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Comments

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Wikipedia's "Complicated" Relationship With Net Neutrality

justthinkit Re:Are they the same? (109 comments)

Imagine you have a truck that gets 20 mpg, but gas is now touching $4/gallon. Would you stay with a truck, or switch to a Peel P50? Answer: it is a personal decision that has nothing to do with highways trying to apply selective tolls that discriminate against station wagons full of mag tape.

We control cap. ISPs control non-net neutrality.

yesterday
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Wikipedia's "Complicated" Relationship With Net Neutrality

justthinkit Are they the same? (109 comments)

Is "data against cap" the same as net neutrality? I don't see the relationship.

yesterday
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In a Self-Driving Future, We May Not Even Want To Own Cars

justthinkit Right (453 comments)

(1) affordable -- if your time is worthless.

(2) on demand -- I demand you stand there and wait for the bus to travel on its schedule.

(3) weather-resistant -- bus shelters will keep your head dry, while your clothes get plastered with slush when the bus you don't want drives by.

4 days ago
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In a Self-Driving Future, We May Not Even Want To Own Cars

justthinkit But Car2Go has (453 comments)

Car2Go uses Smart cars, that can be parked wherever after they are used. Hundreds of them around here, a much smarter and more popular concept than a Zipcar. Among other things, they get more "turns" from their cars because, for example, a given person uses the car to go home, parks the car out front, then the next morning uses it again. If you have to return a Zipcar to its spot all the time, that is much less convenient. There seem to be Car2Go setups in at least Austin, Seattle & Portland.

4 days ago
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Lessons Learned From Google's Green Energy Bust

justthinkit Re:Yet (219 comments)

Most of our power usage in our house is at night

Huh? Only major thing I can think of is charging an electric car.

about a week ago
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Lessons Learned From Google's Green Energy Bust

justthinkit Yet (219 comments)

YET. They haven't found a cheap renewable energy tech YET. Coal & other prices will continue to rise, while their efficiencies are the highest they will get. Solar cell costs are plunging, while their efficiencies rise. I predict a collision, a market and a profit.

about a week ago
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Scientists Discover Diamond Nanothreads

justthinkit How about "not diamond"? (79 comments)

How about "not diamond"?

Diamond is characterized by each carbon bonding with 4 other carbons. You can't get a thread out of it. You might claim that you have, but all along that thread there will be carbons not bonded to four others. Those are called defects.

From a diamond point-of-view, this stuff would be considered defect-laden pseudo-'diamond', or just simply not diamond.

Still, sexy headline.

about two weeks ago
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An Applied Investigation Into Graphics Card Coil Whine

justthinkit Re: The Cause (111 comments)

Well said.

I would also like to thank Hardware Canucks for doing this test in the first place. Like most nerd/geek/freaks, I'm very sensitive to noise, and computer case noise is the worst because you will probably have it for the life of the box...that you use for 10 or 15 hours a day, every day.

So, thanks. And thanks.

BTW, it would be kind of awesome if the computer hardware testing sites incorporated sound tests into their general testing of stuff.

about two weeks ago
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Mozilla Updates Firefox With Forget Button, DuckDuckGo Search, and Ads

justthinkit Re:Bastards ... (327 comments)

Monoman + Ostrich = 7 letters long

about two weeks ago
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LHC Data Generation Expected To Scale Up To 400PB a Year

justthinkit Re:A new theory (99 comments)

I am aware of a single replier who wasn't an AC. The last thing I think I did was squander my encounter with "Roger W. Moore".

Out of curiousity, why is it you post as an AC? In fact, most of the nastiest posts in this sub-thread are from ACs. What do you hope to accomplish by this? With me, your attacks are, if anything, a proof of the value of my theory.

If what I was proposing was truly nonsense, the proper response would be to ignore it or offer a kindly word of condolence.

Your level of anger and caustic criticism is out of all proportion.

Get a grip, man.

about three weeks ago
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LHC Data Generation Expected To Scale Up To 400PB a Year

justthinkit Re:A new theory (99 comments)

Roger,

I'm going to look at your Lorentz paper.

And you are going to relax. Don't worry about me. Stick to physics, it is clearly what you do best.

