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Comments

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Searching the Internet For Evidence of Time Travelers

jfalcon Nikola Tesla (465 comments)

This one is a shoe-in for time traveler. He's like Dr. Emmett Brown stuck in the 1890's...

about 7 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: How To Build a Morse Code Audio Library For Machine Learning?

jfalcon You're doing it all wrong.... (79 comments)

Obviously you realize there are differences in how people send CW. While I applaud your drive to make a smarter decoder - the reality is that you need to make sure it works on live traffic. So in that respect, you should hook it into some kind of SDR software like HRD or even make your own that can decode multiple streams of CW. If you don't have a radio, I suggest maybe a SoftRock receiver?

1. It gives you actual live conversations with all the mistakes and alterations. Not everyone uses computer generated CW. In fact, most brass pounders dislike it because it's boring to listen to and dry to copy.
2. There are sanctioned CW events all the time... QSO parties, commemorative stations and even at the beginning of next month there are straight key nights where people put the paddles away and break out the straight key.
3. I'm going to assume the end goal is to put this listening to live feeds anyways. You should work toward that goal now as then you can write code to compensate for QRM and QRN/fading.

Having people feed you 'tapes' won't accomplish your goal. You need to have it work with the real source.

about 7 months ago
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German Court Rules Against MS FAT Patent

jfalcon Hindsight is 20/20 (1 comments)

Is it obvious before the invention of FAT or after? It's easy to call it obvious after entire generations have lived with it.

about 7 months ago
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EU To Allow 3G and 4G Connections On Planes

jfalcon Re:Only for business (106 comments)

The system is shut down during takeoff and landing. So no, this wouldn't happen normally.

about 8 months ago
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EU To Allow 3G and 4G Connections On Planes

jfalcon Re:The problem is not the FAA, or the FCC... (106 comments)

I wouldn't say that. I'm sure the companies who already provide WiFi services let alone the history of AirFone and other hardware manufacturers have lobbied the US for years. The difference is that the EU use common sense while the FAA are mainly run by luddites stuck in the 1950's.

Think of how long it has taken to get GPS based ILS put in place and approved even tho the practices and technologies have been around for decades.

about 8 months ago
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EU To Allow 3G and 4G Connections On Planes

jfalcon Re:Cost Benefit Analysis Needed... (106 comments)

Satcom is a mostly fixed cost as it's based on usage overall (think 95% average billing). Plus deals can be worked out with the satellite providers. They would rather have the network making money rather than being idle.

But think of the stream coming off the satellite as one big pipe. So that's a known cost based on overall usage. But then it's routed on the ground different ways. Since GPRS/GSM/UMTS/LTE/etc... is a mobile protocol, you're now having to route to another network or if you're the provider having to invest in infrastructure to unencapsulate all this data and turn it back into IP as opposed to WiFi which is already IP. Hence it may be cheaper to still use WiFi opposed to leaving LTE burning. In Europe, you're already used to that tho.

about 8 months ago
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EU To Allow 3G and 4G Connections On Planes

jfalcon Re:What's the point? (106 comments)

Flight 93 once hijacked was flying very low in an attempt to avoid radar after diverting towards Washington. That is how people were able to use their mobile phones.

about 8 months ago
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EU To Allow 3G and 4G Connections On Planes

jfalcon Re:Cell towers (106 comments)

On old school 800mhz AMPS cell phones and at lower altitude this may be true. But today most cell towers are pointed at the ground hence why you don't get a carrier signal until you're approaching/leaving the runway. What happens today is that cell phones just burn power as the phone goes to full power trying to connect. Think of how many people leave their phones on in the luggage or pocket while flying. If a phone can bring down an airplane, don't you think you'd see mobile phone jails prior to boarding?

These systems work on the premise of noise generators that blot out the external signals and a new carrier is presented just above the noise level that commands mobile phones to idle their transmitters down. In fact, one might say this causes *less* interference as you don't have a bunch of phones blasting away RF energy inside the cabin.

about 8 months ago
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EU To Allow 3G and 4G Connections On Planes

jfalcon Re:Only for business (106 comments)

Doesn't apply to Airlines as the connection is satellite driven.

about 8 months ago
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EU To Allow 3G and 4G Connections On Planes

jfalcon Cost Benefit Analysis Needed... (106 comments)

Having worked for a provider of these services, I can tell you that telephone calls are usually very, very short due to cabin noise and connection charges. But SMS and Data have always been a bigger draw. I see this as a win as hopefully this will nudge the FCC/FAA to become more symmetrical in the rules between the US and Europe.

