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Bitcoin Plunges after Mt. Gox Exchange halts trades

krakman krakman writes  |  about 8 months ago

krakman (1121803) writes "From Bloomberg...
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/...

Bitcoin plunged more than 8 percent today after a Tokyo-based exchange halted withdrawals of the digital currency, citing technical malfunction.

Mt. Gox, claimed in a blog post it needed to “temporarily pause on all withdrawal requests to obtain a clear technical view of the currency processes.” It promised an “update” — not a reopening — on Monday, Feb. 10, Japan time.

This is day after Russia's Prosecutor General concluded Bitcoin and other digital currencies are illegal under current law."

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Worse then NSA? France Broadens Its Surveillance Power with wider scope then NSA

krakman krakman writes  |  about 10 months ago

krakman (1121803) writes "With the NSA disclosures, French media was 'outraged'. Yet they appear to be worse then the NSA, with a new law that codifies standard practice and provides for no judicial oversight while allowing electronic surveillance for a broad range of purposes, including “national security,” the protection of France’s “scientific and economic potential” and prevention of “terrorism” or “criminality.” ( NYTIMES article: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/15/world/europe/france-broadens-its-surveillance-power.html )

The government argues that the law, passed last week with little debate as part of a routine military spending bill, which takes effect in 2015, does not expand intelligence powers. Rather, officials say, those powers have been in place for years, and the law creates rules where there had been none, notably with regard to real-time location tracking.

French intelligence agencies have little experience publicly justifying their practices. Parliamentary oversight did not begin until 2007.

The Association des Services Internet Communautaires, or @sic, an advocacy group whose members include AOL, eBay, Facebook, Google, Microsoft and several top French Internet companies, discovered the new legislation essentially by chance.

“There was no consultation at all,” said Giuseppe de Martino, @sic’s director and an executive at Dailymotion, a French online video service. “No one said anything about it to us.”"

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NSA has no clue as to scope of SNOWDON file copy, amnesty for unpublished docs?

krakman krakman writes  |  about 10 months ago

krakman (1121803) writes "In a NY Times article ( http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/15/us/officials-say-us-may-never-know-extent-of-snowdens-leaks.html) a 6 month internal investigation has not been able to define the actual files that Edward Snowdon had copied.

There is a suspicion that not all the documents have been leaked to newspapers, and a senior NSA official (Rick Ledgett), who is heading the security agency’s task force examining Mr. Snowden’s leak, has said on the record, that he would consider recommending amnesty for Mr. Snowden in exchange for those unleaked documents.

The investigation managed to reveal so far, that Snowdon hacked firewalls and used coworkers security credentials to gain systemwide access.

“They’ve spent hundreds and hundreds of man-hours trying to reconstruct everything he has gotten, and they still don’t know all of what he took,” a senior administration official said. “I know that seems crazy, but everything with this is crazy.”

That Mr. Snowden was so expertly able to exploit blind spots in the systems of America’s most secretive spy agency illustrates how far computer security still lagged years after President Obama ordered standards tightened after the WikiLeaks revelations of 2010."

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Insight on FBI hacking team ops from Washington Post

krakman krakman writes  |  about 10 months ago

krakman (1121803) writes "A very interesting story on how the background to how the FBI can investigate and get details from computers over the net, without knowing anything about the computer location. Not from some conspiracy rag, but Washington Post regarding FBI "network investigative techniques":

"The man who called himself “Mo” had dark hair, a foreign accent and — if the pictures he e-mailed to federal investigators could be believed — an Iranian military uniform. When he made a series of threats to detonate bombs at universities and airports across a wide swath of the United States last year, police had to scramble every time.

Mo remained elusive for months, communicating via e-mail, video chat and an Internet-based phone service without revealing his true identity or location, court documents show. So with no house to search or telephone to tap, investigators turned to a new kind of surveillance tool delivered over the Internet." ..."

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CNN is using subliminal advertising?

krakman krakman writes  |  more than 7 years ago

krakman writes "CNN has subliminal Advertising? I just got a email from a friend who said she was watching CNN over her DVR and had a clip that showed CNN's subliminal advertising. She uploaded the clip to youtube, and I extracted the frame, (go to http://brainwashingbycnn.blogspot.com/ to check it out) Innocent mistake by CNN or bigger plot to brainwash us...... I look forward to comments...."
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