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Comments

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How much do you spend yearly on mobile apps?

khchung Re:Hard to separate mobile from other apps (240 comments)

I recently bought a $50 app, for a tablet I just bought. Not quite what I would consider mobile. Since it's designed to be used without any sort of wireless connection, not really mobile. the line in this space are blurring quickly.

I, I gots to know ... what kind of mobility app software would cost fifty bucks?

Did you, like many posters above, equated mobile apps == trash in your mind already?

Just TomTom costs like $100, Minecraft is like $7, some dictionaries are like $20, so is XCOM, FF VI is $16. Just browse in the "Top Grossing" chart and you can see the more expensive apps. A $50 app is nothing to be surprised about.

about a week ago
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How much do you spend yearly on mobile apps?

khchung Re:Refuse to be nickel and dimed to death (240 comments)

I don't install apps with in-app purchases just to avoid the whole problem in the first place. I'd rather spend $5 or $10 right up front and get it all than get hooked for free and dribble out $.99 from time to time.

So how much have you paid for $5-10 apps that don't have in-app purchase?

The poll asked for spending on "mobile apps", not restricted to in-app purchase. It is funny too see you automatically assumed it only counts in-app purchase, does that mean you ever only install free apps, so in-app purchase is the only place you had a chance to pay?

There are other posters saying $1 is nothing so they won't even consider paying it. But if $1 really means nothing to them, they got to have bought a few $1 apps already, it costs nothing, right?

For a phone that costs anywhere from $200-600, over 1/2 of the respondents in /. spend less than $10 a year on apps, just goes to show you how worthless it is for app developers to listen to anything /.ers have to say. This isn't where the market is.

about a week ago
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Study: Video Gamer Aggression Result of Game Experience, Not Violent Content

khchung Job experience? (179 comments)

Did the researchers also study aggression that result from job experience?

In my experience, frustration coming from you job is usually many times that which can come from a game, any game.

With a game, you can just give up and play another game if the frustration reached a certain level. With you job, most people don't have that luxury.

about a week ago
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Ask Slashdot: Which NoSQL Database For New Project?

khchung Re:Please specify a better scenario (272 comments)

Based on your information no one can give you solid advice.

IMHO the question is deliberately designed to be vague. iPhones and Android devices, PHP and Ruby On Rails .. that is such a shotgun blast of specifications that are totally unrelated to the DB use on the back end that the entire question smells of click bait to me.

Either that, or the OP simply have no idea how databases work at all.

If OP has any idea how database (any database, not just relational) works, he would be talking about data and transaction volumes, access patterns, transactional requirements, data integrity constraints, retention and housekeeping requirements, etc.

Instead, as you said, he talked about devices platforms, communication protocols, language and runtime environment which are all irrelevant to choosing database. (ok, the last may be a bit relevant depending on which database used)

about a week ago
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Fifty Years Ago IBM 'Bet the Company' On the 360 Series Mainframe

khchung Re:software (169 comments)

Basically, if you're running mainframes, then your business is large enough (heck the individual computers are expensive enough) that you can afford to pay top dollar to motivate some very solid programmers to work for you.

That's your problem right there. Obviously, the unsaid assumption is that, by someone "new", they really mean someone "cheap".

There was never any difficulty in finding motivated and smart people when companies are willing to pay. The problem is most companies are NOT willing to pay.

about two weeks ago
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App Developers, It's Time For a Reality Check

khchung Re:I went for it. (161 comments)

First line of your post:
>I went for it

Following key words:
>give up
>trying
>gambling
>only
>do not spend
>quit

You didn't go for anything, you eyed it and carefully prodded it from a distance with a stick.

Most of us can't even do that, we don't have an extra $100,000 post-safetynet stick that we can burn without consequence.

Not to say your stance is wrong. It would be folly to think that the arena of 21st century business is fair, honest, or viable to commoners. You'll never succeed using the "front door". So throwing in your shirt and sticking your neck out for decks stacked this bad is, as you say, a Bad Idea.

If you're gonna try something New And Exciting don't listen to anyone that won't acknowledge the very real chance of customers/clients/required business relations becoming a very underwhelming turnout. Near-zero return can happen on any maneuver.

-AC.Falos

You know this is the same battle cry for every "aggressively scheduled" death-march project? Old devs like me, who have heard this battle cry more times than I can remember, will recognize it for what it is - B.S.

Gamble is gamble. Sure, someone wins the lottery once in a while, but making a huge gamble is NOT the only way to plan for success.

Your idea is no different from "passionate" execs calling for developers to work 12 hours a day for months because "we can't succeed without giving 120%!"

