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Comments

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Reinventing the Axe

justthinkit Re:Wrong wood selection (214 comments)

And don't forgot maple -- seriously warped wood.

Why don't they show a head-to-head comparison. Take a round, split it once. Then two guys with old & new school axes proceed to split the half rounds. A lot easier to perceive a better way.

2 days ago
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Ask Slashdot: What Tech Products Were Built To Last?

justthinkit Re:My toilet (692 comments)

True. And true of many western things. Does chipboard really make a more cost-effective house? I think I prefer Islamic banking to Western as well.

5 days ago
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Nat Geo Writer: Science Is Running Out of "Great" Things To Discover

justthinkit Re:What makes it (292 comments)

As far as the description of the theories, I read the blasted link you posted.

Where does your "blasted" hostility come from, David?

If you want people to think you have actual theories, post links to them, or at least do some SEO so Google can point people to them.

My "home page" link takes you to one of my videos. In the comments section are my full name, the name of my theory, the web page on my site related to each video.

At two points in our sub-thread I linked to articles on my web site.

Do you really want me to believe you were unable to find my web site?

I have not mentioned the name of my theory -- Spring-And-Loop Theory -- in this sub-thread with you, David. What kind of SEO would be needed to help people find a theory they don't know the name of?

By the way, when you type "Spring-And-Loop Theory" into Google, every one of the first ten hits is to my web site.

Your more recent link was to something that had a handy link to a web page describing the speed of light, and that made it perfectly clear that you are a crackpot, even without considering the tone of the writing.

And now my links are "handy"...

Wikipedia defines a crackpot as:
a pejorative term used for a person who holds an unshakable belief that most of his or her contemporaries consider to be false. A crank belief is so wildly at variance with those commonly held as to be ludicrous. Cranks characteristically dismiss all evidence or arguments which contradict their own unconventional beliefs, making rational debate a futile task, and rendering them impervious to facts, evidence, and rational inference.

With "pejorative" wiki-defined as:
A pejorative (also term of abuse, term of disparagement, or derogatory term) is a word or grammatical form of expression that expresses contempt, criticism, hostility, disregard and/or disrespect.

So far I've enjoyed the challenge of maintaining a respectful dialogue with you, David, despite your contempt, criticism, hostility, disregard and disrespect.

Getting back to your "crackpot" descriptor, I would not define my thoughts about my theory as (1) unshakable, nor (2) a belief. In fact I accuse many physicists of those two things. As to (3) what contemporaries consider of my theory, it would be difficult for me to care less than I do. They have shown their cards, their loyalties, their biases and their agendas. I have shown my theory. Let the better theory decide. Nothing else matters. (4) "wildly at variance" is at times true of my theory. Just as QM is at times "wildly at variance" with relativity, etc. I don't for a second consider that a drawback. Rather than comparing only differences, it is wiser to consider that I am proposing a model that works...unlike other theories...when it comes to gravity. And the first completely unified theory. And yet with a level of simplicity that puts the ludicrous hacks of other theories to shame. If that makes me a "crackpot", I am quite comfortable accepting that moniker.

You listed some things not known about light. We know why gravity bends light.

No. Since physicists don't know what gravity is, we can not possibly fully understand how gravity bends light. You are confusing the ability to calculate an effect and confirm the calculation with a measurement, with an actual understanding of what is going on at the lowest level.

Einstein, Feynmann and countless others have tried to figure out what gravity actually is. That quest continues today.

I think I have figured it out.

And where physicists today think they have light all figured out, I think they do not. For starters, they have fixed the speed of light, when I say it is in fact changing (i.e. decreasing) with time. Specifically, at the present measured expansion rate of space, the SoL is decreasing by about 0.25 mph per hundred years.

We know why the speed of light is lower in different materials.

I would make the same point as I did above. You are confusing the ability to calculate & measure, with having a fundamental understanding.

You ask how we know that, if we traveled at the speed of light, photons would appear to come towards us at the speed of light. If we traveled at the speed of light we actually wouldn't notice anything.

I take it you meant to say that you wouldn't notice anything _different_ about the speed of the photons. That they are in fact traveling at the expected speed. The speed of light. Just as I said in my article.

