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The Daily Harassment of Women In the Game Industry

jittles Re:Pft (894 comments)

Melodramatic? Have you ever listened to the audio chats of FPS co-op games when women are playing with men? I've heard guys who threatened to hunt down their female opponents so they could rape them and murder them just because they got their ass handed to them in a game. That is not juvenile "boys will be boys" behavior. That's somebody who might violently act out if the right circumstances (alcohol, drugs, peer pressure, stress, etc..) were to happen.

That's just gaming. You should read some of the stories about women who get involved in politics. Some people get really unhinged when you attack their personal values. Then you have some guys who go completely off the deep end when it is a woman doing it. Threats of murder come quickly and often. It is sadistic and it is ugly.

I still play some older COD games online with my brother. We're pretty good, and we make a great team. If we play on a Friday night there is a very high chance that someone will send us a private message with a death threat or other harassing language. I've heard it all. These people get pissed when they see two people on a 6 person team account for over half of winning score, assume we cheat, and go ballistic. I've got a friend who is much much better than both of us. When I play with him, that guy will get 70% of the points by himself. He gets a lot of hate.

yesterday
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The Daily Harassment of Women In the Game Industry

jittles Re:Pft (894 comments)

I had a girl when I was in my twenties, whom I told that I wasn't interested in her that way call me repeatedly and just breath into the phone when I answered.. that was creepy. Being a guy didn't make me feel better about it either, I didn't know if she would try to cut my brake lines in my car, or burn my house down with me in it. It sucked.

All of the things mentioned in the article are truly lame, and should never happen to anyone , but I don't see them as sexist per se. It's more just about how shitty the world is.

Oh yeah. Had an ex girlfriend do that in college. She called 5-10 times per day for 3 months. Then for the next 3 months after that I would randomly find her waiting for me at places I never expected to see her (but she knew I went to). She would be waiting outside of my place at 2am when I would get home from a night out (she had no car, she would walk 1 hour and then wait for me outside for as long as it took). It was 6 months of wondering if she was going to try and kill me.

yesterday
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Researcher Finds Hidden Data-Dumping Services In iOS

jittles Re:Huge Caveat! (95 comments)

That only happens if you enter your passcode then see the "Trust this Computer" prompt on a computer that has iTunes installed and you click "Trust" at the prompt. That creates a set of sync keys that the iOS device will then accept to access the various services.

The article made that very clear. But it's not clear to me where these keys are stored - is it on the disk, unprotected, or is it in your encrypted keychain? If the former, it seems to me that - unless you encrypt your computer's hard disk - this means anyone with unfettered access to your computer could get at these keys and thereby get at everything on your iOS device. If the latter, it would be much more difficult to do, even if they otherwise got access to your account.

The guy said he uses this to monitor his kids (which, depending on their age, might be a bit jerky in my opinion). However since he seems like an overzealous parent, I'm wondering if he has his kids' passwords etc., which would be necessary if these keys are in the keychain.

Unless Apple has changed the way this process works, the keys you need to get it to sync aren't in the keychain at all. ON a mac you can find them in ~/Library/MobileSync or something like that. On later versions of Windows it'll be in Users\\AppData\Roaming\Apple\MobileSync

You can quite literally copy and paste them from one machine to another in order to trick an iDevice into syncing with multiple iTunes libraries at once, though you can run into problems with that if you're not careful. However, if encryption is enabled on backups, then you must know the passphrase to actually access a device backup. It's been years since I've played around with this, so I may bit a bit off on the exact directory locations, but they are basically just files sitting around in your user folder.

3 days ago
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Verizon Boosts FiOS Uploads To Match Downloads

jittles Re:aaargh! pinheads in the IT. (230 comments)

All the companies I've worked for didn't allow a split-tunnel VPN from corporate laptops.

Split-tunnel pretty much kills the whole point of using a VPN.

Depends on what you're doing. I allow a split-tunnel into my home VPN because I use that VPN connection strictly to access internal resources remotely. I have no need to route all my web traffic through my home connection when all I want to do is SSH into a box, or copy a file off a network share or something like that. When I am on the road and on an untrusted connection, I just VPN into the home network and run RDP and use the remote machine to access online banking, email, or other services.

Sorry, I thought we were talking about corporate networks and didn't think it was necessary to describe all the different ways in which a VPN might be used.

