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Comments

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Denmark Faces a Tricky Transition To 100 Percent Renewable Energy

jez9999 Re:It is all about baseload (485 comments)

Why don't they build a few more nuclear plants? A higher baseload means you have a higher peakload, and since nuclear is emission-free, it doesn't matter if you're not always using all of its output.

about a week ago
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Marijuana Legalized In Oregon, Alaska, and Washington DC

jez9999 Re:Wonderful (588 comments)

I'm really jealous of you guys in they US. ALl we have in the UK are fucktard politicians obsessed with being "tough on drugs" and throwing as many people behind bars as possible.

Tell you what, as soon as your federal govt. is forced to legalize it, can you invade us and force our govt. too?

about two weeks ago
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France Investigating Mysterious Drone Activity Over 7 Nuclear Power Plant Sites

jez9999 Re:Anti-Nuclear group looking for scare material? (128 comments)

DID YOU KNOW THE AIR ABOVE A NUCLEAR POWERPLANT IS 10,000,000,000,000,00000000 TIMES MORE RADIOACTIVE THEN NORMAL?!?!?! YOU ARE BREATHING THIS IN!!!!!!!!!

Except that they'd be wrong if they said that. They should try flying over a coal power plant.

about three weeks ago
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France Investigating Mysterious Drone Activity Over 7 Nuclear Power Plant Sites

jez9999 Re:Unless the plant is surrounded in a glass dome. (128 comments)

If fukushima taught us anything, it's that you need to cut the power coming in (the plants require mains power from the grid to operate), and disable the generator. Those two things, and nearly all designs of plants will melt down.

Except for ones with passive cooling. Guess which ones we should be building.

about three weeks ago
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The Airplane of the Future May Not Have Windows

jez9999 Re:motion sickness (286 comments)

No it must be the other way around, otherwise FPS computer games couldn't give you motion sickness. You're not moving but your eyes tell you you are.

about three weeks ago
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Hungary To Tax Internet Traffic

jez9999 Real reason (324 comments)

The government's just hungary for money.

about a month ago
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Help ESR Stamp Out CVS and SVN In Our Lifetime

jez9999 Re:I am not going to convert (245 comments)

What are you talking about?

You can easily have a centralized git repo that does regular backups. That's what Bitbucket, Github, etc. do.

about a month ago
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More Eye Candy Coming To Windows 10

jez9999 Re:Aero? (209 comments)

I don't so much mind the flatness as the drive toward black-and-white UI icons. That is a UX "innovation" that needs to die, now. Even today when I fire up an old copy of Visual Studio 2010 I think the interface is so much nicer and richer than the minimalist BS of today.

about a month ago
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In UK, Internet Trolls Could Face Two Years In Jail

jez9999 Re:Chris Grayling is a cunt (489 comments)

Careful, he could jail you for 2 years for that post.

about 1 month ago
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Firefox 33 Arrives With OpenH264 Support

jez9999 Re:No way will I support Firefox ever again (114 comments)

Uh, I don't think a large number of them refused to work under Eich. He had been at the organization for years.

about a month ago
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Password Security: Why the Horse Battery Staple Is Not Correct

jez9999 Re:Every time XKCD 936 is Mentioned (549 comments)

Weirly, I was thinking about that comic entry just a couple of days ago. "It's simple math that shows that Munroe's method is better for creating stronger password" - is it, though? What about dictionary attacks? Attackers could just join 3 or 4 English words together in an attempt to brute force such passwords. This drastically reduces that kind of "passphrase"'s entropy.

about a month ago
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Texas Health Worker Tests Positive For Ebola

jez9999 Re:Sensationalized risk. (421 comments)

2.25 million people a week are injured from car accidents?

about a month ago
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Oxytocin Regulates Sociosexual Behavior In Female Mice

jez9999 Re:If you dare... (216 comments)

Politics.

Women can vote too. Apparently they're voting for men. Or maybe not as many women are willing to put in the time and effort to be high-ranking politicians. Either way I don't see any "power imbalance". Women have equal opportunity.

The only ones of which I am aware are Maternity leave (more common that Paternity leave) and alimony.

Yeah quite. Rather unfair to men, isn't it? Especially alimony, which as I understand it in the US is basically a free monthly payment to a woman when she decides she wants to end the marriage.

about a month ago
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Oxytocin Regulates Sociosexual Behavior In Female Mice

jez9999 Re:If you dare... (216 comments)

For example, I acknowledge there is a power imbalance between women and men, favouring men.

