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Your StarCraft II Potential Peaked At Age 24

kenwd0elq Re:In Korea (102 comments)

That would be me. Yup.

5 days ago
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Your StarCraft II Potential Peaked At Age 24

kenwd0elq No Wonder I Stink At SC2... (102 comments)

I love Starcraft; both the original, and StarCraft II. I'm not all that GOOD at it, and now we know why; I'm on the high side of 60. I can still beat the computer, most of the time; I just can't beat the other players! :-)

5 days ago
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UN: Renewables, Nuclear Must Triple To Save Climate

kenwd0elq Re:Only less than 1% (432 comments)

You write: "We trust science because it is self correcting. If it stops being self correcting, or that self correction is delayed by say, 50 years, there is no reason to trust it."

I would go one step further; when it stops being self-correcting, it stops being "science".

about a week ago
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UN: Renewables, Nuclear Must Triple To Save Climate

kenwd0elq Re:Only less than 1% (432 comments)

You write: "...because it is next to impossible to remove all human bias from an experiment." My concern is not that the advocates for anthropogenic global warming (AGW) have tried insufficiently to remove bias, it is the near certainly that the so-called "scientists" have been busy INTRODUCING bias. Not satisfied with merely being wrong, I think they are actively lying.

One of the fundamental principles of experimental science is accurately publishing your methods and your data, to allow other researchers to perform the same or similar experiments and attain the same results. To the extent that methods and data are not shared, it isn't "science".

One other thing; "science" is NEVER EVER "settled". There is always new things to learn, now experiments to be performed, new interpretations to be examined. Once the "science is settled" and no further debate is allowed, it has devolved into a religion. And it is scary how closely the current strident denial of debate in the AGW realm has come to a hunt for heretics to be burned at the stake. Just last week, a "journalist" opined that climate change "deniers" should be imprisoned.

'

about a week ago
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UN: Renewables, Nuclear Must Triple To Save Climate

kenwd0elq Re:Yes, Global Cooling (432 comments)

Anthony Watts of WattsUpWithThat compiled an interesting list of "Global Cooling" references all through the 1970's.

http://wattsupwiththat.com/201...

I may be old, but my memory is still MOSTLY here.....

about a week ago
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UN: Renewables, Nuclear Must Triple To Save Climate

kenwd0elq Re:Fuck this shit! (432 comments)

Hmmm. Are you SURE that "global cooling" and "The Coming Ice Age" weren't all the rage in the late '70's and early '80's? I sure remember a lot of headlines and magazine articles about that. I'm guessing that you weren't around to read those papers and magazines back then and that you get all your news from your iPhone now, but Siri can probably help you look up relevant articles.

about a week ago
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UN: Renewables, Nuclear Must Triple To Save Climate

kenwd0elq Re:Fuck this shit! (432 comments)

WikiPedia may be the wrong thing to point to if you want "scientific journals".

Nor are the real "scientific" journals doing such a wonderful job, either. "Peer review" is a joke, and the track record of scientific journals retracting controversial articles is too long to put much faith in it. The mathematical models cannot predict the present by using inputs from the past. Contra Michael "Chicken Little" Mann, the "Medieval Warm Period _DID_ exist, and his own emails (leaked as part of the HadCRUT archive) prove that he was trying without success to explain it away. Kilimanjaro's snows have not receded. The glaciers in the Himalayas have not disappeared. Billions of people have not starved, nor has Australia been overrun with panicked Malaysians and Indonesians.

I got really suspicious when I saw that the same Socialist/World Government nostrums that Carl Sagan tried to prescribe for Global Cooling in the 1970s were being prescribed now for Global Warming.

My degree is in Physics; I always believe the actual facts. I haven't seen many, and most of them are on the "It's not a problem now, and may never be" side. And if we can only avoid collapsing the world economy with phony scare tactics, the world of 2060 will be rich enough to mitigate what minor effects there may be.

And if Siberia and northern Canada warm up a bit, there will be millions of acres of additional cropland that we can't use now. Maybe that would be a good thing.

about a week ago
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NASA Can't Ethically Send Astronauts On One-Way Missions To Deep Space

kenwd0elq Re:Ethical is irrelevant. (402 comments)

Humans, fickle? Indeed we are! A few years back, I read about some interviews done with people who had survived jumping off the Golden Gate Bridge.

