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NASA Tests Microwave Space Drive

jschultz410 Re:Sensationalism at its worst (201 comments)

Whoops! Mis-read that somehow. I thought it said ambient temperature. The fact that they were doing it an vacuum chamber threw me off. And, yes, I know temperature in a vacuum doesn't mean a whole lot. Just read too fast.

about a month and a half ago
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NASA Tests Microwave Space Drive

jschultz410 Re:Sensationalism at its worst (201 comments)

Thank you! You beat me to posting this. From the summary:

"Thrust was observed on both test articles, even though one of the test articles was designed with the expectation that it would not produce thrust. Specifically, one test article contained internal physical modifications that were designed to produce thrust, while the other did not (with the latter being referred to as the "null" test article)."

about a month and a half ago
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Long-range Electric Car World Speed Record Broken By Australian Students

jschultz410 Re:Why all the anti-electric rhetoric? (120 comments)

"The cost savings of switching to an electric will be substantial ..."

All the analyses I've read say that, so far, it takes a very long time for an EV's total cost to match an ICE's. As the cost of gas continues to increase, then EVs become more cost attractive.

about 2 months ago
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Long-range Electric Car World Speed Record Broken By Australian Students

jschultz410 Re:Range is not the issue. Cost is. (120 comments)

Yes, but Musk only claims that this can shave 30% off the costs of the batteries and 3rd party analysts are skeptical of Tesla's claimed and projected costs ...

about 2 months ago
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Long-range Electric Car World Speed Record Broken By Australian Students

jschultz410 Re:That's great, but ... (120 comments)

Yes, but even Tesla projects that this will ultimately only shave 30% off the cost of the batteries and 3rd party analysts are skeptical of Tesla's claims on the cost of their current batteries and there ability to reduce them. It looks to me like a technology breakthrough is needed here, not just economies of scale.

about 2 months ago
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Long-range Electric Car World Speed Record Broken By Australian Students

jschultz410 Re:That's great, but ... (120 comments)

Scroll down on your link:

"Tesla Superchargers represent the most advanced charging technology in the world, capable of charging Model S 16x faster than most public charging stations. We will soon roll out 120 kW Superchargers, which are 33% faster than our current version and can replenish half a charge in as little as 20 minutes, for free."

about 2 months ago
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Long-range Electric Car World Speed Record Broken By Australian Students

jschultz410 Re:That's great, but ... (120 comments)

"Could you elaborate on what is missing?"

With the undercarriage missing like that, it is likely that the interior and storage space of the vehicle is far smaller than is usual in a regular car.

What's missing from EVs more generally is the kind of range the Model S has for a price that is competitive in the mainstream (rather than luxury) market of cars.

about 2 months ago
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Long-range Electric Car World Speed Record Broken By Australian Students

jschultz410 Re:Range is not the issue. Cost is. (120 comments)

I wholeheartedly agree. We are still at least one major breakthrough in battery technology away from EVs being mainstream competitors with ICEs. They need to either get the energy density way up and/or the cost way down somehow.

Tesla charges $10K to upgrade from the 60 Kwh to 85 Kwh battery. That means the 60 Kwh battery pack likely costs somewhere in the $20-25K range all by itself. The 85 Kwh battery pack is likely somewhere in the $30-35K range all by itself.

Tesla claims their next gen superchargers can already give a 50% charge in 20 minutes, so I think the recharge time argument is largely headed out the window already.

about 2 months ago
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Long-range Electric Car World Speed Record Broken By Australian Students

jschultz410 Re:That's great, but ... (120 comments)

Maybe, but they are getting close to an acceptable mix of mileage and recharge time. Recharging for twenty minutes every few hours on a long trip is not so burdensome as to put such an EV out of the running for most people.

about 2 months ago
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Long-range Electric Car World Speed Record Broken By Australian Students

jschultz410 Re:That's great, but ... (120 comments)

"As for reasonable price.... well, no one but you knows what that reasonable price is."

So, you think that more than $60K (and that's lowballing a Model S's cost) is a reasonable price for a car for most people? If Tesla can build a cheaper, say around $30K, but still decent car with the same range and recharge capabilities, then they'll be in the mainstream market and not just the luxury market.

My whole point was that I think we are at least one major breakthrough in battery technology away from that reality because the power pack for the lower range Model S costs about $25K all by itself. Or at least that is what Tesla is charging for it as they charge $10K to upgrade from the 60 Kwh -> 85 Kwh battery pack.

about 2 months ago
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Long-range Electric Car World Speed Record Broken By Australian Students

jschultz410 Re:That's great, but ... (120 comments)

I just went and looked at Tesla superchargers and they claim that their next iteration of superchargers (i.e. - akin to gas stations) will be able to give 50% charge in 20 minutes and 80% charge in 40 minutes. That's pretty exciting assuming it doesn't degrade the lifetime of the batteries.