Best,

Floyd

about three weeks ago
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LHC Data Generation Expected To Scale Up To 400PB a Year

justthinkit Re:A new theory (99 comments)

No, not to the "temperature of the universe" as you call it (i.e. the CMB temp). To the calculated temperature. The one that is 10^^120 times bigger. The one that physicists can not explain why it isn't what is measured.

The observed CMB "temperature" is indeed uniform, but this destroys the Big Bang theory, not my theory.

Thanks for the link to Gamow paper. I'll have a look at it but really, if scientists are out by 10^^120 in their measure of the background energy of space, how likely are they to detect motion relative to it?

As to you and I, it is high time we stop chatting. Your statements like:

like most of the people with a loose grip on reality

reveal you to be a positively uncivilized person to interact with.

about three weeks ago
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LHC Data Generation Expected To Scale Up To 400PB a Year

justthinkit Re:A new theory (99 comments)

Care to give an example of how String Theory has advanced anything?

The key point is that it still must be shown consistent with what we know of the world today.

Completely agree.

The key step to getting the theory noticed is doing some of the grunt work of showing it is consistent.

Agreed also. I wouldn't want you to think I am just dumping my theory on the world and walking away. For anything to have a value, it must grow, and grow healthily.

But if you're talking about something that is truly untestable, that makes no predictions at all, then you're not doing science.

Well, luckily for both of us I'm not. But are you?

about three weeks ago
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LHC Data Generation Expected To Scale Up To 400PB a Year

justthinkit Re:A new theory (99 comments)

(1) SoL - I realize that my prediction is of a very slight change in the SoL -- 50% in 100B years, so it will be a tall order to measure that.

(2) I think you failed to grasp what I meant by "absurdly limiting notions". Say you have an idea, that does not appear to be testable. The consensus today would be your idea is worthless because it is untestable. I think that is absurdly limiting because (a) it could still allow you to see how something works more clearly, (b) it might become testable in the future. In short, I think the whole "must be testable" concept is an unnecessary limitation.

(3) I didn't see anything else in your comment related to my theory, so the way I score your review of it is "One thing you think is nonsense, just because, and one thing that we can agree to disagree on but that otherwise has nothing whatsoever to do with my theory, or physics in general."

about three weeks ago
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LHC Data Generation Expected To Scale Up To 400PB a Year

justthinkit Re:A new theory (99 comments)

This wiki page says the finest resolution achievable today is 0.2nm.

The Planck scale is 25 orders of magnitude smaller.

10 million million million million times smaller.

If present spectroscopy's best resolution were the 15 billion light years we can see back in time, Planck scale resolution would be seeing things the size of a tree.

about three weeks ago
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LHC Data Generation Expected To Scale Up To 400PB a Year

justthinkit Re:A new theory (99 comments)

We know that space is expanding. We don't exactly know why -- i.e. the original "explosion" idea makes no sense (horizon problem and space being altogether too uniform), and the fact that it is (relatively recently) seen to be accelerating in its expansion throws off the whole Big Bang theory itself. So we kludge with "dark energy".

I've answered this, in the original paper, when I explained what Spring-And-Loop Theory thinks "dark energy" is.

By the way, my theory's explanation of dark energy also happens to resolve a rather substantial problem with the Standard Model. The SM calculates a background energy of space that is 10^^120 times larger than what we actually measure. My theory says that energy is in fact there. It is not measurable due to the lack of matter in space. When you stick a thermometer in water, you are measuring how many water molecules slam into the glass walls of your thermometer. In space there are no molecules (approximately), so how do you measure the temperature of space?

It is a short step from that to questioning the CMB values themselves, since these are 10^^120 times too small anyway.

about three weeks ago
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LHC Data Generation Expected To Scale Up To 400PB a Year

justthinkit Re:A new theory (99 comments)

Thanks for your comment.

I am not sure why the original AC mentioned "spectroscopic data", nor am I sure how it is to be used to test my theory.

Spring-And-Loop Theory has a Planck-scale basis. Hence my repeated point that it will need to be simulated to allow bigger things (like atoms) and much bigger things (like Earth) and still bigger things (like Solar Systems) and the biggest things (like galaxies) to be modeled.

Spring-And-Loop Theory is like LEGO. It is a building system, not a smashing-things-against-other-things system.

I think the future of physics is simulation, not atom-smashing (or low hanging fruit like measuring the most distant star or galaxy or looking for Earth-like planets). We are stuck in the middle of the order-of-magnitude spectrum. We will never get within a factor of a billion of the Planck-scale. We can just "keep trying" to get there, or we can move to Plan B. I've chosen to move.