That smells like a crock of shit to me. Please list examples in Western societies today where there is a power imbalance between the genders. Including ones where women are given preferential treatment.

about a month ago
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David Cameron Says Brits Should Be Taught Imperial Measures

jez9999 Re:Pandering (942 comments)

Where did you get the 24,000 figure from??

about a month and a half ago
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David Cameron Says Brits Should Be Taught Imperial Measures

jez9999 Re:Pandering (942 comments)

Actually, I should've said a net increase of 250,000 population through immigration per year. It's actually more like 500,000 immigrants per year.

To put that in perspective, the USA currently seems to get about 1 million immigrants per year. The land mass of England is 130,395 km2. The land mass of the USA is 9,629,091 km2. ~500,000 coming into England every year is like ~37 million immigrants entering the USA every year.

about a month and a half ago
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David Cameron Says Brits Should Be Taught Imperial Measures

jez9999 Re:Pandering (942 comments)

far right rhetoric, nationalism anti-immigrant and anti-EU whargarbl that UKIP is putting out

I'm sorry, but Utter Crap.

The reason many people are voting for UKIP is because they're the only party willing to properly address the issues of the EU and border control. Right now the UK has 250,000 immigrants a year, almost all of which go into England. England is the 2nd most densely populated region of Europe, behind the Netherlands. This is an *insane* level of immigration that is completely unsustainable. To raise this point is not far right or racist or any other such nonsense that has been flung at UKIP.

about a month and a half ago
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David Cameron Says Brits Should Be Taught Imperial Measures

jez9999 Re:FP? (942 comments)

A lot of it also had to do with "sticking it to Nick Clegg". Equally stupid of course. A lot of people here really suck.

about a month and a half ago
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David Cameron Says Brits Should Be Taught Imperial Measures

jez9999 Re:Simple answer (942 comments)

Yeah, the metric martyrs thing was dumb, but bear in mind even UKIP only wanted traders to have the *option* of selling in pounds and ounces. AFAIK they haven't said they want children to be downgraded to retarded imperial measurements in school. If they did they'd probably lose my vote. This seems to be unique Cameron stupidiy.

about a month and a half ago

Submissions

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Ask Slashdot: Is HTTPS snooping becoming more acceptable?

jez9999 jez9999 writes  |  more than 2 years ago

jez9999 writes "I recently worked for a relatively large company that imposed so-called transparent HTTPS proxying on their network. In practice, what this means is that they allow you to use HTTPS through their network, but it must be proxied through their server and their server must be trusted as a root CA. They were using the Cisco IronPort device to do this. The "transparency" seems to come from the fact that they tend to install their root CA into Internet Explorer's certificate store, so IE won't actually warn you that your HTTPS traffic may be being snooped on (nor will any other browser that uses IE's cert store, like Chrome). Is this a reasonable policy? Is it worth leaving a job over? Should it even be legal? It seems to me rather mad to go to huge effort to create a secure channel of communication for important data like online banking, transactions, and passwords, and then to just effectively hand over the keys to your employer. Or am I overreacting?"
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Ask Slashdot: Transparent HTTPS proxying - acceptable or abominable?

jez9999 jez9999 writes  |  more than 2 years ago

jez9999 writes "I recently worked for a relatively large company that imposed so-called transparent HTTPS proxying on their network. In practice, what this means is that they allow you to use HTTPS through their network, but it must be proxied through their server and their server must be trusted as a root CA. They were using the Cisco IronPort device to do this. The "transparency" seems to come from the fact that they tend to install their root CA into Internet Explorer's certificate store, so IE won't actually warn you that your HTTPS traffic may be being snooped on (nor will any other browser that uses IE's cert store, like Chrome). Is this a reasonable policy? Is it worth leaving a job over? Should it even be legal? It seems to me rather mad to go to huge effort to create a secure channel of communication for important data like online banking, transactions, and passwords, and then to just effectively hand over the keys to your employer. Or am I overreacting?"
Link to Original Source
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The ISP that pledges to put your privacy first

jez9999 jez9999 writes  |  more than 2 years ago

jez9999 (618189) writes "Nicholas Merrill is planning to revolutionize online privacy by launching a non-profit ISP that would do everything it could to protect users' privacy via mobile connections, and landline connections from $20 a month.

The ISP would try to challenge any orders from the government for data disclosure that were questionable in court; that is, if they even have the capability to release the private information requested. "The idea that we are working on is to not be capable of complying" with requests from the FBI for stored e-mail and similar demands, Merrill says."