Well, I suppose the point I am trying to make is there may be corporate edge cases where they want split tunnel. In general, most employees aren't smart enough to realize when to use what, and so the best policy from an IT perspective is to keep the user from shooting themselves in the foot with the VPN. Hell I've known IT people who weren't smart enough to configure the VPN properly to force traffic through the connection, and then failed to properly test whether traffic was leaking out of the tunnel.

3 days ago
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Verizon Boosts FiOS Uploads To Match Downloads

jittles Re:aaargh! pinheads in the IT. (230 comments)

All the companies I've worked for didn't allow a split-tunnel VPN from corporate laptops.

Split-tunnel pretty much kills the whole point of using a VPN.

Depends on what you're doing. I allow a split-tunnel into my home VPN because I use that VPN connection strictly to access internal resources remotely. I have no need to route all my web traffic through my home connection when all I want to do is SSH into a box, or copy a file off a network share or something like that. When I am on the road and on an untrusted connection, I just VPN into the home network and run RDP and use the remote machine to access online banking, email, or other services.

3 days ago
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Russian Government Edits Wikipedia On Flight MH17

jittles Re:cause and/or those responsible (665 comments)

They misidentified Flight 655 as an Iranian F-14 operating out of Bandar Abbas, a known F-14 base but also a civilian airport. That may seem strange to us in Europe or the USA where miltary and civilian operations are conducted from separate facilities but in many parts of the world it is not by any means uncommon for a couple of jet fighters packing bombs and missiles to be launching out of the military half of an airport and an airliner taking off of from the civilian half a minute or two later.

Not strange at all in the US. In fact, I had my Airbus rocked by the afterburners of two F-16s taking off of a civilian airstrip in the US just a few months ago. It was an interesting experience being right behind them in the ground pattern. The US uses civilian airfields for National Guard and reserve bases. I used to work right across the street from one such facility. After Sept 11 that facility had F-16s taking off every 60-90 minutes with live munitions.

3 days ago
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Russian Government Edits Wikipedia On Flight MH17

jittles Re:I don't see the problem. (665 comments)

I seem to recall a murderous kleptomaniac thug being evicted from power on the strength of popular protest.

I think you meant "fleeing from power" after securing all the loot at Putin's holiday home but before anyone could legally hold him to account.

I think he's talking about King George the III bro.

3 days ago
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More Forgotten Vials of Deadly Diseases Discovered

jittles Re:Homeland Security (55 comments)

So, the department that pretends to keep me safe on airplanes is now also the one that pretends to keep me safe from deadly airborne pathogens?

Why is the CDC not holding on to these for safekeeping? Their obvious failure here notwithstanding, I'd think that this is more their bailiwick than DHS's.

Maybe I need to wear a little less tinfoil but how are they going to plan their next airport terrorist attack if they don't have some biological weapons to use? ;)

about a week ago
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New Treatment Stops Type II Diabetes

jittles Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (253 comments)

Wow. You poor guy. If I run 7 miles 4-5 times a week at an 8 minutes per mile pace I can quite literally consume 4000-6000 calories (kcals for you Europeans) and maintain my exact body weight. You can't see my six pack, but you can feel it. I have to consume 60-80 grams of protein (about 20 before and 40-60 after a workout) per day just so that I don't eat myself out of house and home. It's the only thing that seems to control my appetite in the slightest. I'll quite literally eat an entire family sized bag of vegetables and beg for more. The more I work out, the more I crave and consume fatty foods like hamburgers and other such things. When I get into a funk where I'm not working out, I don't crave those things at all. It's very bizarre to me.

about a week ago
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The Improbable Story of the 184 MPH Jet Train

jittles Re:Railroads killed by the government... (195 comments)

That's hard to believe. Freeze/thaw cycles, heavy rain, etc are less than 1% of road wear?

Where I live? Yes. But we don't have freeze/thaw cycles and the roads are designed specifically with the rain in mind.

about a week ago
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People Who Claim To Worry About Climate Change Don't Cut Energy Use

jittles Re: No real surprise (708 comments)

Not everyone lives where there is a connection to the US mainland, coal fired, $0.08-$0.10/kw/hr grid. Hawaii and Alaska have $0.40 kw costs. There are solar incentives, but you don't actually need them to get payback rapidly. There are private islands where there is no utility power whatsoever. If you want power, you are having gas shipped in personally.

