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Journalist Sues NSA For Keeping Keith Alexander's Financial History Secret

jeIIomizer Re:If true. If. (108 comments)

How about this: By getting in a car, you implicitly consent to giving up your first amendment rights, and your right to life. An officer murdering you for saying something he doesn't like is therefore 100% constitutional.

The possibilities are fucking endless!

3 hours ago
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Journalist Sues NSA For Keeping Keith Alexander's Financial History Secret

jeIIomizer Re:If true. If. (108 comments)

Driving is a privilege not a right.

I knew one of you morons would show up. Even if it is true that driving is a 'privilege' *that does not mean your constitutional rights are null and void the second you decide to innocuously exercise that privilege!* The fourth amendment still applies, and the government has absolutely no constitutional authority to disregard people's rights just because they want to exercise something the government deems a 'privilege.' This logic is simply insane, and it's killing our freedoms.

It's the same sort of logic that allows for the TSA. "You implicitly consented to having your fundamental and constitutional rights violated by government thugs by trying to get on an airplane, so it's not a constitutional violation!" You're in good company, AC; government thugs all over the world drool when they see people using this awful logic to justify the erosion of people's fundamental liberties.

3 hours ago
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Journalist Sues NSA For Keeping Keith Alexander's Financial History Secret

jeIIomizer Re:If true. If. (108 comments)

Democracy != free country. And yes, there are no truly free countries in the world, but being free is something we should aspire to. The US is, after all, supposed to be 'the land of the free and the home of the brave.' So people here would look less like hypocrites if they stopped supporting rights violations and constitutional violations, whether it be to increase their safety or some other reason.

3 hours ago
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Journalist Sues NSA For Keeping Keith Alexander's Financial History Secret

jeIIomizer Re:Bad summary of two separate issues (108 comments)

Like robbery and murder are "none of the government's business"?

No, violating people's liberties simply because they could be criminals is not the government's business. It's not even constitutional.

Lacking fundamental defects in your understanding of the Constitution and law doesn't make you "authoritarian."

You have a number of fundamental defects in your understanding of the constitution.

No.

Yes. You admitted it yourself, by supporting the TSA. Or is this the phase where you deny that it's even a constitutional/rights violation, and then cite some court decision where the judges altered the constitution with invisible ink and ignored the spirit of the constitution to support their big government agenda?

That darned Constitution and the Constituional offices it created. Who does that "Supreme Court" think it is? Just becuase the Constitution created it ....

So you're saying all of the Supreme Court's interpretations of the constitution are 100% objectively correct? Not even the founders agreed with that paradox ("The Constitution has erected no such single tribunal[...]"). They're no less fallible than anyone else, and not all of their decisions are 9-0. Furthermore, they've even overruled past decisions. I guess reality just changes as they see fit; they're actually gods.

If the Supreme Court interpreted the first amendment as saying that the government has the authority to murder anyone for any reason, then I guess it would be true. Thanks, cold fjord! You're like a superhero coming to save everyone from their ignorance!

3 hours ago
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Journalist Sues NSA For Keeping Keith Alexander's Financial History Secret

jeIIomizer Re:Bad summary of two separate issues (108 comments)

So, will you be the one keeping about 2,000 guns off of planes this year?

No one will, because it's none of the government's business. Unless private companies want to try to secure their planes to prevent that from happening, it's none of your business. Oh, wait; you're an authoritarian, so you think everything is your business, and you will happily sacrifice the constitution and people's liberties in the name of safety, all the while denying that it's even a constitutional and rights violation, and appealing to fallible authority figures to 'prove' that you're objectively correct.

4 hours ago
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Journalist Sues NSA For Keeping Keith Alexander's Financial History Secret

jeIIomizer Re:If true. If. (108 comments)

I wasn't aware that I was opposing useful technology simply because it might take away my job. You do know that's what a Luddite is, right? And you do know that not all uses of technology make sense, correct? Therefore, calling me a Luddite for criticizing a stupid use of Javascript makes absolutely zero sense.

6 hours ago
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Journalist Sues NSA For Keeping Keith Alexander's Financial History Secret

jeIIomizer Re:Bad summary of two separate issues (108 comments)

The TSA does not need to be revamped; it needs to be destroyed. Anything less than complete elimination is unacceptable. Government thugs should not be in airports; the end. Same with the DHS, which should never have been created in the first place.

8 hours ago
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Journalist Sues NSA For Keeping Keith Alexander's Financial History Secret

jeIIomizer Re:If true. If. (108 comments)

Why the hell do I have to enable javascript for that site and whitelist ajax.googleapis in order to see some fucking text? What a poorly-designed website.