Sorry, have seen these "aggressive" projects crash and burn too many times (along with the fools who heed the battle cry) to NOT realize this is BS. Successful projects come from careful planning and the discipline in not take too large a bite. I went from one successful project to another, to another, ..., not by gambling big, but by not taking unjustified chances, and always have a fallback plan.

The GP is right on the money. If you ask the founders of any successful startup, chances are they have failed at least once in the past. Only by knowing when to stop can they try again later. If they had insisted on digging themselves deeper in any one of their past failures, chances are they would be able to try again and eventually succeed.

about two weeks ago
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French, Chinese Satellite Images May Show Malaysian Jet Debris

khchung Re:Normal situation (103 comments)

Beyond that, why do ALL the media outlets take government statements such as "possible object", meaning the analysts can't agree that there is an actual thing there and the spot isn't just a light glare, and instead report "it could be a wing". From 'not sure it exists' to 'it could be the plane'.

Cuz that sell eyeballs? Which is more attract to Joe Public - "It could be a wing!" or "Meh, likely nothing found"?

Do you still have that quaint idea that "news" is for informing people and reporters are supposed to be objective and level-headed, or even, (gasp!) competent in subject knowledge being reported? It hasn't been that way for at least decades already.

about three weeks ago
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Google Flu Trends Gets It Wrong Three Years Running

khchung Re:I dn't thin it takes into accout (64 comments)

Exactly, the correct comparison should be "technical analysis" in stock markets, which can be applied to any stock you like with the same level of (un)success.

Without an underlying theory of how things work, which also needs to be somewhat correct, trying to predict future trends simply by using past data is just dumb curve fitting - with a curve of enough degrees of freedom, you can fit any data, but that doesn't mean its prediction would be any better than random guess.

about a month ago
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IBM Begins Layoffs, Questions Arise About Pact With New York

khchung Re:"Protecting jobs" at the expense of what? (182 comments)

So what would be the proper way to deal with countries that subsidize their workforces?

You mean, like providing education, health care, law enforcement, etc to the people, so the "workforce" don't have to pay for private teachers, medicine, or private guards? Or infrastructures like roads, mass transit trains, electricity, clean water, broadband internet, etc, so the workforce don't have to live near the company, buy electric generators, etc? Or lower tax rate, which is effectively higher pay?

Where do you draw the line?

about 1 month ago
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IBM Begins Layoffs, Questions Arise About Pact With New York

khchung Re:"Protecting jobs" at the expense of what? (182 comments)

If IBM employees cannot provide enough economic value to the market for the market to pay the company enough to offset their cost and provide for profits on top of it, then those jobs have no business existing

If companies stop at that, I think most people would be fine with it.

But with the endless chase for ever MORE PROFIT, it is not enough for an employee to generate enough value to offset their own cost + profit, they have to generate more value than their hypothetical offshore counterpart.

So if you cost $100 and generate $120 value, but the other guy in India cost $20 and generated only $25, well, the company can hire 5 India guy to generate $125 for the same cost of $100, so bye bye to your job.

YOU would think that the guy in India is crap, producing only $25 value, less than a quarter of yours, but you are in fact competing with 5 of them, which combined to give more value to the company than you could!

about 1 month ago
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IBM Begins Layoffs, Questions Arise About Pact With New York

khchung Re:IBM is not a great place to work. (182 comments)

They're constantly looking to move jobs from areas of relatively high pay (USA, England, Australia, etc.) to areas of relatively low pay (India, Philippines, China, etc.) Which is all well and good if the standard of work were maintained - but it's not. They pay peanuts, and they get monkeys - I've worked with some fantastically competent people from India and China, but the salary they'd command back home is more than IBM is prepared to pay.

THIS is the reason offshoring will never give you good results, NOT because of some inherent incompetence of the people in the other country, but because the company is unwilling to pay for good talent!

I have seen this mentality more than I cared to - "offshoring is to cut cost, so we can't pay enough for qualified people!"

I mean, this is CRAZY. All businesses complained about the difficulty in finding talent. Considering that the USA (for example), is only about 5% of world's population, while India and China combined have like 40%, even if the portion of qualified people in those 2 countries are just 1/10 compared to the US, it would mean, but raw numbers, there are almost (80%) just as many qualified people there as in the US!

But of course, being talented as they are (and 10x as rare in their country compared to as in the US), they would command a higher pay relative to their countries average worker, but that "higher" pay would still be significantly LESS than what the same qualified staff in US would be taking.