You also forgot to comment on why this would be true. Since no one has ever ridden on a beam of light, it is just a thought experiment, with the presently accepted "answer" coming from a theory. None of that reflects that relativity, or any other current theory, has a full understanding of what is going on.

Relativity is a starting point. Exactly as Quantum Mechanics is.

The problems of both are legion. QM reduces everything to probability, which is the opposite of having a full understanding. More like psychology or psychiatry, than science. Relativity is all well and good, until you get to endpoints...or the rotation rate of stars in a galaxy (forcing the introduction of a dark matter crutch).

Unlike most physicists, I wasn't content to settle for broken theories.

In short, you're ignorant of some fairly basic physics.

The closest you have come, David, to actually saying anything about my theory, are the remarks you make based on my "what we don't know about the speed of light" preamble at the beginning of my SoL article.

They were "set up" remarks. To show where we are at today.

Honestly, I don't think you realize how deficient modern theories are, David. Ironic, considering the thread we are commenting in.

Safe to say, if one does not see deficiencies, one is not capable of conceiving a new theory.

I saw them. I still see them. I came up with something better.

In order for a theory to be accepted, it needs to deal with the things we already know. It either needs to agree with accepted theory, or show why that theory is wrong. You clearly don't know enough of what we already know to do either.

It either needs to agree with accepted theory, or show why that theory is wrong.

Not quite right. The choices are (1) agree with current theory, (2) show the flaw in the current theory, or (3) make a prediction (like Einstein did about light being bent by gravity) that can be confirmed by experimentation.

My prediction about the SoL decreasing does exactly this.

Yet, once again, you show your contempt and disrespect.

At this point I can see no point in conversing further with you, David. Your mind is quite obviously closed.

Have a nice day.

5 days ago
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Nat Geo Writer: Science Is Running Out of "Great" Things To Discover

justthinkit Re:What makes it (292 comments)

(1) The facts that it has theories not well described,

I'm not sure what your definition of well defined is.

The original theory is 15,000 words of html.
The references section is 2,000 words of html.
The extensions (consequences) of that theory are another 40,000 words of html.

I do make the repeated point in, for example, this 25,000+ word document, that my theory needs to be developed through simulation. Each and every new theory of the Planck scale will need this, for what should be obvious reasons. Atom smashers can only take us so far -- we are already at the practical limit of those.

My Bachelor's Thesis in Chemical Engineering involved the ground-breaking for its time use of simulation to determine the feasiblity of a two-stage spouted-bed coal pyrolysis plant. The simulations needed for this theory are considerably beyond what I am able to do today. But there is always tomorrow.

(2) but apparently different from standard physics,

Absolutely right here.

But given the flaws in every major "standard" theory of physics, is it seriously a drawback that my theory is different?

Consensus seems to be the process of abandoning all beliefs, principles, values and policies. - Margaret Thatcher

I don't believe that a house of anything but cards can be built on faulty foundations.

If I were advocating warp drives, 10^^500 universes, or an inflation miracle, I would concede point (2).

(3) with no obvious reason to believe them?

You are completely wrong here.

(a) numerous flaws & gaps in our present "understanding" are explained by my new theory -- your choosing to ignore those puts you in the flamebait category,

I always cheer up immensely if an attack is particularly wounding
because I think, well, if they attack one personally,
it means they have not a single argument left. - Margaret Thatcher

(b) many people have had similar ideas in the past (e.g. particulary obvious regarding the ether) or wanted to achieve what my theory does (i.e. unification of the four forces, an actual explanation of how gravity works and of what exactly is the speed of light),

(c) predictions made by my theory alone (e.g. regarding the decreasing speed of light) would/will have profound consequences.

(4) The opinions expressed on the only site referencing it I could find?

Einstein was so alone at the start that it took 30 years for his theory to be widely accepted.

If it is one again one against forty-eight,
then I am very sorry for the forty-eight.
- Margaret Thatcher

If you know a place, other than at the beginning, where a new theory can start, I'd be appreciative if you would share it.
- - - - -
By the way, isn't it interesting how you didn't point out a single flaw in my theory?