Link to Original Source
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Home automation comes one step closer

jez9999 jez9999 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

jez9999 (618189) writes "When Bill Gates unveiled his $100m networked mansion in the mid-90s, it barely seemed believable that mere plebs of more moderate financial standing might too one day use computers to adjust the ambient temperature of their living rooms and queue Chris Rea on the Jacuzzi stereo when they were driving home from the golf course. We still can't. But we are getting very close, thanks to technology from a company called Intamac, says one Inquirer article."
Link to Original Source
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Scientists show off 'acoustic cloak' blueprint

jez9999 jez9999 writes  |  more than 6 years ago

jez9999 (618189) writes "A Spanish team of scientists have unveiled designs for an 'acoustic cloak'. The technology, outlined in the New Journal of Physics, could be used to build sound-proof homes, advanced concert halls or stealth warships.

The cloak uses so-called "sonic crystals". These artificial composites — also known as "meta-materials" — can be engineered to produce specific acoustical effects.

Noisy neighbours could be a thing of the past, if you have enough money to afford this!"
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Giant trees proposed to clear excess CO2

jez9999 jez9999 writes  |  more than 6 years ago

jez9999 (618189) writes "Wallace Broecker, the scientist who coined the term "global warming" in the 1970s, has proposed a radical solution to the problem of climate change. He advocated millions of "carbon scrubbers" — giant artificial trees to pull CO2 from the air. He did, however, admit that such a project faced an uphill struggle, as the political will to implement it would likely be lacking."
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UK considers harsh punishment of music downloads

jez9999 jez9999 writes  |  more than 6 years ago

jez9999 (618189) writes "The UK government is considering banning people who they detect illegally downloading copyrighted music and movies from using the internet. They would require ISPs to try and detect, and then report, such activity to them.

The system would operate under a 'three strikes' rule, where users are twice warned, and then banned on the third infringement, from accessing the internet."
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UK Professor argues for teaching of creationism

jez9999 jez9999 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

jez9999 (618189) writes "Head of science at London's Institute of Education Professor Michael Reiss argues that there is an educational value in comparing creationist ideas with scientific theories like Darwin's theory of evolution because they demonstrate how science, unlike religious beliefs, can be tested. He said: "The number of Muslim students has grown considerably in the last 10 to 20 years and a higher proportion of Muslim families do not accept evolutionary theory compared with Christian families. "That's one reason why it's more of an issue in [UK] schools." "By not dismissing their beliefs, we can ensure that these students learn what evolutionary theory really says — and give everyone the understanding to respect the views of others," he added."
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UK Lords committee blasts 'e-crime'

jez9999 jez9999 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

jez9999 (618189) writes "A House of Lords report says that the government must do more to protect internet users from the threat of 'e-crime'.

The report claims that the internet is now "the playground of criminals", and that UK internet users are now more scared of internet crime than burglary. It suggests a wide range of security measures that the government should take to increase the confidence of internet users, including making 'software firms' (BBC Radio 5 Live used the term 'ISPs') compensate users for 'e-fraud'."

Link to Original Source
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Bible-based actionfigures set to hit US toy market

jez9999 jez9999 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

jez9999 (618189) writes "From the middle of August, Wal-Mart, the biggest toy retailer in the US, will for the first time stock a full line of faith-based toys. The dolls will go under the brand name, 'Tales of Glory'. The company behind the dolls, One2believe, hope that such figures as Goliath and Samson will help to make their dolls competetive in the notoriously difficult-to-crack US toy market."
Link to Original Source
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jez9999 jez9999 writes  |  more than 8 years ago

jez9999 writes "BBC News reports that the [UK] government has announced plans to make the possession of downloaded violent porn images punishable by three years in prison. It follows a campaign by Berkshire woman Liz Longhurst whose daughter Jane, a Brighton schoolteacher, was killed by Graham Coutts. It's already an offence in the UK to publish or distribute such material. Although violent porn will not appeal to many, nevertheless it is between consenting adults."

Journals

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This is how I've felt about UX 'design' for ages now.

jez9999 jez9999 writes  |  more than 2 years ago

I just had to highlight this post I came across; it pretty much pretty hit the nail on the head with what pisses me off about the whole UX thing:

If I have to guess what to do, the GUI lost its purpose. May as well just go back to DOS

The purpose of the GUI is to keep UX designers employed. The year 24-bit color becomes standard, XP's Fisher-price look is "needed" to make that boring and stodgy NT/2K look go away. The year 3d graphics appears on commodity hardware, Aero is "needed" to make that "childish" XP look go away. The year touchscreens come out, Metro is "needed" to make that "distracting" 3D glossy look go away.

