Gox CEO Was the Real Dread Pirate Roberts

jdavidb Re:FUD (119 comments)

Do you also support contract killings? Because he ordered hits on a few people.

The U.S. government that is prosecuting Ross pays for killings every day. Why should they have a monopoly?

about two weeks ago
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Bitcoin Volatility Puts Miners Under Pressure

jdavidb Re:Nothing has been lost! (290 comments)

Bit Coins are actually more real then the US Dollar. Sure we get a paper or coin note stating that this represents so much. But at least bit coin is connected to something in limited supply thus needs to be shared.

I've never understood the logic behind statements like this. There are an infinite possible number of cryptocurrencies. A cryptocurrency is nothing but a mathematical algorithm being run on a lot of computers. By its very nature, it can't be in limited supply. Saying that Bitcoin is valuable because it's scare is like saying that digital music or digital video must be valuable because they're scarce. Any one, at any time, can create his own blockchain and create a Bitcoin clone. After that, all he need to do is persuade other people to adopt his blockchain, and a new standard has been created, with the originator becoming "wealthy". In fact, I suspect that this idea may suddenly occur to the operators of one of the big idled mining centers over the next few months. And before anyone says, "But Bitcoin was first!", let me reply, "Friendster and MySpace".

A Bitcoin is a unit of account in a specific ledger. The number of units of account in that ledger is finite. Additional ledgers can be created, and have been. But the value of units of account in those ledgers is not equal to the value of the unit of account in the Bitcoin ledger.

It's a little bit like comparing seats at a concert. Yes, we can put more seats in the back, but they are not valued the same as seats in other sections. We can create more seats, but we can't create more seats in the front row.

about two weeks ago
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Pope Francis: There Are Limits To Freedom of Expression

jdavidb Re:Pope Francis - fuck your mother (890 comments)

Considering Pope Francis will never allow women priests or stop using the stupid, "Love the sinner, hate the sin" when referring to gays, the AC is correct.

Has Pope Francis been documented to say this somewhere? My understanding is that his position has been described as "Who am I to judge?"

about two weeks ago
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Lawmaker's Facebook Rant Threatens Media For "Unauthorized" Use of His Name

jdavidb Where rights stop and start (136 comments)

This is just the logical extension of believing in "intellectual property" or any other fallacy where one person has a right to control someone else.

about three weeks ago
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Tips For Securing Your Secure Shell

jdavidb Re:new goals (148 comments)

If you're hiding data from the NSA that sounds like you're some kind of criminal terrorist who hates the US

We need to change that perception. Being concerned about privacy from the NSA means that somebody is a good citizen who is concerned about freedom.

about three weeks ago
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Putting Time Out In Time Out: The Science of Discipline

jdavidb Re:Cry it out (323 comments)

If you don't see a point in having 7 children, don't have 7 children.

about a month ago
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An Automated Cat Litter Box With DRM

jdavidb Re:sigh (190 comments)

So exercise your rights as a consumer to research beforehand and not buy it. Or return it. Or modify it, as you have

That's what he did. He exercised his right to modify it, and he exercised his right to tell people what he did.

about a month ago
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Putting Time Out In Time Out: The Science of Discipline

jdavidb Re:Argument from authority (323 comments)

My guess is they mean more sending your kid to sit in their room and supposedly think deep thoughts on whatever they did that led to being stuck in their room and how to act better next time.

Yeah, that never accomplished much for me. And I still had to learn to relax in the face of frustration when I was grown. If I had simply learned that before adulthood, I probably would have had 80% of what I needed to get by productively and healthily.

about a month ago
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Putting Time Out In Time Out: The Science of Discipline

jdavidb Re:Cry it out (323 comments)

Here's where you'll say "NOTHING! They're all perfect Angles!"

I assume you meant "anglos"? Would it surprise you to learn that I'm raising them bilingually and interculturally?

This is me glaring at you incredulously ---**glares at you incredulously**

I think you could benefit from some form of relaxation therapy. It's not always necessary or helpful to vent against lifestyles that you disagree with.

about a month ago
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Putting Time Out In Time Out: The Science of Discipline

jdavidb Re:Cry it out (323 comments)

I have five young kids. There's no way to survive this as a parent if you don't let your kids cry themselves to sleep at times. There simply aren't enough parents and time to go around otherwise. Every child is different, but my five only cried for a long period for about 2 weeks or less. Then it generally reduced to about 30-90 seconds. Over the course of their first year of life, they learn to sleep, in stages. There are regressions associated with certain development stages, but so be it. My family size was average until the last 2-3 generations. Is is abundantly apparent that the reduction in family size provides the luxury of a lot more choices in parenting. That's a positive thing. But because there is so much variety to the human condition, it is illogical to suggest that 'crying it out' is new or terribly sub-optimal.