9 hours ago
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Journalist Sues NSA For Keeping Keith Alexander's Financial History Secret

jeIIomizer Re:If true. If. (108 comments)

Extremely few on any side of the political spectrum in the US (barring government & MIC) wants an Orwellian surveillance//security/police state.

How many people support DUI checkpoints, free speech zones, unfettered border searches, constitution-free zones, the TSA, the NSA's mass surveillance, protest permits, stop-and-frisk-type policies, unwarranted surveillance in general, or assassination of citizens without trial? They only have to be a supporter of one of them to be a supporter of a police state, and I can't tell you how many people I've personally conversed with that supported a number of those as long as it makes them feel safe. In 'the land of the free and the home of the brave,' freedom should be considered more important than safety, but I don't think most people see it that way.

And even if most people did see it that way, look at how many people changed their tunes directly after 9/11? If people are so weak and unprincipled that a disaster can make them give a bunch of power to the government, then all it takes is another disaster for the government to take advantage of, and we'll lose all that progress.

So either way, I'm not too optimistic.

9 hours ago
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Which Is Better, Adblock Or Adblock Plus?

jeIIomizer Re:Reject all proprietary software and "choice" to (352 comments)

Also, you're incorrect about the TSA. Most people are either apathetic about it or support *some* security there, even if it violates people's rights and the constitution.

11 hours ago
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Which Is Better, Adblock Or Adblock Plus?

jeIIomizer Re:Reject all proprietary software and "choice" to (352 comments)

False equivalency.

Straw man, right off the bat. I was using his own logic against him (That people don't care, so it doesn't matter.) to show how ridiculous it is. That you have a problem with my example shows, I think, that you agree such logic is ridiculous.

Never once did I say that the TSA and choosing proprietary software are 100% similar. So that's your straw man, not mine. Learn what an analogy actually is and then come back to me.

and overwhelmingly people choose proprietary because that is where the innovation is

People choose proprietary software because our government is bought and paid for by corporations to such a degree that proprietary software is used everywhere in schools with little to no mentions of alternatives, and then classes are created that teach people via rote learning how to use specific proprietary software. What happens? People get used to the proprietary operating systems and software, and free software is therefore at a disadvantage.

The educational system is one place where free software should be mandated, and created, if necessary.

because free software is almost always a poor clone of proprietary software, not ahead of the curve, not innovative, just an also-ran me-too product.

Nonsense.

But even if that were true, free software is about morality. There are many things that would benefit me that would nonetheless be completely immoral, much like some proprietary software. The idea that I can't look at or modify the source code, and I'm beholden to some specific source that may be malicious (i.e. working with the government to violate people's privacy, as Snowden has shown), is immoral.

11 hours ago
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Jesse Jackson: Tech Diversity Is Next Civil Rights Step

jeIIomizer Re:Confusing position (396 comments)

"P.S. I did vote for the guy, he seemed way better than the other guy who thought strapping an open dog carrier to the roof of his car was "okay" among other things"

If it was that, well, that was supposed to be a quote.

13 hours ago
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Jesse Jackson: Tech Diversity Is Next Civil Rights Step

jeIIomizer Re:Confusing position (396 comments)

No, I don't vote for either republicans or democrats. What made you think that I do, given what I said?

13 hours ago
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Jesse Jackson: Tech Diversity Is Next Civil Rights Step

jeIIomizer Re:Confusing position (396 comments)

Continuing and even sometimes expanding the egregious violations of the constitution and people's fundamental liberties of the last administration and all his buddies in congress? Check. P.S. I did vote for the guy, he seemed way better than the other guy who thought strapping an open dog carrier to the roof of his car was "okay" among other things

You are the problem. You and your ilk only ensure that candidates from The One Party win time and time again. Both parties are filled with evil scumbags, and voting for either of them is the same as supporting all the various constitutional and rights violations that these people advocate. Voting for 'the lesser of two evils' is simply a self-fulfilling prophecy; third parties won't win because they won't win because assholes like you won't throw away your irrational fear of wasting your vote and just vote for them. They don't even need to win; getting a significant number of votes will send a message to candidates from The One Party.

Regardless of any of that, voting for evil scumbags should make anyone with any sort of principles and a love for freedom want to vomit.

yesterday
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Which Is Better, Adblock Or Adblock Plus?

jeIIomizer Re:Chrome? (352 comments)

Are they? Some minor personal data such as web searches vs some real tangible improvement in my life?

Some people call metadata "minor," too, and yet it easily could have been used to find Paul Revere. You'd be surprised at what they're capable of when using only "minor" data.

The reality is the vast majority of the world is not at all affected by DRM, and that does not make them all addicts.

But fortunately most of the western world is not actually afraid of their government.