Note: This doesn't mean I reject all past and present physics. It does mean that, when an existing theory reaches its "divide by zero" moment, I have no choice but to discard that theory...at least locally...and proceed on foot.

about three weeks ago
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LHC Data Generation Expected To Scale Up To 400PB a Year

justthinkit Re:A new theory (99 comments)

It is not that the basic tenants of chemistry are not tested, challenged, strengthened, or weakened.

It is that the periodic changes and refinements are not Earth shattering.

When you get things right with the foundation of your house, you can build a house that will last. You will still have issues along the way, and there will be maintenance. But you won't have to build 10^^500 houses, or anti-houses, or a house that becomes a cloud that becomes a house again.

about three weeks ago
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LHC Data Generation Expected To Scale Up To 400PB a Year

justthinkit Re:A new theory (99 comments)

(1) the most obvious thing you are missing is that my calculation and prediction is something that can be measured. Period. "Vast implications"? Who cares. Is it right or wrong is all that matters?

(2) Books and books have indeed been written about the Big Bang, etc. And I imagine in Ptolemy's time the same was true. It was certainly true with Newton. And of course Einstein. While String Theory probably caused bookstores to open up whole new wings. Is "number of books" your metric?

if your new theory is so fundamental, you're wasting time with the more abstract stuff when you could give concrete examples

How many concrete things did GR have, at the start, that physicists could rush out and test? Eclipse data is all I am aware of, at least for the first x years.

I think your comment mostly reflects how you find my theory "shocking"...to you. It is different, very different. I'll give you that. But does it ring?

By the way, I bet these two sentences are ones you wish you could have back:
You briefly discuss implications on the impact on the structure of an atom, then you should be able to discuss calculations on the atomic spectrum. No need then to ramble on about more complex issues or problems associated with measurements in deep space etc., but instead would work with data that at the simplest level can be collected in a high school physics course lab, although has been done in detail to very high precision in better equipped labs.

The first sentence, about how I should be immediately working on "atomic spectrum" stuff, directly contradicts your second sentence. Which assumes I have a well stocked research lab that I should be busy working in...but that would be pointless because others have "done in detail"...my theory?!

Spring-And-Loop Theory came about by my trying to understand how gravity, an "attractive" force, worked across empty space. It is not my fault that it has had other repercussions. I am not deliberately trying to jump all over the place with it. But it is a reimagining of physics, no two ways about it. Again, some will have a harder time with this than others.

about three weeks ago
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LHC Data Generation Expected To Scale Up To 400PB a Year

justthinkit Re:A new theory (99 comments)

Sorry. Please replace "Roger" with "AC".

about three weeks ago

Submissions

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CDC caught in scientific fraud

justthinkit justthinkit writes  |  about 3 months ago

justthinkit (954982) writes "With a full headline of "CDC caught in scientific fraud, perpetrating vaccine violence against blacks in shocking eugenics cover-up", the waiting begins. The evidence is coming from a whistleblower, and will be "made public in mere days." The story continues with "MMR vaccine causes autism"...and the CDC knew it. For 12 years. So are Slashdotters still going to say vaccines are harmless? This is almost sacred ground for some."
Link to Original Source
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Tattoos and why we love/hate them

justthinkit justthinkit writes  |  about a year ago

justthinkit (954982) writes "For years I've pondered why people get tattoos. I've studied them, laughed at them and admired them. I've watched several tattoo reality shows and watched friends and closer get tattoos. But if I became Emperor I would ban the word "tattoo" and replace it with the word "mistake", as I think that is usually what they become, sometimes immediately. Still I'm occasionally open-minded and would love to hear other perspectives on the subject. What are your thoughts on tattoos? Do you have one or more? Are they visible? If you have tattoos, do you have piercings? How much have you spent on tattoos? Do you have any tattoos that you regret? What tattoos were painful? Do you have a favorite tattoo, on yourself or someone else? Which area of the body is the best place to have one? And the worst placement for a tattoo?"
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Have they discovered a new particle?

