Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Google Faces Deluge of Nexus One Complaints

kelnos Re:I can fully understand the operators (329 comments)

It's a bit silly to claim that "most of the world" does it that way, since, well, that's patently false, unless you'd (erroneously) consider the US to be most of the world.

But your other point is still valid; since the Nexus One is primarily offered in the US right now, most of the potential N1 buyers are likely from the US... and since the operators in the US almost universally cover support for the phones, it *is* reasonable to believe that most N1 owners would expect support for it to come from T-Mobile.

more than 4 years ago
top

NVIDIA Driver Developer Discusses Linux Graphics

kelnos Re:Measurement from the NVIDIA site? (317 comments)

Documenting the hardware was necessary, but even fully-documented, it would have only gotten you ~2% of the way towards the ultimate goal of *being* a software-defined modem.

I don't really know anything about software modems, so I won't comment on that, but the release of documentation by AMD was hugely useful to the open source radeon driver.

There's another problem with video drivers -- patents. As a practical matter, everyone in the industry violates at least one patent belonging to the other big players, and they're *all* sitting ducks for every patent troll who comes wandering along.

Except that all of the major desktop video players now -- except nvidia -- have either open sourced their drivers or provided full (as far as we know) specifications for their hardware. Nvidia is the last holdout, and hasn't sued Intel or AMD for infringing on any of their patents.

So, maybe they are indeed violating someone else's patents, but considering that you yourself claim that "everyone" in the industry violates the others' patents, there's obviously an opportunity for cross-licensing, just like lots of other competing companies do.

If it's still true that nvidia is violating someone else's patents, I have little sympathy for them. In that case, they're essentially breaking the law, and hiding that fact.

about 5 years ago
top

Car Glass Rules Could Impair Cell, GPS and Radio Signals In CA

kelnos Re:! surprising (762 comments)

If the majority of people in government are incompetent, then the government is incompetent.

about 5 years ago
top

Facebook User Arrested For a Poke

kelnos Re:No communication is no communication. (394 comments)

Yes, because if someone was harassing me in real life to the point that I had to get a restraining order, the absolute first thing I'd think of is my Facebook account.

Somehow I think not.

The bottom line is that someone was ordered not to engage in any form of contact, but, instead of following that order, decided to do so anyway, knowing full well what they were doing. The medium of contact is irrelevant. Intent is king when considering protective order violations. While the defendant is expected to avoid contact with the restrained (e.g., don't go to their place of work to instigate contact), they're not required to go out of their way to make it difficult for the restrained to contact them.

about 5 years ago
top

Facebook User Arrested For a Poke

kelnos Re:No communication is no communication. (394 comments)

Nowadays there's a privacy setting to determine who's allowed to poke you, but it probably still defaults to "Everyone" unless you explicitly change it.

about 5 years ago
top

Is Working For the Gambling Industry a Black Mark?

kelnos Re:porn? (467 comments)

In addition to what the other reply said, it also isn't certain that the stats post-doc was always making decisions based on the statistics. Just like anyone else, his decisions were undoubtedly influenced to some degree by emotions, sometimes not so much, sometimes strongly.

And even if you *are* going by the stats, there's always the human element, and the fact that you're playing against other people who have their own different strengths and faults. Unless everyone around the table is a computer, you can't expect to always play well based solely on the math.

about 5 years ago
top

Ted Dziuba Says, "I Don't Code In My Free Time"

kelnos Re:Ted Dziuba (619 comments)

Well, he still has Score:1 (30% underrated) so his message has been deemed at least as useful as a non-AC comment that hasn't received any moderation at all. Regardless, aside from the questionable nature of his assertion that you can "just do a $1MM project with a few minutes of explanation," I agree for the most part with the rest of what he says. You can think that's sad... and I can think you're wrong. Whatever, no skin off my back.

about 5 years ago
top

Ted Dziuba Says, "I Don't Code In My Free Time"

kelnos Re:Ted Dziuba (619 comments)

Why? Seems like a straightforward thing to bring up during an interview.

Newsflash: people lie in interviews.

Of course they do. But that's why you ask them to describe some of the things they've done, in detail, and ask probing questions about why they did it, how they did certain things, and problems they had. If they can't, then maybe they're lying. If they can, then either they're telling the truth, or they're exceptional liars.