I have seven children. We almost never had to let a child cry themselves to sleep, but I do suspect that may have to do with our kids' individual wiring and that crying to sleep might be the best solution in other situations. Most of our infant sleep problems were resolved when we realized our kids were much hungrier than experts predicted and started feeding them a lot more! Giving the baby another bottle turned out to be the number one way to get our babies to fall asleep with less fuss. When they get a little older (around 3-4 years) there are occasional times when a temper tantrum goes right into sleep.

about a month ago
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Putting Time Out In Time Out: The Science of Discipline

jdavidb Argument from authority (323 comments)

Say goodbye to timeouts. So long spanking and other ritualized whacks. And cry-it-out sleep routines? Mercifully, they too can be a thing of the past.

I applaud any attempt to bring neuroscience and other scientific insights to bear on childrearing, but I question the idea that somebody who is an expert in one of these sub-issues would also be an expert in the others. Sounds like we are committing the logical fallacy of assuming that because one person is an expert in one field they are an expert in all. Maybe these are all related, but it just seems to me that neuroscience is complex enough that an answer to one of these questions doesn't have a lot of bearing on the answer to others.

I'm a father of seven, and I do a lot of work with my kids that could be called timeout, although I don't know if it fits anyone else's idea of what timeouts are. I make my children follow the same rule I was given for myself from a clinical psychologist: when you are angry or upset, don't say or do anything until you relax, because everything you are thinking of saying or doing is a bad idea. Over time you build up the habit of relaxing in the face of frustration, and when you do your brain stops putting so much energy into angry outbursts and starts putting it into actually solving your problem. Also you are a lot less likely to whack somebody that you want to be friends with for the rest of your life. I have a hard time believing that neuroscience would yield any results that say this is a bad idea for child rearing, but maybe they mean something different by "timeout."

about a month ago
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Time To Remove 'Philosophical' Exemption From Vaccine Requirements?

jdavidb Re:One other 'philosophical' problem (1051 comments)

I'm religious, fundamentalist, and I agree with you.

about a month and a half ago
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Dad Makes His Kid Play Through All Video Game History In Chronological Order

jdavidb Re:I'd love to do that (222 comments)

Oh, man, this guy and I were cut from the same OCD cloth. I know it just looking at his pictures of Atari 2600 game boxes all sorted first by box style and then alphabetized. I used to do that when I was a kid and when I finally get the thing out of storage I'll bet a bunch of the games are alphabetized.

about a month and a half ago
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Dad Makes His Kid Play Through All Video Game History In Chronological Order

jdavidb I'd love to do that (222 comments)

I have seven kids all homeschooled and we love to fire up Mame, and I've kept my Atari 2600 although they haven't gotten to play it yet and I need to bring it out of storage. And I love to have them go through interesting pieces of twentieth century history in chronological order - right now we're watching through old Disney and Warner Brothers cartoons together on Saturday mornings, in order. Next year they are going to watch all six Star Wars films in the order they were released, before we see Episode VII.

BTW, it's kind of adding insult to injury that the Pac-Man screen on that article doesn't match the actual console that is shown. I wonder what the kid thought of various ports of Pac-Man.

about a month and a half ago

Submissions

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Prince of Sealand dies

jdavidb jdavidb writes  |  more than 2 years ago

jdavidb (449077) writes "46 years ago, occupying an abandoned WWII platform off the coast of Britain, Paddy Roy Bates declared independence, naming himself Prince of the Principality of Sealand. Today, Bates has passed away at 91.

Long time Slashdot readers will remember Sealand as the site of HavenCo, an unsuccessful data warehousing company that tried to operate from Sealand outside the reach of larger nations' legal structures. They may also remember plans that the Pirate Bay had at one time to buy Sealand.

Bates had moved to a care home a few years ago, naming his son Michael Regent of Sealand."

Link to Original Source
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jdavidb jdavidb writes  |  more than 7 years ago

jdavidb writes "Eric Faden of Stanford University's Fair Use Project "stole" thousands of tiny clips from dozens of Disney films to create an educational film explaining copyright and fair use. Right out of the mouths of characters from Disney, the chief advocate behind the most recent ex post facto extension of copyright, you can learn how copyright terms have been extended, how important it is for works to pass into the public domain in something resembling a reasonable period of time, and what exceptions are granted by the principle of fair use."
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jdavidb jdavidb writes  |  more than 7 years ago

jdavidb writes "Paul Graham writes today on what hackers should know about investors if they want to build a company that will attract funding.