Off grid, some people use diesel or non-piped gas generators as their main power. Europe, especially remote areas have power generation costs of almost $1/kwh ( remote mining towns).

I agree that there may be outlying areas where PV could potentially have that kind of ROI, I've just never personally heard of it. That is why I want to know where the guy lives. It didn't sound like he was living on some rock out in the middle of the Pacific or something like that. For his claim to be true he has to be living somewhere unusual, and that is my point. And the odds of him living somewhere that unusual are low.

about a week ago
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People Who Claim To Worry About Climate Change Don't Cut Energy Use

jittles Re: No real surprise (708 comments)

I say was because now I expect it to be cleaner and cheaper and will be installing solar PV on the roof of my new home later this year. They will pay for themselves in ~2yrs,

Wait you are saying your PV cells are going to pay for themselves in 2 years? Is this with or without subsidies and other tax considerations? Where the hell do you live that gets enough sunlight that PV cells can pay for themselves in 2 years? I've never heard of this kind of ROI on PV (or any power generation) anywhere.

about two weeks ago
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Predicting a Future Free of Dollar Bills

jittles Re:Canada has the future :) (752 comments)

As someone from the U.S. who just recently traveled in Canada, I have to say that I like their current currency system a lot. Using loonies ($1) and "twoonies" ($2) coins is nice as they can actually be used easily to buy useful things, which is the primary reason why (I think) dollar coins haven't really taken off in the U.S.

In Canada, parking meters, soda machines, etc.. take $1 and $2 coins. It beats having to feed a pile of small coins into a meter or machine, or trying to iron out and feed a frayed and mangled $1 USD bill into a soda machine and having it rejected. The coins are also fine for face-to-face transactions; they are not unusual. In contrast, Susan B. Anthony dollars in the U.S. can get you some funny looks and many vendors flat out won't accept them, legal tender or not. You can go buy a beer in Canada with the change in your pocket. The Canadian coins make small daily transactions simple.

In the U.S., getting change is a pain in the ass because you invariably wind up accumulating pennies which are a nuisance. You can't use them for tolls or in machines in most places, and toting around a pile of pennies large enough to actually purchase anything with is ridiculous. So you either start carrying a satchel of pennies around trying to pay exact change, or you toss them in a jar, spend time rolling them, and exchange them at the bank for larger denominations (yay! A trip to the bank just to dispose of pennies!). You can also use services like Coinstar, which takes a cut (yay! A special trip to dispose of pennies AND paying some money to a company taking advantage of the dumb system!). In Canada, prices are merely rounded to the nearest 5 cents. Sometimes it is a few pennies in your favor, sometimes it is a few pennies in their favor. On the whole it is a wash, and you would have to be a really miserly SOB for it to worry you.

Canada has cash pretty well figured out. It's not that difficult, U.S.!

I had surgery on my hand about a year ago and spent a couple of weeks at home recuperating. Out of boredom I rolled up hundreds of dollars in coins I had collected over the space of about 4 years. I went into the bank to deposit them and the cute little bank teller told me in the future I had two options: A) I could bring them in unrolled and the bank would use a machine to process them for me at no charge. B) She loved to roll coins and she would be happy to come over and help me.

I had never been so sad to have run out of pennies in my life.

about two weeks ago
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After NSA Spying Flap, Germany Asks CIA Station Chief to Depart

jittles Re:Not really a surprise.... (219 comments)

These folks are quite easy to spot: Just look for someone who is obviously way to intelligent and clever for his job. Like someone with a Ph.D. in international affairs from Harvard and Yale who is doing clerical work at the embassy.

A doctorate level degree does not make you intelligent or clever. And what is the point in not explicitly naming the station chief if they are so easy to spot?

Oh, here's an interesting Pro-Tip: If a foreign diplomat wants to hand you a piece of paper with an explanation of why their country just did something very nasty . . . you don't touch it. You instruct him to read it out loud. If you put your hands on it, his country will report that you "accepted" the explanation. If you don't, you will only hear in the news that the diplomat "read out load" or "recited" the explanation. This is the next thing that you will hear about this, as the professional diplomats from Germany and the US try to paper over the cracks left by the spooks.

Say what? They can't hand each other pieces of paper or they are "accepting" explanations? Do you have some sort of reference for this? This is the most asinine thing I have ever heard, and I have never seen a news story or report where it mentioned a diplomat "recited" or "read out load [sic]" anything. By your explanation everything would have to be done verbally and nothing could ever be done via letter. Were you a member of the diplomatic corps or otherwise employed by the state department?