Wikipedia's definition of Pseudoscience as
a claim, belief or practice which is presented as scientific, but does not adhere to a valid scientific method, lacks supporting evidence or plausibility, cannot be reliably tested, or otherwise lacks scientific status...
appears to apply to your comments, David.

about a week ago
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Nat Geo Writer: Science Is Running Out of "Great" Things To Discover

justthinkit What makes it (292 comments)

What makes it a "crackpot" physics web site? The fact that it has a theory different than your own?

One of the greatest pains to human nature
is the pain of a new idea.
- Walter Bagehot

about two weeks ago
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Nat Geo Writer: Science Is Running Out of "Great" Things To Discover

justthinkit Re:Others did (292 comments)

ShanghaBill's original point was that "if Einstein had not had these insights, someone would have, probably within a decade of 1905."

You point out one of the differences between Einstein's theory, and those he liberally "borrowed" from. You ignore that others had insights, in the same field, at the same time and even before Einstein's relativity was published. Poincare was the giant of his day, and published within a year of Einstein.

Since you are apparently fond of showing how Einstein's theory was different, let's point out another way he differed. Einstein decided to discard the ether. I suggest this will prove to be a major mistake, and that we must "get it back" for physics to continue to get better at describing our world.

about two weeks ago
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Nat Geo Writer: Science Is Running Out of "Great" Things To Discover

justthinkit Re:Until warp drive is invented... (292 comments)

science is trying to better understand the world, by making models predicting something. It isn't engineering.

I think you may have unintentionally identified our present scientific folly. Scientists are lost in engineering, and fantasizing. Everything but science.

It is exactly an engineering mindset that is needed to come up with a new theory. Why? Because engineering starts with a "what works?" mentality, then tries to define why it works, to quantify it and remove the uncertainty.

What works (i.e. is needed) today is (1) to discard relativity, field theories and the standard model due to their glaringly intractable failings (i.e. their bridges keep falling down), (2) start at the Planck scale (i.e. it should be empirically obvious that we need to start with the bottom level of the building) and (3) embrace the ether.

about two weeks ago
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Nat Geo Writer: Science Is Running Out of "Great" Things To Discover

justthinkit Re:Level of public funding ? (292 comments)

"The more important fundamental laws and facts of physical science have all been discovered, and these are so firmly established that the possibility of their ever being supplanted in consequence of new discoveries is exceedingly remote."
- Michelson, 1903

The more dominant theories trying to describe the fundamental laws and facts of physical science have all been selected, and these are so firmly locked in that the possibility of their ever being supplanted in consequence of new discoveries is exceedingly remote. Thank goodness.

Complete and utter wastes of time like string theory are useful at creating employment, while guaranteeing that nothing will ever be gained/learned/discovered.

Instead of resolving theory conflicts, or encouraging new theories, we have "status quo" stagnation. There is no money in a new theory, especially one that is better than the old ones.

Rather than costing $5B/year, like the LHC, a new theory could appear at zero cost. Luckily the pay-to-publish system should ensure its stillbirth.

about two weeks ago
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Nat Geo Writer: Science Is Running Out of "Great" Things To Discover

justthinkit Others did (292 comments)

Others did have "those insights". Poincare & Lorentz, for example. Einstein just never credited them. Prompting E.T. Whittaker to not give Einstein any credit.

about two weeks ago
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Smart Car Tipping Trending In San Francisco

justthinkit Marketing bonanza (371 comments)

Smart puts up 3 cars to get tipped over. Gets ten or a hundred times that money back in free advertising. Smart.

about two weeks ago
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Google Chrome 34 Is Out: Responsive Images, Supervised Users

justthinkit Just this one page as a tab (115 comments)

32-bit Windows -- chrome taking 256MB...at first. Has shrunk down to 165MB a few minutes later. Not my idea of acceptable memory usage.

Opera, with 17 tabs, and it has been running for a few days, is only using 323MB

about two weeks ago
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Meet the Diehards Who Refuse To Move On From Windows XP

justthinkit Couldn't agree more (641 comments)

Couldn't agree more, with your comment, and with the submitter's point.

Interesting that my non-patched XP system is and always has been clean, whereas the Win 7 systems I support...that receive all patches and have current & working A/V...get infected regularly.

PIBKAC.

about two weeks ago
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FCC Orders Comcast To Stop Labeling Equipment Rental a Service Fee

justthinkit Right (97 comments)

Got live cricket on right now, on ESPN of all places.