The majority of the sentiments were something like "I had had enough of life, and I had so many problems. But an instant after jumping, I realized that all those problems were solvable, except one - that I had just jumped off the Golden Gate Bridge!"

Yes, at least a few of the people who arrive on Mars, ready to settle and stay, will change their minds. (A fair number of the Mayflower pilgrims voiced similar sentiments.) But the basic idea of going to Mars isn't to set up some tech-free commune - it will be to build the next link in a space-faring civilization, and to create a lifeboat for humanity in case the next rock has our name on it.

Bringing materials back to Earth, from Mars? Not likely; if we wanted to bring raw materials back to Earth, we'd grab them from the asteroid belt so that we wouldn't have to lift them against even Mars' feeble gravity. Mining the Moon may be useful, or at least Harrison Schmidt thinks so, to extract He3 from the lunar dust to be used in fusion powerplants.

about two weeks ago
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NASA Can't Ethically Send Astronauts On One-Way Missions To Deep Space

kenwd0elq Re:Ethical is irrelevant. (402 comments)

Yes, yes, just as Neil Armstrong and Harrison Schmidt returned to Earth. But with any luck, there are people who are alive today who will help to settle the Moon - and die there of old age. Humanity must either continue out to the other planets, and to the planets of other stars, or our race will die here in the cradle of Earth the next time a BIG rock hits the Earth, we will become extinct. I'm a big believer in humanity not becoming extinct.

The ultimate "space exploration is immoral" argument boils down to one of two things. Either you're a coward, and think all humans should be cowards, or you hate humanity and APPROVE of the idea of human extinction. Because if we sit here long enough, it WILL happen. It's a statistical certainty.

The less-sane of the commenters here seem to think that we're about to blast off for Mars tomorrow. It's not going to happen; we don't have any rockets. We can't even send more Americans to the International Space Station, now that NASA has decided to cut off cooperation with the Russians. But by the time we _can_ go to Mars, we'll be ready to live there - for a long time. Will it be ten years? Thirty? Fifty? Hell, I'm astonished that we haven't even been back to the Moon in the last 40 years. We could be on Mars NOW, if we had wanted to, in 1980.

So, let's start NOW. It won't be easy, it won't be cheap, and it won't be entirely safe - but nothing worthwhile ever is. People died learning about electricity. Marie Curie died learning about radium. People died learning how to fly, and people died learning how to dive, and people die every day in learning how to drive. People will die learning how to build lunar habitats, and learning how to land on Mars, and how to build homes there. And a lot more people WON'T die, and we'll learn what we need to know to settle Mars, and to build starships.

And just as it has always done, the knowledge that we gain in doing these things and going those places will make life easier and safer for you cowards who stay behind.

about two weeks ago
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NASA Can't Ethically Send Astronauts On One-Way Missions To Deep Space

kenwd0elq Re:Ethical is irrelevant. (402 comments)

Sorry; my crystal ball is in the shop, so I truly do NOT know what the outcome will be. If yours is in good working order, then visit your stockbroker, and your certainties will carry somewhat more weight. Or at least, your bling will.

Oh, yeah, we're all going to die eventually; that much is certain. But nobody is proposing to send humans as sacrifices to the God of War, or that we're just going there to fertilize the Martian dust. There's a CHANCE of survival beyond the first 72 hours, and probably much longer.

You object? Don't go. It's just that simple. Had an opportunity like this come up 40 years ago, I'd have jumped on it. But they won't be ready to go for several years yet, and I'll be 70 by then; they wouldn't take me.

about three weeks ago
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NASA Can't Ethically Send Astronauts On One-Way Missions To Deep Space

kenwd0elq Re:Ethical is irrelevant. (402 comments)

Does it really matter WHERE you die? If we're in the business of trying to maximize human lifespan, then perhaps we should consider banning skydiving - or at least, base jumping, because THAT crap is DANGEROUS. But we're not going to do that, and we shouldn't be quite so squeamish as writing off any visits to Mars.

Yes, going to the Moon is going to be dangerous, especially when we start setting up lunar colonies. And going to Mars, or the Jovian moons isn't going to be any safer. But then, scuba diving - and even bicycling - causes its own inevitable death toll.

The Roanoke colony vanished without a trace. Something like that is certain to happen to at least one Moon mission, and at least one Mars mission. But when we stop trying to grow, we may as well finish dying. Go ahead - but don't expect me to support that decision.

about three weeks ago
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NASA Can't Ethically Send Astronauts On One-Way Missions To Deep Space

kenwd0elq Re:Ethical is irrelevant. (402 comments)

By your standard, the Plymouth and Jamestown colonies were "suicide missions"; the people who boarded the Mayflower never expected to come back. The first colonists to Mars will never return, and probably wouldn't want to.