Now if they can just get the cost of the batteries down to a reasonable level, then this will be a true competitor to ICEs in the near future.

about 2 months ago
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Long-range Electric Car World Speed Record Broken By Australian Students

jschultz410 Re:That's great, but ... (120 comments)

"Right, because gas powered cars built specifically to break speed/efficiency records are so much more practical...oh wait, they're also worthless for everything but breaking records and look just like this one ... Why would you want to go to sleep now and miss all the exciting rapid development?"

My point was that we are still at least one major breakthrough in battery technology away from having EVs actually being meaningful competitors to ICEs.

"And in case you missed it, several Tesla's have already made cross country road trips."

Most people don't have $80+K to drop on a Model S.

"It might take 30 min to charge but 3 years ago it took 12 hours."

Is this actually true? Can you repeatedly fully re-charge a Model S in 30 minutes without doing long term damage to the battery? If so, then that's exciting news to me.

about 2 months ago
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Long-range Electric Car World Speed Record Broken By Australian Students

jschultz410 Re:Getting there. (120 comments)

Absolutely. Until we have batteries that can recharge in less than a half hour (without shortening the battery's life) or go straight for 8-10 hours, long range driving with EVs will be a real hassle.

about 2 months ago
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Long-range Electric Car World Speed Record Broken By Australian Students

jschultz410 That's great, but ... (120 comments)

The body is obviously specially designed to be extremely aerodynamic -- the undercarriage of a typical car is largely missing -- which means it would not be comfortable / practical for normal usage. Also, the tires were extremely narrow to reduce friction. Wake me up when we have a breakthrough on battery technology that actually allows for practical long distance EVs at a reasonable price and/or can recharge in less than half an hour.

about 2 months ago
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Verizon's Accidental Mea Culpa

jschultz410 Re:I think people are really missing the point (390 comments)

"Sounds like there was a handshake agreement between the companies originally. This handshake probably didn't include a late comer like level3."

The problem isn't L3 per se. The problem is that Netflix is a HUGE source of traffic and was sourcing the vast majority of its traffic through L3. That broke the assumptions of most of the tier 1 peering relationships L3 had. Now L3 is dishonestly trying to shame the other carriers into new agreements that allows L3 to keep getting paid by Netflix while its peers don't AND the peers have to upgrade their networks (not just the interconnects!) to handle the load.

"I would argue that if l3 approached these companies and said, we'll install the cards AND maintain these connections on L3's bill, everything will get resolved."

Yes, that is basically what Verizon is trying to get from L3: "Pay us for the unbalanced load that you are pushing onto our network."

about 2 months ago
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Verizon's Accidental Mea Culpa

jschultz410 Re:I'm confused... (390 comments)

My point was that tier 1 carriers like Verizon, AT&T, Sprint and maybe Comcast want Netflix to buy access directly from them, so that the vast majority of Netflix traffic traversing their network would also originate on their network. That way they get paid by Netflix commensurate with the amount of load Netflix causes on their network.

"The bottom line is that Verizon downloads more than it uploads to all carriers everywhere and no amount of accounting will change that [ellipsis] Unbalanced traffic is part of Verizon's nature"

That is not true. Verizon has a tier 1 network that swallowed up UUNET's and MCI Worldcom's backbones. Verizon regularly provides transit access for other tier 2 and tier 3 networks. Traffic to + from residential customers of Verizon would very rarely traverse such links. Instead, the end customers of those tier 2 and tier 3 networks would pull down much more traffic from Verizon than they upload to it.

about 2 months ago
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Verizon's Accidental Mea Culpa

jschultz410 Re:I'm confused... (390 comments)

"I don't think it's Netflix that is breaking the business model, though."

Netflix choosing L3 as its main source network breaks the assumptions that L3 and its transit peers made when they set up their peering agreements. Netflix is such a massive source of traffic that any destination peer of L3 is likely going to have an unbalanced interconnect with L3.

Verizon and other transit carriers are telling Netflix that they are doing it wrong and trying to force them to change. If Netflix is going to originate so much of the traffic on the Internet that they break a core assumption of how the Internet is upgraded and maintained, then they should source it onto multiple transit networks instead of almost entirely through L3.

Now, it makes a TON of sense for Netflix to sole source through one transit provider if they can. They will get massive economies of scale and sweetheart deals because they will be far and away that network's biggest customer. As they've grown into a behemoth, they are being forced to realize that they can't lean on others' goodwill in this manner. They will have to bite the bullet and buy their access through multiple tier 1 carriers so that everyone gets a piece of the pie.

about 2 months ago

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