TV is also my radio. Optional background "noise".

ESPN is my channel of choice because it is the real world, as opposed to fake sit-coms, even worse "dramas", hideously depressing CSI type shows, and trailer trash reality shows.

My father played cricket, so there is a back story that adds to this live event.

I've played numerous sports, and love a few of them enough to watch them on TV. For the rest, it is about the human spirt. Amazing feats of endurance, athleticism and will.

Besides, TV is part of our "bundle", coupled with two things we absolutely need -- iNet + WIRED phone service.

To each his own. TV is not needed by some (especially those who are not interested in sports). TV works for others who find something good in it.

This thread is really about Comcast, and Comcast is really about monopoly. If there wasn't one, Comcast wouldn't be playing billing games. They would be offering things customers want, in a bid to _earn_ customers.

about two weeks ago
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A Third of Consumers Who Bought Wearable Devices Have Ditched Them

justthinkit SciAm magazines (180 comments)

I went through a phase where I would read a Scientific American magazine in bed. Put me right to sleep. But obviously not because it stopped me thinking.

I don't agree with your premise. For one thing, it would depend on what the podcast you are listening to is about.

about three weeks ago
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Continued Rise In Autism Diagnoses Puzzles Researchers, Galvanizes Advocates

justthinkit Re:Oh, thank goodness (558 comments)

You say "the only evidence is one flawed study". (1) not true, tons of evidence, (2) you can't prove something is the "only" by linking to a "study" that you say is the "only" one.

Regarding the movie I linked to, I happen to know more about that movie than I let on. Inside story type of info, but I want to preserve confidentiality.

In any event, it is not the movie but the information the movie reveals, that should be debated, attacked or learned from. Instead of doing this you ask if I am "for real". Since this is a pressing question for you, I shall endeavour to reassure you by saying I am quite real, with the usual numbers of fingers and toes.

I await you actually talking about the three or four points I brought up in my original post...

about three weeks ago
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Continued Rise In Autism Diagnoses Puzzles Researchers, Galvanizes Advocates

justthinkit Oh, thank goodness (558 comments)

Oh, thank goodness you quoted Wikipedia. That settles it.

To the grandparent poster, check out "The Greater Good". Will totally change your view of vaccinations. One of the most profound things I learned was that in "vaccine vs no vaccine" studies, the "no vaccine" people in some cases still received the mercury (!) and in other cases received a different vaccine (!). That's right, there was no "control" group so they compared the health effect of a mercury-containing vaccine with...a mercury-containing control and/or a different vaccine.

Other juicy bits from that documentary:
- The number of vaccines given to kids these days is TEN times what was given 30 or 40 years ago.
- some vaccines still use mercury.
- some autistic individuals became so at the same time they (1) got a bunch of vaccinations and (2) were then tested and found to have toxic levels of mercury in their system, prompting (3) a successful lawsuit, and resulting compensation.

about three weeks ago
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Continued Rise In Autism Diagnoses Puzzles Researchers, Galvanizes Advocates

justthinkit Spot on (558 comments)

Best comment I've ever seen on autistic people.

I have extensive experience caring for and living with them.

At this point I agree with Dr. Robert Melillo, as I posted above. With TAS individual I live with, I have seen considerable improvement but it has come through repeatedly teaching new/better behaviors, not through letting the individual become more and more shut off.

FWIW, I think armchair experts are the biggest problem. Try living with one, or caring for many of them for many years. You'll change your tune.

about three weeks ago
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Continued Rise In Autism Diagnoses Puzzles Researchers, Galvanizes Advocates

justthinkit The reason (558 comments)

The reason many call it a craze or a fad, is that it deflects attention away from the real cause(s).

I like the book "Disconnected Kids" because it points the finger at developmental imbalance in the brain. This makes the most sense to me because (1) when you've met one autistic person, you've met one autistic person, (2) many things can throw off development (especially with the dozens and dozens of vaccines now given to infants, and fluoridation, and microwave radiation broadcasters...I mean, baby monitors), (3) the guy offers techniques to re-balance one's brain that I think makes sense and work to at least an extent, (4) he has opened dozens of clinics to help treat people, etc.