I don't mean to sound like I am attacking you. I have just never heard anything like this before and I would like to know more about it.

about two weeks ago
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A Box of Forgotten Smallpox Vials Was Just Found In an FDA Closet

jittles Re:And I thought (120 comments)

Forgetting my car keys was a big deal....

Sorry guys. My bad. I thought I had taken those samples with me when I moved back to my home country of Iraq. -- Sadam

about two weeks ago
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Here Comes the Panopticon: Insurance Companies

jittles Re:It's already going on... (353 comments)

He goes exactly the speed limit.....he doesn't heed the law that says "Slower traffic move right"

..and he is preventing you from getting a speeding fine. What's the problem?

He claims to be a safe driver by violating the law that says he must yield to faster traffic. He's making the road dangerous by trying to enforce speed limits on others rather than moving out of traffic for others to exercise their free will. People will speed whether he gets in the way or not. If he wants to enforce speed limits, he should go into law enforcement. Its hypocritical to criticize people for speeding and then violate the law yourself.

about two weeks ago
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Here Comes the Panopticon: Insurance Companies

jittles Re:It's already going on... (353 comments)

Actually, as someone who is a pretty conservative driver, I welcomed the option to let worse drivers subsidize my premiums in exchange for them tracking my driving for a while. I could care less that they know (for example) that I always signal turns and lane changes and don't aggressively accelerate or stop. I could also care less that people who can't demonstrate the same behavior are seen as a higher risk and charged a higher premium.

...except you, of course, since you're on my \. frinds list and all...

How much less can you care, exactly? And accelerating quickly is not always an undesirable thing. Certainly it consumes more gas, but there is a light on my daily commute that I miss any time the person in front of me does not give it a little extra gas. Not to speed, but to get up to speed fast enough that the poorly timed light doesn't cause you to stop right after you just got started.

In any event, the devices they use (OBD-II plugs) can't tell when you use your blinkers or don't. They also can't tell when you're driving like a jackass in the left hand lane and making everyone else around you impatient and interested in getting around you. I have a coworker who thinks he's the safest driver on the planet. I've been stuck behind him and he is frustrating as hell. He goes exactly the speed limit in the middle lane on the interstate because "the left lane is for passing" and the "right lane is for getting off the road. The center lane is for cruising." He's conservative as hell but almost causes accidents because he doesn't heed the law that says "Slower traffic move right" no matter what he thinks the center lane is for.

about two weeks ago
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Researchers Develop New Way To Steal Passwords Using Google Glass

jittles Re:I've always thought (116 comments)

electronic keypads should randomize the numeric order and that the device should not mirror the letter typed on the inout line or on the keypad.

I used to work at a secure facility with a keypad like this. It was the first stage to getting into the building. You would hit a button and the digits would randomize. I eventually got to the point where I could look at the pad and input my 6 digit code within about 2 seconds. It took me about 2-3 weeks to get that down pat. After that, I would only mess up about once or twice a month.

about two weeks ago
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Encryption Keys For Kim Dotcom's Data Can't Be Given To FBI, Court Rules

jittles Re:What a crazy situation (149 comments)

Yeah... as long as the government uses law enforcement as a form of revenue generation (everything from asset forfeiture to speed traps) and rewards police based on the number of citations rather than some metric of police effectiveness, I will continue to view our institutions as corrupt and law enforcement as the principal instrument of that corruption.

In a 3rd world country... a corrupt cop pulls you over and you pay him $5 bucks for a bribe. In the US, he gets $5 in salary incentives from the chief. The only difference is that in the 3rd world, it ends at the cop... in the US, the ticket goes to your driving record and insurance and everything else.

The 3rd world system, in this case, is better.

Well that's not true. I am sure that police officer is expected to bring in a percentage of his bribe money to his superiors. If he ever wants to be promoted he had better be bribing his bosses!

about three weeks ago
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Researchers Claim Wind Turbine Energy Payback In Less Than a Year

jittles Re:Germany (441 comments)

Or, France has substantial rate subsidies.

I just picked France because I know that France sells nuclear energy to Germany. You can compare the rates of any Western European nation to Germany and see the cost per kWh is much higher in Germany than anywhere else. So either everyone is subsidizing their electricity, or Germany's production costs are higher.

about three weeks ago

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