The real question is what will be the cost model for UMTS/LTE vs In-Cabin WiFi as each has a entirely different set of data protocols and are routed differently once they reach the ground network.

about 8 months ago
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Withhold Passwords From Your Employer, Go To Jail?

jfalcon Re:WRONG yourself. (599 comments)

These aren't claims. The lower court and a jury affirmed these are the actions taken nor did Childs ever dispute that he removed the configurations from NVRAM. The appellate court affirmed these findings.

about 9 months ago
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Withhold Passwords From Your Employer, Go To Jail?

jfalcon Re:Terrible Laws (599 comments)

He rigged it to go against best practices to prevent other skilled engineers to maintain a critical network. This wasn't by accident. Everything he did was intentional to make him a "critical irreplaceable employee"... no one is irreplaceable.

about 9 months ago
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Withhold Passwords From Your Employer, Go To Jail?

jfalcon Re:More Courts (599 comments)

The requests were made multiple times. Yes, his manager wasn't heavy handed regarding obtaining passwords due to the desire to keep the talent. But the fact is that he designed in backdoors into a critical system and rigged it to where he was the only one who could access the network management. The rest is theatrics which lead to his demise.

about 9 months ago
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Withhold Passwords From Your Employer, Go To Jail?

jfalcon Re:How, how HOW (599 comments)

Actually, he demanded to see the Mayor after his arrest as he refused to divulge the passwords to his manager or anyone else in the chain before or after arrest.

about 9 months ago
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Withhold Passwords From Your Employer, Go To Jail?

jfalcon Re:Passwords are property of the employer (599 comments)

Wrong - it wasn't that simple.

http://www.courts.ca.gov/opinions/documents/A129583.PDF

In December 2007, the city‟s Human Services Agency (HSA) experienced a
power outage. When power was restored, its computers could not connect to
FiberWAN—the configurations of its CE device had been erased because they had been
saved to VRAM. Childs reloaded the configurations and got the system reconnected.
When the HSA information security officer learned that the CE configurations had been
stored in VRAM, he protested to Childs that this was unacceptable. Citing security
concerns, Childs explained that he wanted to prevent a physical connection to the CE that
would allow someone to obtain the configurations using the password recovery feature.
He suggested disabling the password recovery feature instead; the information security
officer agreed. Tong also agreed to this solution, as it would address a concern about
hacking into the HSA‟s CE device. Soon, Childs disabled the password recovery feature
on all CE devices citywide, and there were no backup configurations on any of the city‟s
CE devices. As the password recovery feature could not be disabled on core PE devices,
Childs erased their configurations that had been stored on NVRAM.

about 9 months ago
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Withhold Passwords From Your Employer, Go To Jail?

jfalcon Re:Passwords are property of the employer (599 comments)

No, that's not true either. The junior admins likely only had access to the switch infrastructure or maybe pieces that were not part of the core network. But from what I recall, he was the only one who had access to the core network infrastructure and ran it in a memory-resident condition without a configuration saved to the NVRAM for "security purposes".

about 9 months ago
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Withhold Passwords From Your Employer, Go To Jail?

jfalcon Re:Passwords are property of the employer (599 comments)

Actually, he went one step further. The way you do a password reset to infrastructure hardware is to bring the hardware down to a single user mode by powercycling and connecting into the console port. But he configured the network in such a way that there was no non-volatile configuration saved and that the act of power cycling would wipe out the configuration of the network thereby making that piece of the network failed until it could be reconfigured which on a network as large as San Francisco would be quite a challenge.

He went to far to believe that he was irreplaceable and the fact that his own supervisors let themselves be put in that situation are almost as culpable.

about 9 months ago
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Satellite Internet connections for South America (specifically Peru). Advice?

jfalcon Re:no such beast. (6 comments)

+1 as you cannot change the laws of physics.

You might want to look into providers like Inmarsat who will be releasing a new product soon that will be >1mbit bi-directional. Also there are Ku band providers like Hughes and others who provide megabits of speed. As for weather, keep in mind as the higher in frequency you go, the more that weather and obstructions play a factor in connection speed.

about 9 months ago
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Atlanta Man Shatters Coast-to-Coast Driving Record, Averaging 98MPH

jfalcon Re:Is this really something we want to celebrate? (666 comments)

I've driven both... alot. And I would consider the Autobahn *marginally* better in terms of condition. And he was driving a vehicle that passed those same vehicle inspections (save for the extra fuel tanks). The reality is that most drivers in America don't drive well. Typically they're way too distracted.

In Europe, there's nothing all that special about the roads except that people have learned to drive in the right lane. When you take away the speed limit, people just go the speed they feel is comfortable. And if everyone is in the right lane, there isn't the issue of having to do erratic maneuvers to avoid other drivers. Certainly there are speed limited areas and some places have speed cameras. But in Germany, to me it was no different than driving in the midwest until you got to the cities... then it was like any other city.

Italy on the otherhand was both awesome to speed... er.. drive and freaky to drive in the cities (pedestrians walk into the streets even on major throughfares without second thought).

about 9 months ago
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210 Degrees of Heads-Up Display: Hands-On With the InfinitEye

jfalcon CastAR has it beat already.. (80 comments)

CastAR has a higher resolution and it can switch between AR and VR as well as Projected AR. Get on the Kickstarter now!
http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/technicalillusions/castar-the-most-versatile-ar-and-vr-system

about 9 months ago

Submissions

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44th anniversary of the Apollo 1 Capsule Fire

jfalcon jfalcon writes  |  more than 3 years ago

jfalcon (163956) writes "Speaking of "Sputnik moments...", the 44th anniversary of the Apollo 1 capsule fire is today. This is NASA's official "Day Of Remembrance" that honors the 17 astronauts that perished in the line of duty.

"NASA's three space-related fatalities occurred within days of one another but years apart. Three astronauts were killed in the Apollo 1 launch pad fire on Jan. 27, 1967. Seven more died aboard Challenger on Jan. 28, 1986. And the seven-member crew of Columbia perished during re-entry on Feb. 1, 2003.""

Link to Original Source

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