"It's a fad" is the 21st century equivalent of "You're a racist!" Quick and easy deflection. The real fad is corporations having armies of minions who reverse-troll for their clients by the hour on social media and places like /. and Ars.

about three weeks ago
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WSJ: Prepare To Hang Up the Phone — Forever

justthinkit Re:Works both ways (449 comments)

I'm not sure why you think security cameras are a problem.

Let's study the behavior of a customer called Nefarious. He opens packages in the store, pocketing a handful of delicious Lindt chocolates here, and pouring half a pound of Starbucks beans into his other pocket over there. A quick checkout for his case of Bud and then he breezes through the exit doors.

Retail has slim profit margins. Grocery stores, it is like 1 or 2%. At Costco let's say it is 5%. But the cost of Nefarious's visit is beyond what he took out. He left a $9.89 bag of Lindt that is fit only for the break room. Same for the Starbucks bag -- all 5 pounds of it. That case of Bud only cost ...I have no idea, not having consumed alcohol for 30 years, but let's say $18. Rough calculation, the store made a buck on the Bud, and lost $20 or $30 on the other two items. How long can they sustain that?

A big part of store security is deterence. You won't stop everyone, but cameras, or store walkers, or receipt checkers will discourage many from abusing the system.

I want to shop at a place that deters cheat, crooks and scumbags. This is definitely a case where, if you are not breaking the law what do you have to be concerned about?

Getting back to your camera concerns...When you were going through the checkout, the cashier was watching you. If you pocketed something, or tried to slip something past them in the bottom of your shopping cart, they would catch it. Cameras "see" more but notice a hundred times less. IOW, on average no one ever looks at you on tape. It is there to settle the question of did someone put something in their pocket (or what did the guy with the cap gun look like)?

If you really want to be creeped out, go to a clothing store. The level of security and inconvenience there is very off-putting (to me anyway). Stuff is cabled together. Huge dongles hang off that T-shirt you wanted to try on. There is a limit on how many things you can try on in the change stall with 2 foot tall saloon doors. Etc.

Still, the only camera that would bother me is one (1) in a change room, or (2) in a toilet stall. I'm not aware of any of those...

about three weeks ago
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WSJ: Prepare To Hang Up the Phone — Forever

justthinkit Re:Works both ways (449 comments)

I question the sincerity of your response, but can agree with the point that different inspections have different levels of gain for both parties.

Parents checking the texts on their kid's phone can learn quite a bit, and this is a good thing, even if the child would freak if she found out.

Your local auto repair shop is probably looking for extra work when they tell you your radiator could use a flush. But this is a relationship, that can work both ways. If they report stuff as broken that ain't, you find some other repair shop. If they are right about the radiator flush, you thank them (at least to yourself) and the relationship improves.

Your employer checking what you say on Facebook is not a bad thing. Them requiring you hand over your password is beyond a bad thing. Still, it also serves to tell you that you don't want to work for this company...and that is a good thing.

Not everything is a zero sum gain, denzacar.

about three weeks ago

Submissions

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Tattoos and why we love/hate them

justthinkit justthinkit writes  |  about 9 months ago

justthinkit (954982) writes "For years I've pondered why people get tattoos. I've studied them, laughed at them and admired them. I've watched several tattoo reality shows and watched friends and closer get tattoos. But if I became Emperor I would ban the word "tattoo" and replace it with the word "mistake", as I think that is usually what they become, sometimes immediately. Still I'm occasionally open-minded and would love to hear other perspectives on the subject. What are your thoughts on tattoos? Do you have one or more? Are they visible? If you have tattoos, do you have piercings? How much have you spent on tattoos? Do you have any tattoos that you regret? What tattoos were painful? Do you have a favorite tattoo, on yourself or someone else? Which area of the body is the best place to have one? And the worst placement for a tattoo?"
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Have they discovered a new particle?