Because most investors are a different species of people from founders, it's hard to know what they're thinking. If you're a hacker, the last time you had to deal with these guys was in high school. Maybe in college you walked past their fraternity on your way to the lab. But don't underestimate them. They're as expert in their world as you are in yours. What they're good at is reading people, and making deals work to their advantage. Think twice before you try to beat them at that.


If you're a hacker, here's a thought experiment you can run to understand why there are basically no hacker VCs: How would you like a job where you never got to make anything, but instead spent all your time listening to other people pitch (mostly terrible) projects, deciding whether to fund them, and sitting on their boards if you did? That would not be fun for most hackers. Hackers like to make things. This would be like being an administrator.


Investors always say what they really care about is the team. Actually what they care most about is your traffic, then what other investors think, then the team.
"

Journals

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Evolution: monopolistically integrated

jdavidb jdavidb writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Today I'm removing evolution from my Fedora 8 system, because it ate my mail this morning, and I'm switching to Thunderbird.

Remember how livid the world was because Microsoft claimed that Internet Explorer was integrated into the OS and could not be removed, even if you were to remove the icon from the desktop? Well, pot, meet kettle: if I attempt to remove the package evolution-data-server from my system, it attempts to take along with it a whopping 32 other packages, including pidgin (the IM client formerly known as gaim) and gnome itself in the form of crucial pieces of gnome such as gnome-panel and gnome-applets.

Gnome and evolution should immediately be sued and brought to justice for their evil monopolistic practices.

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Those backward Mormons

jdavidb jdavidb writes  |  more than 6 years ago

More proof that you shouldn't believe everything you read:

Austin Children's Shelter workers share their experiences [with the FLDS mothers and children]. "We had read that they had a fear of technology, so we took down our computer lab, and the first night one of the mothers pulled out her iPod and asked where she could dock it," VanOsselar said. "It surprised us because we didn't expect them to be so technology savvy," she said.

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Nearlyfreespeech.net discounts large bandwidth usage

jdavidb jdavidb writes  |  more than 6 years ago

I've mentioned before my preferred hosting provider is http://www.nearlyfreespeech.net/, which by your usage, allowing small traffic websites to exist for basically less than a dollar a year. Now NFS has introduced a plan for higher-usage websites: previously, usage was $1 per Gigabyte of bandwidth used. This is still true for your first gigabyte. However, starting immediately upon completion of one gigabyte, the price starts going down logarithmically. A reloadable page displays in real time your changing bytes-per-penny pricing.

For almost all of my purposes, NFS has been suitable. I could pay a lot more for certain things, but I haven't found it to be worth it at this point in time. I'd rather continue to run my websites for the price of rifling through my couch cushions for spare change.

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Why politics is bitter conflict

jdavidb jdavidb writes  |  more than 7 years ago

According to Walter Williams, it's obvious: it's because we're making decisions for everybody instead of letting people be free. Thus, when one's preferences win out, it's necessarily at the expense of someone else who doesn't share those preferences. Of course they fight, bitterly.

The solution is to get government out of these decisions. Eliminate the political machinery that has the power to control these things, and then people will quit fighting for control of it.

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Do Nuclear Weapons Deter?

jdavidb jdavidb writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Do Nuclear Weapons Deter?

The first part of this article is very interesting, as he proposes a chain of logic that he asserts proves that ownership of nuclear weapons is not actually a deterrent to attacks by enemies. I'm not quite able to wrap my head around the logic, yet, and I'm not sure I agree. But it's an interesting thought, and I think I'll be revisiting it.

Then he gets to the point where he mentions "market anarchism." After that point the reasoning gets really weird, and I'm saying that as a market anarchist, myself. I'm sure it's even weirder to those who aren't. :) Some leftist pacifists might agree with and like his conclusions, though.

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Slashdot 10 Hot Comments feed

jdavidb jdavidb writes  |  more than 7 years ago

I've had the Slashdot 10 hot comments slashbox on my page since the year I started using Slashdot (wow; that would be 2001, I think). Now I've built an RSS feed to pull links to the comments into Google reader.

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"Our" infrastructure is in good shape

jdavidb jdavidb writes  |  more than 7 years ago

I really liked this quote:

The next time I cross a concrete bridge (as they all are in Alabama), I'll feel better than I once did: A bridge collapsed somewhere, and it was such a startling event that everyone is covering it endlessly. The incorrect message everyone else is getting is that the nation's infrastructure is crumbling.