And now your mentality has been revealed. Every citizen in every free country should be *cautious* of their governments. Why do you think we place limitations on their powers? Because hundreds of millions of people were abused and/or outright murdered throughout history by these 'trustworthy' fellows in governments, proving that it's foolish to give them too much power.

I'm sure you'd downplay the "metadata" the NSA is collecting too, as if it doesn't matter that they're violating people's rights and the constitution. You simply don't care about privacy, freedom, or anything else, and seek convenience above all else.

No they are not harming people by collecting data. They are only harming people by misusing data.

Fucking bullshit. They're violating the constitution and people's liberties, and that more than qualifies as harm to every person whose data they are collecting.

Your argument sounds like those people who think cameras should be banned in public parks because someone may take a photo of a child and then go home and masturbate to it.

Nope. Public place. The NSA intercepts people's communications, which is a rather different story.

Also, you're an idiot. *You're* the one who said that the collecting of the data is not harm, and it's the abuse of it that harms. I, however, do not require abuse to say that it is harm, so your example is nonsensical to begin with.

The reality is if something does not have an effect on your life then you are not actually being wronged.

The NSA's data collecting *does* have an effect on my life as a citizen in 'the land of the free and the home of the brave.' The constitution is the highest law of the land in the US, and if the government violates it, then that harms every single citizen.

You seem to think that physical harm is the only harm that exists; that's nonsense. You can harm people merely by infringing upon their liberties, whether or not something physical happened (although data collection is physical too).

Someone could be masturbating to a naked photo of me right now but I don't know about it so it isn't effecting me in any way.

And yet if someone installed spy cameras in someone's house and spied on them, they could sue for damages and that person would be put in prison even if the data was never 'misused.' The real misuse is in *collecting* the data.

or did I just miss the sarcasm.

You missed the sarcasm.

yesterday
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Which Is Better, Adblock Or Adblock Plus?

jeIIomizer Re:Chrome? (352 comments)

Yeah, OK dumbass, you know best what other peoples priorities should be.

I know that the TSA needs to be eliminated, that the NSA's spying needs to be stopped, and that it's damn foolish to allow scummy corporations--which often work hand-in-hand with the government--to have access to your data unnecessarily.

That's what it feels like to a goddamn fruitcake who needs to see a shrink.

So if I was saying that 1 + 1 = 2, and everyone else was saying that it's not, I would need a shrink? This is just the bandwagon fallacy.

yesterday
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Which Is Better, Adblock Or Adblock Plus?

jeIIomizer Re:Reject all proprietary software and "choice" to (352 comments)

"But that is exactly the point: did they notice? No. Google play services has been around for a couple of years now and for all the "evil" and "stealing of freedom" of proprietary software the end result is nothing"

What does it matter if they noticed? Unless you have some sort of actual point, you can't really accuse me of using straw men.

yesterday
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Which Is Better, Adblock Or Adblock Plus?

jeIIomizer Re:Chrome? (352 comments)

Because the benefit and ease of use leaking my data brings far outweighs the consequences to me.

As usual, your priorities are misplaced. The same applies to the majority of gamers, who behave like drug addicts; no matter how badly scumbag corporations abuse them with DRM, outright malware (Sony rootkits), walled gardens, etc., they always come crawling back for another fix, even if they claimed they would boycott the companies. They are profoundly ignorant.

The consequence is some company knows some anonymised information about me.

You are assuming that they truly are anonymizing the data. We already know corporations often work close together with the government, or will hand over lots and lots of information on request.

But government or not, anonymous or not, I simply want to keep as much information out of the hands of scummy companies like Google, Microsoft, Apple, etc. as possible.

So far I have yet to be wronged by any of them.

It's possible to be wronged without knowing it. Harm is not always tangible. For instance, the NSA is harming people simply by collecting data.

I don't disable it for the same reason I didn't disable sharing tracking information on my phone despite it being an opt in option when I first turned it on.

Truly, that is a wise decision.

yesterday
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Which Is Better, Adblock Or Adblock Plus?

jeIIomizer Re:Chrome? (352 comments)

So are you 100% google free? No Android, no Google browser, no Gmail?

Yes.

The reason I ask is because when I type something into the Firefox search bar in it's default configuration, shortly after it will appear as a suggested search in Chrome's universal address bar.

Why not simply disable it?

yesterday
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Which Is Better, Adblock Or Adblock Plus?

jeIIomizer Re:Reject all proprietary software and "choice" to (352 comments)

The TSA has been around for a while, too. People don't seem to care about privacy, fundamental liberties, or software freedom. Does that make those things bad or unimportant? No. It just means that people are ignorant.

yesterday

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