justthinkit justthinkit writes  |  about 2 years ago

justthinkit writes "Live Science reports on the findings of researchers from Amherst College and the University of Texas at Austin that speculate there might be "a new fundamental force of nature". Having alleged long-range effects it may turn out to be electromagnetism in disguise. Still, the prospects are interesting. Thus far there are 3 possible explanations, including an "unparticle" and a Z' (pronounced "Z-prime"). Does anyone have a simple(r) explanation of the "long-range spin-spin interaction" observed?"
Link to Original Source
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Best 32-bit System In 2012

justthinkit justthinkit writes  |  about 2 years ago

justthinkit writes "I have a number of applications that will not run on 64-bit Windows, but I would like to gain the benefits (most better caching) of having more than 4GB of RAM. Am I stuck with these Windows operating systems? And why is Windows Server 2008 Datacenter and Enterprise not included on that page? Should I go with a Linux or Win 7/8 system, and run a VM of Windows XP? Is this a solved problem or a lost cause?"
Link to Original Source
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Why do you hate your printer?

justthinkit justthinkit writes  |  more than 3 years ago

justthinkit writes "After buying the big black ink cartridges for my Canon Pixma printer, only to have them be ignored while I use up the other inks, despite having my printer set to "grayscale", I am ready to buy another printer. Thanks to Slashdot I've learned to go back in time to the era of laser printers, only now I need to choose the best one of those. We need to print & scan, with almost zero faxing. I have narrowed my search down to an HP LaserJet Pro M1212nf or a Canon MF4450 but there seem like dozens of printers I could choose from. Since printers are practically free, and their supplies practically gold-plated, it comes down to which printer will I hate the least?"
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Have you Bumped someone today?

justthinkit justthinkit writes  |  more than 4 years ago

justthinkit writes "You can now give other drivers a piece of your mind without the limitations of horns and high beams, or the risk of road rage. Bump lets you connect your email address to your license plate, allowing you to harass the chick in the red convertible from the comfort of your barcalounger. Does anyone see any opportunites or problems with this kind of service?"
Link to Original Source
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What gadgets go on your pedalled ride?

justthinkit justthinkit writes  |  more than 6 years ago

justthinkit writes "Bicycle ridership is rising faster than the Shuttle, but is safety (and comfort) improving as quickly? What toys and tools are you using to have a safe, more comfortable commute? Anyone using the compressed air horn that fits in your closed fist and taps a supply of air in a bottle the size of a water bottle? I could see semis & dump trucks flipping over when they heard it. How about an electric motor add-on — is it worth the weight? Share your best bike secrets and maybe save a life."
Link to Original Source
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What does Ubuntu mean to you?

justthinkit justthinkit writes  |  more than 6 years ago

justthinkit writes "Apparently, Ubuntu means a lot more than "easy to use Linux" to Doc Rivers and the Boston Celtics. For the NBA team it has become a rallying cry. Translated as "I am because we are", the Celtics break huddles with UBUNTU! (and have made it all the way to the NBA final as a result). So what does Ubuntu mean to you? Is "collective success over individual achievement" what Linux is all about? Or is this moment going to be more like what happened to Tux at Indy?"
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Favorite application of all time?

justthinkit justthinkit writes  |  more than 7 years ago

justthinkit writes "Slashdot readers, you are the most technical people on Earth. You probably average a decade or more of computing experience. What, in all your years of hacking, have you found to be your favorite application of all? What is the one program you would like to have with you on a desert island? And why?

The catch is it has to be a single file and no dependencies other than what the OS of its day provided by default. This is a blast-from-the-past seeker. I am sick of OSes today shipping with hundreds of thousands of files, on install DVDs. I am looking for the most useful yet tiniest ever. Small is indeed beautiful (and Word.exe's chief architect should be President).

I'll kick things off by stating mine — Microsoft Word for DOS, version 5.0a [Version 5.5, patched for Y2K, is available from MS for free]. My choice: Word.exe, 622,428 bytes.

Some of the reasons I love Word.exe? Ran native on OS/2, had a shallow mouse-and-keyboard accessible menu tree (that negated the need for obscure WP-like macros or keyboard templates, although it had one of the best keytemps ever), integrated support for a powerful yet readable macro language, RTF support, embeddable images, CR or CR-LF text file support, changeable screen resolutions (including a half readable graphics mode), first DOS application with native mouse support. And practical things like a hefty 8MB file size limit, auto-created backup files, auto-generated "DOC" file extension, automatic on-screen pagination and absolute 100.0% stability. Pity that XP broke the clipboard access...

