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Researchers Say the Tech Worker Shortage Doesn't Really Exist

khallow Re:Number of interviews... (359 comments)

Try performing a quick sort, or any high level maths sort in the real world it would take you years to sort that 1000 item list.

Again, you have to adapt the methods to your particular computer. Not all sort algorithms are equal in this regard. It's not that hard to find an O(Nlog(N)) algorithm or hybrid algorithm that works manually.

but I would argue, in this case using a computer that is so fundamentally different will require a complete rewrite and a completely different approach.

That turned out to be false as jbolden demonstrated.

6 hours ago
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Researchers Say the Tech Worker Shortage Doesn't Really Exist

khallow Re:Duh (359 comments)

Transferring your H1B from one employer to another is not hard. Takes about 3 months and about $5000. Just need to find a new employer willing to accept that.

Best example of accidental sarcasm I've seen in a while. This little hurdle is why we call H1-Bs indentured servants.

6 hours ago
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Two Google Engineers Say Renewables Can't Cure Climate Change

khallow Re:If and only if (425 comments)

This is a flawed idea in that just refuses to consider political action in response. When you can't imagine a government putting the externalized costs of fossil fuels on fossil fuel consumers, this conclusion is a natural one.

Sure, we can implement behavior changes via political action. But why should we? Also, fossil fuels also have externalized benefits such as cheaper everything due to lower transportation costs. My view is that there isn't a particularly good reason to act right now. But with a few decades of experience we should be able to tell if global warming is a serious problem or not. That should also give us a good idea how long we can push the various fossil fuel industries and may even obsolete a few of the uses for fossil fuels.

6 hours ago
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Researchers Say the Tech Worker Shortage Doesn't Really Exist

khallow Re:Number of interviews... (359 comments)

Because in the real world people cannot function well at all using the same algorithms as a computer would.

Sorting is not such a problem. And adapting your software algorithms to the needs of your computing system (here you) is a pretty important skill.

9 hours ago
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Researchers Say the Tech Worker Shortage Doesn't Really Exist

khallow Re:Duh (359 comments)

Could you explain, where do you see open job market in the US?

Why don't you explain it since you're the one looking?

9 hours ago
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Researchers Say the Tech Worker Shortage Doesn't Really Exist

khallow Re:Duh (359 comments)

It would also mean that no party has systemic advantages over another, like the indentured servant aspect of H1-Bs.

9 hours ago
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Researchers Say the Tech Worker Shortage Doesn't Really Exist

khallow Re:Duh (359 comments)

So by open market you mean protected local labor market?

Reread the previous post. Nothing about reducing H1-Bs. Maybe that's the end game for the previous poster, but greatly reducing the indentured servitude aspect of an H1-B visa (especially while saying nothing about reducing the number of H1-Bs!) doesn't restrict the labor pool.

9 hours ago
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Researchers Say the Tech Worker Shortage Doesn't Really Exist

khallow Re:Well Duh (359 comments)

Is there a "Well Duh" tag somewhere?

It's like late night informercials. You might see right through this, but someone is buying it.

9 hours ago
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In a Self-Driving Future, We May Not Even Want To Own Cars

khallow Re:In a Self-Driving Future--- (452 comments)

[...] the crash would be listed as "alcohol involved" and "speed related", despite neither of those being the cause.

Neither driver would be intoxicated.

That's a lie. I've not seen anyone state that, and certainly not me.

In my original quote which you first replied to:

If we are still going to have human drivers, then we will need more road capacity, more safety feature, heavier and more expensive cars to withstand accidents, etc.

Moving on:

Most of the rest of us are pointing out the benefit that it will greatly increase road capacity.

Unless it doesn't actually do that.

yesterday
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In a Self-Driving Future, We May Not Even Want To Own Cars

khallow Re:In a Self-Driving Future--- (452 comments)

That's because you can be unsafe and not crash. You are defining "unsafe" as someone who has crashed. Not as someone driving poorly and unsafely.

No, to me "unsafe" means elevated risk of harm from an activity beyond the expectations for that activity. So one important way to study what is unsafe is to look at what sort of groups or behaviors are involved in harmful consequences.

You have very high expectations for risk from automobile accidents, but why should the rest of us share your expectations?

I'll present a US-centric case and examine mortality rates (since those are well documented). If the only way we could die was by accidents or injuries (including suicides and homicides), then we would have an average life expectancy (once you get past the dangerous years of childhood) of almost 1700 years (due to a 60 deaths per 100,000 people in the US). That increases to roughly 2500 years, if we exclude intentional causes of death (40 deaths per 100,000 people). Of this, motor vehicle deaths make up 10.8 deaths per 100,000 people. So if we could eliminate that as a cause of death we'd increase human life expectancy by a considerable amount 300 years for the former case and 800 for the latter.

But we don't live in that sort of world where it makes sense to go hardcore on reducing highway deaths. Instead we live in a world where the US has a death rate of 800 per 100,000 people and even complete elimination of highway deaths won't have much effect on our lifespan since most deaths are due to illnesses that come upon us when we get older.

Second, there is this unwarranted assertion that we can make self-driving vehicles substantially safer than any human driver. You present no argument for this other than to assert that the best of human drivers are "unsafe". However, if that were true, then you would expect that the most unsafe drivers, the drunk drivers and those who who can't maintain a valid driver's license would have a far smaller share of the highway deaths than they actually do. Everyone should be contributing significantly, not just the very worst.

yesterday
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Complex Life May Be Possible In Only 10% of All Galaxies

khallow Re:Let's do the math (281 comments)

Our progression in the last 100 years is more than 1000 fold all previous years combined so imagine what we can do in the next 1000 years.