If their spare-time coding also includes contributions to open source, take notes: it should be pretty easy to check up on after the interview since those kinds of things are usually pretty public.

Unless you are a complete moron it does not matter how bad you are at writing code, what matters is how willing you are to learn to improve.

If that were the case, experience wouldn't mean squat during a software engineering interview. I've done a few interviews as the interviewer, and I wouldn't even consider an applicant who codes poorly, especially when there are so many people who are already more than competent. If they are just lacking experience, that's fine, if the position isn't too advanced. But if they're actually bad coders... no, sorry, but they're just going to be a burden. It's pretty tough to judge a person's ability to improve in a 45-60 minute interview.

Just give them a basic coding aptitude test in their specialist language (on paper, no IDE) and see how they do.

While that's certainly applicable for some jobs, many employers may not find that so useful. I wouldn't say I've interviewed for tons of coding jobs, but I've never had anything approaching a "basic coding aptitude test." The interview questions were usually coding-related, and yes, I've written code on whiteboards during interviews, but most of them are more about critical thinking and problem solving than basic coding ability.

about 5 years ago
top

Ted Dziuba Says, "I Don't Code In My Free Time"

kelnos Re:Coding in your spare time shows an interest.. (619 comments)

Yes, and people with children seem to always believe they know better, too.

Hey, it's your choice to have kids and spend all your free time interacting with them. If that works for you, more power to you.

But maybe that doesn't work for everyone? And maybe that's ok too?

about 5 years ago
top

Ted Dziuba Says, "I Don't Code In My Free Time"

kelnos Re:Yeah (619 comments)

That may be the case, but he also comes off as looking down on those of us who do have a personal coding hobby outside of work.

Why do so many people seem to think they've found The One True Way and feel the need to put down people who prefer a different path?

about 5 years ago
top

Ted Dziuba Says, "I Don't Code In My Free Time"

kelnos Re:Ted Dziuba (619 comments)

Your outlier hardly proves that you're more likely, or even equally likely, to find great programmers who don't code outside of work.

about 5 years ago
top

Ted Dziuba Says, "I Don't Code In My Free Time"

kelnos Re:Ted Dziuba (619 comments)

I wouldn't work for someone like you, who expects me to spend all of my free time working without pay.

Way to put words in the guy's mouth.

I enjoy my job in IT and still do plenty of stuff with computers in my free time........but I also do a hell of a lot of things outside of computers in my free time. Sound like you wouldn't hire me just because I date / spend time with friends / play games (video, board, card, anything) / read non-computer books / write / watch movies / exercise / work on my car / etc.

Not sure why you're so pissed; it sounds like you wouldn't be eliminated from consideration based on a hiring filter that culls people who don't do their craft as a hobby too. No one's saying that you have to do it 24/7 or at the exclusion of all other hobbies.

Because I know that in 20 years, you'll be the one burnt out and just wanting to lay down and die

Yes, unfortunately that is one of the dangers of turning a personal hobby into a profession, but some people do manage to do it and are happier for it long term. Don't want to work for someone who prefers people for whom their profession is a hobby? Fine; clearly they don't want to hire you anyway. Everybody's happy in the end.

about 5 years ago
top

Ted Dziuba Says, "I Don't Code In My Free Time"

kelnos Re:Ted Dziuba (619 comments)

Unfortunately you do not usually find out if someone codes in their free time until after you employ them

Why? Seems like a straightforward thing to bring up during an interview.

I have spent many years coding in my free time, but now I have been doing it professionally for several years I rarely find the time. I like to spend my free time doing things I enjoy.

Well, that's the thing. Some people, despite coding professionally, still find coding something they enjoy, and something they feel is worthy of an allocation of personal time. It's all about priorities. You can certainly maintain a career, have a spouse, and take care of your kids with a coding habit. If spending your remaining free time fishing (or whatever) is more important to you than a coding hobby, then that's a choice you've made based on your priorities. But some people actually *do* still like to code after their other obligations are taken care of. I'm not saying you're any less of a coder for that *not* being the case, but I think coding for fun can be a reasonable filter that an employer might use. It may have a higher-than-normal false positive rate (catching good coders such as yourself in its net), but it likely also has a very low false negative rate (not allowing bad coders past the filter).

about 5 years ago
top

Ted Dziuba Says, "I Don't Code In My Free Time"

kelnos Re:he won't be (619 comments)

It comes to preferences. My job is a job. Not a career. Not a stepping stone. Not a direction to a greater path in my field. Once I've reached a particular spot and I'm happy and/or comfortable with it - that's it.