Same sorta deal with Firefox - a few years ago, a browser with lots of options and user control was a good thing. Now it's "distracting" and even the status bar and the name of the communications protocol in the title bar needs to go away to make it "clean".

It's not UX design, it's fashion design. Bunch of artistes wanking away on Photoshop trying to out-trendify each other. It's an utter waste of computing resources, and I'm sick of it.

Exactly. Everyone involved in app development needs to read this and decide whether they want to hire ANYONE who is a self-professed "UX person".

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Why corporations act in evil ways

jez9999 jez9999 writes  |  about 9 years ago

I often wonder why companies, even ones that are already rich, continue to do evil things such as help out the Chinese government with their suppression of their own people. The answer is that, no matter how rich a company/corporation currently is, they always want more money. It's like food to them; if they don't keep getting more in, the shareholders will punish the company's board; it feels, to them, like the company is 'starving'. It's no good for them to just make one big ton of money (Microsoft) and be happy with that - they must keep on getting more, always, for eternity. Food to humans is a good analogy. So, just as humans have to eat to survive, they companies/corporations have to eat (money) to survive, and try to survive they will. They'll even keep on eating if they're fat (have loads of money alredy), just like humans... unfortunately, companies don't even have the desire to slim again, like humans often do. To a company, getting as fat as possible is, and always will be, the ultimate goal - the point of its existance. This explains their neverending lust for profit, despite any consequences.

"To a person, animal flesh is food (vegetarians excepted). To a corporation, money is food, and like people, a corporation will do just about anything to ensure a consistent supply of food (money)."

This excellent summing up was written by user 'mcrbids' - thanks!

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My advice to programmers

jez9999 jez9999 writes  |  more than 10 years ago

If there is one thing I would recommend to all newbie or learning programmers, it's this: before you delve into learning the details of a language or API or whatever, read a quick tutorial or overview first. If I had realised this a long time ago, I would've saved myself a lot of time.

There are several reasons for this.
Firstly, you may not like the language that you've decided to learn. Reading a short tutorial about it will let you see quickly whether you want to go further into investigating the language or not.
Secondly, learning a language by reading something like a reference book is a really good way to make you hate the language. Or get bored too quickly to learn it properly, and give up.
Thirdly, it's not really *necessary* to know *everything* about a language before you start to program in it. I'm sure there are people out there who would disagree with me on that, but as long as you know the fundamentals of a language, I think it's better to start going and learn as you create your first few projects, than to read through a detailed book that will probably be a very dry read if you aren't doing much coding using the stuff you're reading about.

My personal experience has taught me this. Maybe it's just my way of learning, I don't know, but I have had a lot more success learning stuff through first reading short and concise tutorials such as 'Learning Perl' (Schwartz & Christiansen) and 'theForger's Win32 API tutorial' (theForger :-) ), and have more quickly picked up and become proficient in the languages (or whatever) I have used this technique with, than the ones where I have started out trying to learn *everything* about the subject before I used it; for example, I am unable to read through from start to finish and appreciate a book such as, say, 'The C Programming Language' (Kernighan & Ritchie) or 'Programming Windows' (Petzold), yet I have both books sitting on my windowsill. Why?

Well, partly because I accidentally bought several such books with the intention of reading through them non-stop, and then realised partway through that I was getting so bored I wasn't really learning anything. And partly because what I now use them for is *reference* books.

It may sound obvious, but it's quite easy to 'bite off more than you can chew' and try to learn too much before you start with a language or API or whatever. Get into the habit of starting with short and concise tutorials, and reading into certain aspects that you need to know in a more detailed way, when you need to know them. Had I had this advice available to me when I first started to learn programming, I would have saved myself a lot of time and boredom. :-)

I wish all new/learning programmers could be given this advice somehow when they start to learn something new. I'd like to stop others making the same mistakes that I did. I don't often say a lot of long-winded preachy stuff, but this is one of the few things that I've really learnt to be useful, and thought that sharing it would be beneficial to all programmers. So please, if you know any struggling new programmers, no matter what language (or whatever) they're learning, try giving them the gist of this advice! It may well help.

Plus, when recommending books, make two distinct categories of books. Tutorials, and reference books. It's pretty much impossible to have something that is both, and I've frequently had inappropriate reference books recommended to me that haven't done much other than waste my time/money, as they were FAR too detailed when I knew too little about the given subject - it's these kind of recommendations that make me think that this advice, though it may seem obvious, needs to be more widely accepted and adopted. Advanced programmers tend to recommend stuff that would now be appropriate for them to read; not necessarily what would be appropriate for someone new to the subject, or indeed them - when they were new to the subject - to read.

Comments are welcome.

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