Will there even be an organism recognizable as human in another 1000 years? There's more than one way for humanity to cease to exist.

yesterday
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In a Self-Driving Future, We May Not Even Want To Own Cars

khallow Re:In a Self-Driving Future--- (452 comments)

The number of unsafe licensed drivers exceeds the number safe human drivers by many orders of magnitudes.

Probably "exceeds" by -90% (yes, negative). I gather somewhere between a third and half of all US highway deaths involve people driving while intoxicated or driving without a valid driver's license. That's not a large portion of the drivers in the US.

Ah, so it's all about having the freedom to drive, not about the number of dead people, safety, efficiency, or the "best" solution. If Khallow can't drive down the road naked, smeared in jello, then it's a bad solution.

Freedom is an important part of that and yes, I do consider safety much less important than freedom. But I also think the safety and lane capacity arguments are way overplayed here.

yesterday
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LinkedIn Study: US Attracting Fewer Educated, Highly Skilled Migrants

khallow Re:Well of course (306 comments)

The other is pure economic pragmatism, such patterns can only work so long before you cut off your feet. They tend to make a few people richer in the short term but as more and more companies/industries do it they start finding their customer base evaporating too, at which point earnings get eaten from the bottom up.

There are two things to note here. First, developed world labor is going to experience that competition no matter what is done. Second, customer base isn't evaporating in the developing world. Those economies are doing just fine.

yesterday
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Prospects Rise For a 2015 UN Climate Deal, But Likely To Be Weak

khallow Re:Er (145 comments)

Climate on the other hand measures changes over vast periods of time, 50 years, 100 years, 10,000 years, etc. Those are easier to guess because they're at a global "macro" level.

And they're harder to guess because one has to wait 50, 100, or 10,000 years to see if the predictions come true. Climate predictions don't suffer from the chaotic behavior of weather, but they do suffer from systemic bias of the climate modelers.

yesterday
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LinkedIn Study: US Attracting Fewer Educated, Highly Skilled Migrants

khallow Re:Well of course (306 comments)

It's not bullshit, but a fact of life. A lot of people have jobs which can be done elsewhere. This entitlement you exhibit doesn't make you any more valuable or make employers pay you more.

yesterday
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Prospects Rise For a 2015 UN Climate Deal, But Likely To Be Weak

khallow Re:Holy Profit (145 comments)

Superfund is actually an example of lack of strong environmental law.

No. Try again. Just because it's not effective in outcome doesn't mean it's not strong environmental law. And once again, this has nothing to do with the status of corporations in the US.

yesterday
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NASA Offering Contracts To Encourage Asteroid Mining

khallow Re:Sigh. Or rather Sci...Fi (152 comments)

So what you're saying is that sci fi writers have not only solved asteroid mining, but also overpopulation and the productive employment of psychopaths. Win-win-win all the way around.

yesterday
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NASA Offering Contracts To Encourage Asteroid Mining

khallow Re:For the novelty! (152 comments)

Every attempt to escape Earth's gravity well, every satellite placed in orbit, every trip to the moon, every science package launched into space, every orbital space station placed in orbit, every lander sent to Mars, and all the other space engineering research and theoretical physics research being conducted by some of the brightest minds on the planet will eventually lead to the new ideas and technologies needed to successfully mine asteroids, colonize the solar system, and expand space exploration.

Unless, of course, it doesn't. I figure most of this tech will have to be reinvented by whoever actually does stuff in space. That means I don't think this stuff is particularly useful in anyone's lifetime, much less our own.

yesterday
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NASA Offering Contracts To Encourage Asteroid Mining

khallow Re:Legal Issue (152 comments)

Why is the US government, through NASA, funding projects to mine asteroids when the legal status of such objects places them in them as international heritage???

There is no such legal status by most of the serious players in space, particularly, the US, Russia, or China.

The bottom line here, this is not something that can be negotiated by governments, each individual has a stake in this.

The individual doesn't have a stake. Possession is nine tenths the law. And there is no legal or power projection infrastructure for the individual to make a claim on any pebbles in space. This type of bullshit claim is easy to handle by just ignoring it.

yesterday
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NASA Offering Contracts To Encourage Asteroid Mining

khallow Re:Funny as hell (152 comments)

Depends how big it is. Small enough and an uncontrolled descent means it burns up uneventfully in the upper atmosphere. Big enough and you just reset human civilization on Earth.

yesterday

Submissions

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Cheap airship sets new record for altitude

khallow khallow writes  |  about 3 years ago

khallow writes "Last weekend, we saw balloons beat records for the highest amateur balloon and longest latex balloon flight by distance and duration, but another record was broken as well. JP Aerospace, a team operating out of Sacramento, California (but supported by members all over the world) launched an operating airship to 95,085 feet (almost 29 kilometers high). Space.com had this to say:



Crewed stations floating high above the Earth with huge balloons could someday act as waypoints for human astronauts headed into space. That's the vision of a DIY space program that has smashed world altitude records by sending a drone airship flying up 18 miles into the sky. The Tandem airship soared almost four miles higher than any past airships during its record-breaking flight on the morning of Oct. 22. Its flight to 95,085 feet above Nevada's Black Rock desert marks a first step toward plans for an "Airship to Orbit" program that would fly humans into space using existing technology.

"The big aerospace firms have been trying to do this for decades, spending hundreds of millions of dollars," said John Powell, president of JP Aerospace. "We've spent about $30,000 and the past five years developing Tandem."

"

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