But the difference will be, the Martians can phone home pretty easily - where a letter back to England was a rare event in the 1630's.

A "one way" trip isn't necessarily a "suicide mission".

about three weeks ago
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Why Movie Streaming Services Are Unsatisfying — and Will Stay That Way

kenwd0elq Nothing Worth Watching! (323 comments)

The real problem is that there is very little on TV that's worth watching, no matter WHAT the delivery medium is. Dozens of formulaic "crime" dramas. Dozens of unfunny "situation comedies". Every show tries to copy everything else that was ever PREVIOUSLY successful, but the copy is never even half as good as the original.

NOTHING new on TV is worth watching. And I've already seen all the good reruns.

about three weeks ago
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New Information May Narrow Down Malaysian Jet's Path

kenwd0elq Re:CNN's Black Hole theory... (227 comments)

Because it would be funnier if he's mocking the arrogant twits at the end of "Raiders of the Lost Ark" rather than emulating them.

about a month ago
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New Information May Narrow Down Malaysian Jet's Path

kenwd0elq Re:CNN's Black Hole theory... (227 comments)

Sorry; not "brightest minds". The movie quote you're looking for is "We have top men working on this." "Who?" "Top ... Men".

about a month ago
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New Information May Narrow Down Malaysian Jet's Path

kenwd0elq Re:Black box radio beacon ? (227 comments)

Ummmm....... Not necessarily so. Sound under water can be ducted through sound channels and convergence zones. Depending on the depth/pressure, the salinity, and the temperature, faint noises can by heard by a hydrophone hundreds of miles away - but NOT detectable on a hydrophone a half-mile away that isn't at the sound channel depth. (Source: I was an airborne acoustic sensor operator for several years in P-3 Orion ASW aircraft, long long ago). I'm guessing that every US submarine that transits the IO for the next ten years will have secondary tasking to search for MH370.

Of course, if the airplane is on the bottom, in the mud, or in an abyssal trench, the sound could be muffled and not audible even a dozen yards away. Since we have essentially no clue where the airplane is (except that we can be pretty sure it isn't in the "black hole" between Don Lemon's ears) the whole search effort is, essentially, a crap shoot.

We actually had better data on the Air France jet that went down in the Atlantic a few years ago. They eventually recovered the flight data recorders, although it took almost 2 years. But we had a pretty good idea of the track of the aircraft, even though we didn't know WHEN it had gone down.

Here, we can't even be certain that it went down. There are only three good chances for what happened to it. 1) It went down at sea. 2) It crashed into the jungle. Or 3), it landed someplace and is being hidden. The only thing we can be certain of is that it's not flying any longer.

about a month ago
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Lies Programmers Tell Themselves

kenwd0elq EULA (452 comments)

The BIGGEST lie that just about everybody in the country tells;

"I have read and agree with the End User License Agreement"

about a month ago
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Dinosaurs Done In By... Dark Matter?

kenwd0elq Re:Statistical analysis of craters (135 comments)

I was just about to say, "the return of the Nemesis theory", except that "theory" was always too strong a word for that - "conjecture", perhaps.

The idea was that sub-stellar-mass dark companion of the Sun would pass near enough to the Oort cloud to throw a barrage of comets into the inner solar system every 35 million years or so, and that we're just about due. The name of this object would be "Nemesis". (I think Asimov wove that into the end of one of his last stories,,,)

I still like this as a working hypothesis, but I can't really see "dark matter" coming into play - unless the "dark matter" is Jupiter-sized or thereabouts.

about a month and a half ago
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Ask Slashdot: Do You Still Trust Bitcoin?

kenwd0elq Re:Kinda implies (631 comments)

"You can't get your money back from a person who steals your money and buries it at an undisclosed location either."

SURE you can. It just takes 109 years.....

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/new...

about 2 months ago
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Japanese Firm Proposes Microwave-Linked Solar Plant On the Moon

kenwd0elq Re:Why on the Moon? (330 comments)

Besides, it we're going to go to the Moon for power, I think Harrison Schmitt's plan to mine He3 from the surface and ship it back to fuel our fusion powerplants.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

about 2 months ago

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