It would still be a win-win situation, to have a bigger talent pool, just as highly qualified staff, etc, etc. But NO, offshore is a LOW COST resource pool, we CAN'T pay anyone that much more than the average salary! Yeah, the insanity of HR everywhere, we pay the average salary but want the top-tiered employees, and only those with passion, too!

about 1 month ago
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Ask Slashdot: Why Are We Still Writing Text-Based Code?

khchung Re:if you "get coding" so well, why arent you codi (876 comments)

A better representation would be me speaking these phrases to you in person

So, essentially the same TEXT in audio format? Doesn't that simply proved the point that the TEXT is already the, conceivably, most concise and precise representation of your idea?

I've work in visual coding for over a decade (in an integration middleware product line named 'webMethods', that uses a graphical language named 'Flow', Owner: 'Software AG'). Its based on Java, its been successful for the almost the last 2 decades. I've had a job in it for 13 years.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/W...

And yes, I have used and taught other people to use webMethods in the past, over 10 years ago when it was still "new".

It might be "successful" in the sense that the company is financially successful. But "successful" in the sense it lets you program better than text? Only if you consider taking 5-10 times as long write the same logic compared to writing plain text in Java as "better". Good luck trying to debug a program from its visual representation.

People who learned webMethods before learning Java have trouble understanding basic concepts as exception handling, and have even more trouble with OO concepts such as polymorphism, or even basic Objects, as they cannot see the objects in the visual representation of the logic flow.

about 2 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Why Are We Still Writing Text-Based Code?

khchung Re:It's because you get bogged down (876 comments)

So-called "visual programming", which is what you're wanting, is great for relatively simple tasks where you're just stringing together pre-defined blocks of functionality.

THIS. The same reason why picture books only works for story for pre-school kids.

When the thought one wish to express reaches a certain level of complexity, it went beyond what a 2D image can express.

about 2 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Why Are We Still Writing Text-Based Code?

khchung Re:if you "get coding" so well, why arent you codi (876 comments)

Nah, I'm actually with the poster. I get text-based traditional coding too, but find the ROI (time and effort) quite poor and the work dreary. You have to be either well disciplined, or get the sort of joy banging out code that running get when pushing their body through the next mile.

So one can get 'coding', or get 'running', but find themselves searching for something better. (visual coding/visual abstractions swimming)

Ok, I suppose you also "get" English writing. How about, as an exercise, show us a "better" visual depiction of your own post above without using text?

Or how about the OP posting his question visually using a picture?

Can't do that? Perhaps text IS a very good way to express thought and logic? Good luck on your search for something "better" (whatever that means), the past 2 decades have already been littered with numerous carcasses of "visual programmer" tools that can't do the job.

about 2 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Why Are We Still Writing Text-Based Code?

khchung Re:if you "get coding" so well, why arent you codi (876 comments)

You may believe that you 'get code'. But clearly you do not.

This was also my first thought when reading the summary. His question already proved that he doesn't "get code" at all. \

about 2 months ago
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Why Project Flare Might Just End the Console War

khchung Re:IMO, it is not going to work (166 comments)

>How about 100% cheat prevention? When all the computing is done centrally, how could you possibly cheat in the game anymore?
Most games have all, or nearly all, of the processing happening on the server as it is. Doesn't stop cheaters. Sure, they can't exactly just memory edit the amount of gold/points/health/whatever they have anymore, but there are an infinite number of other ways to cheat. Think about botters; that doesn't rely on client-side processing. Aimbots in FPS games do not need to rely on client-side processing (from the game, anyways) either; they will detect enemies and simulate mouse movement to auto-aim.

Think again. When all processing is done in the server and only the screen is sent to the client, wall hack becomes impossible. Aimbot? Your aimbot better be able to identify an opponent's head from the displayed graphics. Not the say that's as difficult as in doing so in real video footage, but it raised the bar so high, that anyone able to pull that off would be quite an expert in pattern and facial recognition, and not just a matter of finding the coordinate for the opponent's location in the data stream.

>Plus, it totally eliminated the lag factor in FPS, as only the central server do the processing and rendering. Rubberbanding and blinking/shifting enemies will be eliminated.
No it doesn't. In fact, it's going to make it worse. It might *look* different, but the actual effect will be more detrimental to your gameplay. If you have issues with lag with a very, very low amount of information being transferred (ie. position updates), then what the fuck makes you think upping it to uncompressed 1080p video streaming is going to improve it? Instead, it'll be like trying to watch a Youtube video that is constantly trying to buffer. Even if, and I stress "if," it were to stream halfway decently for you, you are still going to be feeling the effects of the lag. Everything will feel sluggish and the controls will always seem to trigger actions that happen much later than when you pressed the button.