justthinkit justthinkit writes  |  about a year ago

justthinkit writes "Live Science reports on the findings of researchers from Amherst College and the University of Texas at Austin that speculate there might be "a new fundamental force of nature". Having alleged long-range effects it may turn out to be electromagnetism in disguise. Still, the prospects are interesting. Thus far there are 3 possible explanations, including an "unparticle" and a Z' (pronounced "Z-prime"). Does anyone have a simple(r) explanation of the "long-range spin-spin interaction" observed?"
Link to Original Source
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Best 32-bit System In 2012

justthinkit justthinkit writes  |  about a year and a half ago

justthinkit writes "I have a number of applications that will not run on 64-bit Windows, but I would like to gain the benefits (most better caching) of having more than 4GB of RAM. Am I stuck with these Windows operating systems? And why is Windows Server 2008 Datacenter and Enterprise not included on that page? Should I go with a Linux or Win 7/8 system, and run a VM of Windows XP? Is this a solved problem or a lost cause?"
Link to Original Source
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Why do you hate your printer?

justthinkit justthinkit writes  |  more than 2 years ago

justthinkit writes "After buying the big black ink cartridges for my Canon Pixma printer, only to have them be ignored while I use up the other inks, despite having my printer set to "grayscale", I am ready to buy another printer. Thanks to Slashdot I've learned to go back in time to the era of laser printers, only now I need to choose the best one of those. We need to print & scan, with almost zero faxing. I have narrowed my search down to an HP LaserJet Pro M1212nf or a Canon MF4450 but there seem like dozens of printers I could choose from. Since printers are practically free, and their supplies practically gold-plated, it comes down to which printer will I hate the least?"
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Have you Bumped someone today?

justthinkit justthinkit writes  |  more than 3 years ago

justthinkit writes "You can now give other drivers a piece of your mind without the limitations of horns and high beams, or the risk of road rage. Bump lets you connect your email address to your license plate, allowing you to harass the chick in the red convertible from the comfort of your barcalounger. Does anyone see any opportunites or problems with this kind of service?"
Link to Original Source
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What gadgets go on your pedalled ride?

justthinkit justthinkit writes  |  more than 5 years ago

justthinkit writes "Bicycle ridership is rising faster than the Shuttle, but is safety (and comfort) improving as quickly? What toys and tools are you using to have a safe, more comfortable commute? Anyone using the compressed air horn that fits in your closed fist and taps a supply of air in a bottle the size of a water bottle? I could see semis & dump trucks flipping over when they heard it. How about an electric motor add-on — is it worth the weight? Share your best bike secrets and maybe save a life."
Link to Original Source
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What does Ubuntu mean to you?

justthinkit justthinkit writes  |  more than 5 years ago

justthinkit writes "Apparently, Ubuntu means a lot more than "easy to use Linux" to Doc Rivers and the Boston Celtics. For the NBA team it has become a rallying cry. Translated as "I am because we are", the Celtics break huddles with UBUNTU! (and have made it all the way to the NBA final as a result). So what does Ubuntu mean to you? Is "collective success over individual achievement" what Linux is all about? Or is this moment going to be more like what happened to Tux at Indy?"
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Favorite application of all time?

justthinkit justthinkit writes  |  more than 6 years ago

justthinkit writes "Slashdot readers, you are the most technical people on Earth. You probably average a decade or more of computing experience. What, in all your years of hacking, have you found to be your favorite application of all? What is the one program you would like to have with you on a desert island? And why?

The catch is it has to be a single file and no dependencies other than what the OS of its day provided by default. This is a blast-from-the-past seeker. I am sick of OSes today shipping with hundreds of thousands of files, on install DVDs. I am looking for the most useful yet tiniest ever. Small is indeed beautiful (and Word.exe's chief architect should be President).

I'll kick things off by stating mine — Microsoft Word for DOS, version 5.0a [Version 5.5, patched for Y2K, is available from MS for free]. My choice: Word.exe, 622,428 bytes.

Some of the reasons I love Word.exe? Ran native on OS/2, had a shallow mouse-and-keyboard accessible menu tree (that negated the need for obscure WP-like macros or keyboard templates, although it had one of the best keytemps ever), integrated support for a powerful yet readable macro language, RTF support, embeddable images, CR or CR-LF text file support, changeable screen resolutions (including a half readable graphics mode), first DOS application with native mouse support. And practical things like a hefty 8MB file size limit, auto-created backup files, auto-generated "DOC" file extension, automatic on-screen pagination and absolute 100.0% stability. Pity that XP broke the clipboard access...