Sure, that's fine. No one's saying it isn't. It's your choice that your work doesn't overlap with your hobbies.

But for some people, they do overlap. While it might be limiting to say, "I won't hire someone who doesn't code in their spare time," it does act as a reasonable filter. I think it's safe to assume that the set of people who do code in their spare time has very few bad programmers in it. The set of people who don't code in their spare time, however, likely has a much larger proportion of bad programmers. (You could also say that the average quality in the codes-for-fun group is likely higher.)

If you have a limited amount of time and energy to deal with hiring, and your applicant pool is large enough, using a "must code for fun" filter saves you some effort by removing a large population of bad (or even just average, probably) programmers. Does that also remove some great programmers from consideration too? Almost certainly... but it's a trade off. It's a filter with a decent number of false positives, but likely very few false negatives.

about 5 years ago
top

Did Chicago Lose Olympic Bid Due To US Passport Control?

kelnos Re:I'm sure it didn't help. (1040 comments)

... a cashier almost told us we were nuts when we paid for ice cream with a $ 100 bill. My impression has become that Americans are much more fond of paying with credit cards than we are in Europe since noone I know thinks it's unusual to have 100-200 euros in your wallet.

It is true that we're pretty fond of paying with CCs, but I think in your case the ice cream vendor was just surprised you didn't have smaller change. Many small vendors (or anyone who sells items of very low value) will not accept bills over $50, or even $20, simply because they don't carry that much change on hand, or are afraid of getting passed counterfeit bills.

Personally I rarely carry around more than $100 in cash on a regular basis, but even if I did, I'd find carrying a $100 bill around to be a nuisance.

about 5 years ago
top

Did Chicago Lose Olympic Bid Due To US Passport Control?

kelnos Re:I'm sure it didn't help. (1040 comments)

You can bounce around Europe crossing borders with little more than a wave of your passport and a friendly nod.

Even less, sometimes. As a US citizen, I once traveled from Munich to Venice by air, and there wasn't anyone at the Venice airport checking passports. I think the flight was treated as the equivalent of a US domestic flight.

about 5 years ago
top

Wii Update 4.2 Tries (and Fails) To Block Homebrew

kelnos Re:Also why are they doing it? (520 comments)

It's likely not to work well for good quality stuff. It can handle DVD and ok-quality divx/xvid standard-def encodes, but the CPU in the Wii is just too slow to play any hi-def content. A 700-ish MHz PPC CPU doesn't get you very far for media playback these days.

Not sure if it's possible to make use of any graphics acceleration hardware to do decoding, but this certainly isn't implemented yet and I don't think anyone's working on it.

about 5 years ago
top

$338M Patent Ruling Against Microsoft Overturned

kelnos Re:Patent (238 comments)

The abstract should be enough and should not make every CIS graduate in the room say "Oh, I can do that. Let me show you how".

"It's easy to implement" isn't a criterion for patent acceptance/rejection.

about 5 years ago
top

New Phoenix BIOS Starts Windows 7 Boot in 1 Second

kelnos Re:BIOS (437 comments)

Well, you can't get to most bootloaders without initializing some hardware, like, say, the disk controller (which presumably requires at least a part of the PCI bus to be initialized). Of course, if you put the bootloader (or even the entire kernel) into the BIOS itself, then it doesn't matter.

about 5 years ago

Submissions

top

kelnos kelnos writes  |  more than 7 years ago

kelnos writes "After more than two years since our previous stable feature release, the Xfce Team is proud to announce the release of Xfce 4.4.0. This release features our new file manager, Thunar, as well as many improvements and feature additions to Xfce's core components.

Head over to our brand-new website and take a look at our visual tour, or go straight to the downloads."

Journals

kelnos has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?