You assumed current technology for streaming video is the only solution. But given that the server had all the original 3D information to generate the video frame to begin with, many other techniques becomes available. E.g. Regardless of resolution, the server can just send the polygons need to be drawn to the client side for a frame, and then the changes for the next frame, etc. Which would reduce the data size tremendously. Instead of 1920x1080x24 bits = ~6MB a frame, the position of 10 thousand vertices will only take ~40KB assuming 4 bytes each. Textures can be stored locally, then the 100KB from the server could give enough information to the client to render the image.

As for the control latency, it is there in current FPS anyway, it's just a matter of how well the game masks it. Actually, it is worse in the current FPS, as my movement really have to make it, not only the first hop to the server, but make one more hop to my opponent's machine for me to avoid getting hit from his POV.

If you played FPS then you will know about turning a corner to hide, only 2 seconds later to have the game tell you that you actually got hit and killed before you turned that corner, because your opponent lagged so badly he didn't get the data of your movement until after he already shot you.

>With only 1 copy of the world, then the number of players will only be limited by the number of CPU doing rendering from the POV of each player, and that is probably easier to scale as the rendering process is read-only. So you can have MASSIVE number of players in the same game, imagine hundreds of player all in the same battlefield, and that limit can be increased by a server upgrade instead of waiting 5 years for another console generation.
This can already be done and it does not need that the video output be rendered on the server which requires even more massive servers.

This can already be done?? Which FPS running on console give you games with 100+ players in it?

about 5 months ago
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Why Project Flare Might Just End the Console War

khchung Re:Console DRM? (166 comments)

Imagine your game not starting because the 'physics' servers are down or you can't connect to them.....

And how is that different from how I cannot play multiplayer BF3 on PS3 when EA's or Sony's servers are down?

Some games are intended to be multiplayer only, you can't play them when the server is down anyway.

about 5 months ago
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Why Project Flare Might Just End the Console War

khchung Re:IMO, it is not going to work (166 comments)

Why to spend power in datacenters when people can use it at home? Other than vendor-lock, is non-sense. Another thing is how scalabe the thing is, etc.

How about 100% cheat prevention? When all the computing is done centrally, how could you possibly cheat in the game anymore?

Plus, it totally eliminated the lag factor in FPS, as only the central server do the processing and rendering. Rubberbanding and blinking/shifting enemies will be eliminated.

The only lag now comes between your end to the server, which, while non-zero, is at least consistent from game to game.

With only 1 copy of the world, then the number of players will only be limited by the number of CPU doing rendering from the POV of each player, and that is probably easier to scale as the rendering process is read-only. So you can have MASSIVE number of players in the same game, imagine hundreds of player all in the same battlefield, and that limit can be increased by a server upgrade instead of waiting 5 years for another console generation.

Aren't these reasons good ones?

about 5 months ago
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Snowden Used Social Engineering To Get Classified Documents

khchung Re:Fire them (276 comments)

This is the content of every single (mandatory) security training I've been required to take, over the years. It just seems unbelievable to me, that various government agencies spend so much money in this training, and developing strong security practices, that the NSA, of all agencies, would not be following these procedures.

Maybe, as above posts illustrated, they have heard about Terry's case? Better to have a security breach, and even get fired, because you made such a common mistake, than to refuse and go to jail.

about 5 months ago
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A Math Test That's Rotten To the Common Core

khchung Re:How hard can that possibly be? (663 comments)

Then just ask "what is 6 minus 5". Why make the question ridiculous?

Because "6 minus 5" is too difficult for the teacher writing the test.

about 5 months ago

Submissions

khchung hasn't submitted any stories.

Journals

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Port mapping in Planet VRT-311S router

khchung khchung writes  |  more than 8 years ago

I bought a Planet VRT-311S router a while ago, and it took me some time to get the port mapping configured properly to make Azureus working properly.

The port mapping setting is not intuitive, there is no "port mapping" option in the admin manual. The "Virtual Server" option only has a few applications listed with no button to add new services.

I am writing this down in case I need to do this again. If anyone know an easier way, please let me know. This only works for fixed IP PCs on the lan.

The way to do it is through the "Firewall Rules" option. But first, you have to add the ports to the Security--Services option. Open the Security dropdown and select the Services option, enter the name such as "BT", select Type as "TCP/UDP", enter 6881 in both Start Port and Finish Port, click "Add".

Then go to the "Firewall Rules", select "WAN=>LAN", click "Add". Give a name like "BT", Source IP is "Any", Dest IP as "Single address", enter the client PC's internal IP (e.g. 192.168.0.10), Service is "BT (TCP/UDP:6881)", Action is "Forward" then click "Save".

Now, strangely, the "BT" service will appear in the "Virtual Servers" as "*BT", and correctly mapped to the designated PC.

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