At one point I worked at a 500 person engineering firm that was still running Word.exe right into the Windows 98 era. I've written applications that depended on automated calls to Word.exe. Low tech, high age friends of mine use Word.exe to write, manage contact lists and convert documents — for almost 20 years now [timeline]. They bought a new printer 6 or 7 years ago and the dealer installed Windows to install the printer drivers. On their next trip to British Columbia, on route to Hawaii, I was called upon to put it back to "just DOS + Word" for them. Word.exe keeps on keeping on.

If we allow more than a single file but still limiting things to what shipped with the core application, then I would also cite: postscript support (30KB), superb help file (105KB), the most complete spell check database at that time — that allowed user and global add-on dictionaries (180KB), full thesaurus (320KB), excellent tutorial system for mouse and keyboard (900KB)]. Heck, if you excluded the thesaurus & tutorials you could be fit it all on a single bootable 3.5" floppy.

Ok, I think I set the bar pretty high but I am really looking forward to other all-star submissions."

Link to Original Source
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justthinkit justthinkit writes  |  more than 6 years ago

justthinkit writes "John C. Dvorak is at it again, but this time he might be making sense. In a brief piece on pcmag.com he writes about Windows copy issues, calling the words "Preparing to copy" the "Windows' words of doom". His observations range from show-stopping bugs like the "The Long-Filename Anomaly" to annoyances like poor time-to-completion estimates. He doesn't add Vista's new copy slowdown feature to the list, probably hoping that Vista will just go away altogether. So is it time to cut him some slack?"
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justthinkit justthinkit writes  |  more than 6 years ago

justthinkit writes "ZDNet reports that "Microsoft has sold nearly 40 million copies of Windows Vista in the first 100 days, twice as fast as the introduction of Windows XP, Microsft [sic] chairman Bill Gates said in a keynote address Tuesday." Is it just me or do the words "Reality distortion field" come to mind? Bill Gates then added that "sales of Vista in the first five weeks have matched 'the entire installed base of similar software'. Given there are 300 million+ computers in operation, each of which has an operating system, what are we to make of such a bizarre statement?"

Journals

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Top program of all time? I choose Microsoft ________

justthinkit justthinkit writes  |  more than 6 years ago What, in all my years of hacking, is my favorite application of all? What is the one program I would like to have with me on a desert island? Brace yourself...

The catch is it has to be a single file and no dependencies other than what the OS of its day provided by default. I am sick of OSes today shipping with hundreds of thousands of files, on install DVDs. I am looking for the most useful yet tiniest ever. Small is indeed beautiful (and this program's chief architect should be President).

My choice: Microsoft Word for DOS. Specifically, version 5.0a, 622,428 bytes. [Version 5.5, patched for Y2K, is available from MS for free].

Some of the reasons I love Word.exe? Ran native on OS/2, had a shallow mouse-and-keyboard accessible menu tree (that negated the need for obscure WP-like macros or keyboard templates, although it had one of the best keytemps ever), integrated support for a powerful yet readable macro language, RTF support, embeddable images, CR or CR-LF text file support, changeable screen resolutions (including a half readable graphics mode), first DOS application with native mouse support. And practical things like a hefty 8MB file size limit, auto-created backup files, auto-generated "DOC" file extension, automatic on-screen pagination and absolute 100.0% stability. Pity that XP broke the clipboard access...

At one point I worked at a 500 person engineering firm that was still running Word.exe right into the Windows 98 era. I've written applications that depended on automated calls to Word.exe. Low tech, high age friends of mine use Word.exe to write, manage contact lists and convert documents -- for almost 20 years now [Word timeline]. They bought a new printer 6 or 7 years ago and the dealer installed Windows to install the printer drivers. On their next trip to British Columbia, on route to Hawaii, I was called upon to put it back to "just DOS + Word" for them. Word.exe keeps on ticking.

If we allow more than a single file but still limit things to what shipped with the core application, then Word.exe gets even better because of: postscript support (30KB), superb help file (105KB), the most complete spell check database at that time -- that allowed user and global add-on dictionaries (180KB), full thesaurus (320KB), excellent tutorial system for mouse and keyboard (900KB)]. Heck, if you excluded the thesaurus & tutorials you could be fit it all on a single bootable 3.5" floppy.

Word.exe. I don't leave home without it.

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