I had a vague feeling along those lines when I first heard this story (and being disconnected from most major media I heard the story nearly 24 hours late and have only heard about one update a day since then), but I couldn't elucidate it.

Source: http://www.mises.org/story/2668

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ad blocking software detected

jdavidb jdavidb writes  |  more than 7 years ago

This page just told me "This page cannot be displayed because ad blocking software has been detected." Cute. I guess I just won't bother reading, then.

Or I'll turn off Javascript, or I'll use wget and/or lynx.

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Biological research, without evolution

jdavidb jdavidb writes  |  more than 7 years ago

As we all learned in this discussion, no biological research can take place without accepting evolution.

Unless you count this family, who have beliefs fairly similar to mine.

One counterexample provided. One false premise refuted.

Of course, the truth is that the other side wasn't using the same definition of "evolution" which was explicitly verbally provided at the beginning of the discussion.

(And, yeah, I'm not classing running somebody's distributed computing client as full-blown "research." I'm just saying it's clear you don't have to accept evolutionary origins in order to understand the progress of biological science.

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Feeds updated

jdavidb jdavidb writes  |  more than 7 years ago

The slashdot comment feeds I provide (also here) have been updated to use https URLs. For subscribers, this means they will get to slashdot through https. Non-subscribers should be transparently redirected to plain old http, at least if my one test through IE where I wasn't logged in is any indication.

Meanwhile, it looks like this means the most recent 24 posts will go through each feed again, as they now have different URLs and thus appear to be new items. Hiccup! :)

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7-7-7

jdavidb jdavidb writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Wow: 7-7-7 already. Seems like just a year ago it was 6-6-6.

Of course, 07-07-07 is really 2007-07-07, so there's no actual significance to it, but at least all the people who don't know the real way to write dates will have one day when they won't confuse each other by writing them different ways.

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Creationism does not imply 100% irrationality

jdavidb jdavidb writes  |  more than 7 years ago

The idea that people "need" to be taught evolutionary origins is nothing but petty bigotry.

The rationale for this mind-control and enslavement is the idea that people who believe in creationism are irrational and therefore incapable of making a positive contribution to the great "we" -- society. I note that this assumes two things: that creationism is irrational (I'll grant that many folks think this is proved, not assumed), and that there is some objective standard of how human lives should be spent contributing to society, some standard which says that a life spent one way is "right" while another way is "wrong," measuring according to some metric that I can't fathom about what's "best" for "all" (for sufficient values of "all" that actually, as far as I can see, actually translate to "some").

So let me give you those two points for the moment. I'm going to tentatively agree that creationism is irrational and that it is important to make sure that everyone is rational so that they can "contribute" to "society" or whatever the heck it is you hope to achieve out of having everyone aware of evolution.

Here's what you're missing: nobody is 100% rational, 100% of the time, on 100% of issues. It's not necessary for everybody to understand every piece of truth in order to function productively.

A lot of smoke is blown about how if kids aren't taught evolution they won't be able to be scientifically productive. Horse manure. It ain't so. You can have wrong ideas about what happened 7000 years ago, or 4.5 billion years ago, and still think quite rationally and scientifically about other things.

There's not a lick of evidence provided for the idea that kids need to be taught evolution in order to grow up capable of making a positive contribution to their society or their country. It's something we're just supposed to accept because men of bigoted faith like Richard Dawkins say so. And I'm not willing to see people enslaved (have their freedom taken away in the form of being forced to submit to compulsory reeducation of ideas their parents quite legally believed) just because Richard Dawkins is a bigot.

When I was in first grade my teachers encouraged other students to make fun of me and shame me because I couldn't crayon within the lines of coloring pages. This was cruel abuse, but I realize now it's symptomatic. School is systematically teaching the values we vote on, and today it's created a society that ridicules and shames people of faith, with the bigoted idea that they are 100% irrational.

Speaking of which, this is why I think a school system that is run by democracy is bound to failure. We could vote to teach everyone evolution, but we could just as well vote to teach them the Flying Spaghetti Monster. We could vote to teach everyone that homosexuality is acceptable, or we could vote to teach that such people should be stoned. If you really want your kids to be educated according to the consensus of scientists, then the absolute last thing that you should want is to have them in an educational institution run by a democracy.

(This is also a large part of why I won't vote. Remember when you're casting your vote next year in November about who is going to be my tyrant and king for the next four years and overrule the free choices of me and my children -- that I will not be making any such choice for you. I would never treat you that way.)

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