At one point I worked at a 500 person engineering firm that was still running Word.exe right into the Windows 98 era. I've written applications that depended on automated calls to Word.exe. Low tech, high age friends of mine use Word.exe to write, manage contact lists and convert documents — for almost 20 years now [timeline]. They bought a new printer 6 or 7 years ago and the dealer installed Windows to install the printer drivers. On their next trip to British Columbia, on route to Hawaii, I was called upon to put it back to "just DOS + Word" for them. Word.exe keeps on keeping on.

If we allow more than a single file but still limiting things to what shipped with the core application, then I would also cite: postscript support (30KB), superb help file (105KB), the most complete spell check database at that time — that allowed user and global add-on dictionaries (180KB), full thesaurus (320KB), excellent tutorial system for mouse and keyboard (900KB)]. Heck, if you excluded the thesaurus & tutorials you could be fit it all on a single bootable 3.5" floppy.

Ok, I think I set the bar pretty high but I am really looking forward to other all-star submissions."

Link to Original Source
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justthinkit justthinkit writes  |  more than 7 years ago

justthinkit writes "John C. Dvorak is at it again, but this time he might be making sense. In a brief piece on pcmag.com he writes about Windows copy issues, calling the words "Preparing to copy" the "Windows' words of doom". His observations range from show-stopping bugs like the "The Long-Filename Anomaly" to annoyances like poor time-to-completion estimates. He doesn't add Vista's new copy slowdown feature to the list, probably hoping that Vista will just go away altogether. So is it time to cut him some slack?"
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justthinkit justthinkit writes  |  more than 7 years ago

justthinkit writes "ZDNet reports that "Microsoft has sold nearly 40 million copies of Windows Vista in the first 100 days, twice as fast as the introduction of Windows XP, Microsft [sic] chairman Bill Gates said in a keynote address Tuesday." Is it just me or do the words "Reality distortion field" come to mind? Bill Gates then added that "sales of Vista in the first five weeks have matched 'the entire installed base of similar software'. Given there are 300 million+ computers in operation, each of which has an operating system, what are we to make of such a bizarre statement?"

Journals

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Top program of all time? I choose Microsoft ________

justthinkit justthinkit writes  |  more than 7 years ago What, in all my years of hacking, is my favorite application of all? What is the one program I would like to have with me on a desert island? Brace yourself...

The catch is it has to be a single file and no dependencies other than what the OS of its day provided by default. I am sick of OSes today shipping with hundreds of thousands of files, on install DVDs. I am looking for the most useful yet tiniest ever. Small is indeed beautiful (and this program's chief architect should be President).

My choice: Microsoft Word for DOS. Specifically, version 5.0a, 622,428 bytes. [Version 5.5, patched for Y2K, is available from MS for free].

Some of the reasons I love Word.exe? Ran native on OS/2, had a shallow mouse-and-keyboard accessible menu tree (that negated the need for obscure WP-like macros or keyboard templates, although it had one of the best keytemps ever), integrated support for a powerful yet readable macro language, RTF support, embeddable images, CR or CR-LF text file support, changeable screen resolutions (including a half readable graphics mode), first DOS application with native mouse support. And practical things like a hefty 8MB file size limit, auto-created backup files, auto-generated "DOC" file extension, automatic on-screen pagination and absolute 100.0% stability. Pity that XP broke the clipboard access...

At one point I worked at a 500 person engineering firm that was still running Word.exe right into the Windows 98 era. I've written applications that depended on automated calls to Word.exe. Low tech, high age friends of mine use Word.exe to write, manage contact lists and convert documents -- for almost 20 years now [Word timeline]. They bought a new printer 6 or 7 years ago and the dealer installed Windows to install the printer drivers. On their next trip to British Columbia, on route to Hawaii, I was called upon to put it back to "just DOS + Word" for them. Word.exe keeps on ticking.

If we allow more than a single file but still limit things to what shipped with the core application, then Word.exe gets even better because of: postscript support (30KB), superb help file (105KB), the most complete spell check database at that time -- that allowed user and global add-on dictionaries (180KB), full thesaurus (320KB), excellent tutorial system for mouse and keyboard (900KB)]. Heck, if you excluded the thesaurus & tutorials you could be fit it all on a single bootable 3.5" floppy.

Word.exe. I don't leave home without it.

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