Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Raspberry Pi vs. Cheap Android Dongle: Embarrassment of (Cheap) Riches

kroyd Re:If it doesn't run XBMC... (233 comments)

XBMC runs very badly on Allwinner A10 and A13 CPUs found in the MK802, since the stock Android they come with don't support the regular hardware accelration in Android. (I imagine this has something to do with licensing and patents.)

There has been some work in making XBMC work better, but that requires flashing your own ROM file, and that can be a really big pain with the extremely cheap but really unsupported systems.. (See http://www.cnx-software.com/2012/11/12/xbmc-for-linux-on-allwinner-a10-devices-it-works-sort-of/ for an example of how to make it work.)

The devices usually come with a custom video player which works really well (the MALI GPU is quite powerfull), and I believe the youtube app has also been optimized. Hopefully the producers of the cheap Android sticks and tablets can work together with the XBMC team - the market must be enormous.

about 2 years ago
top

Microsoft-Built Smartphone Could Irritate Hardware Partners, Harm Nokia

kroyd Will they re-use the Kin brand? (100 comments)

I'm sure lots of people here remembers the previous Microsoft produced phone, the Microsoft Kin series of phones. After all, they lasted all, oh, 4 weeks? 40 days? Something like that.

There is probably a lot of "slack" in the Windows 8 phone pricing as well - if the Windows RT "OEM license fee" is 80-95$, the Phone OS OEM price can't be far off. I'm sure Nokia, HTC and Samsung won't mind if they've got to add an extra 80$ in cost for each phone they produce which Microsoft doesn't have to worry about..

about 2 years ago
top

Will Your Next iPhone Be Built By Robots?

kroyd Foxconn is Taiwanese - the "other China" (251 comments)

.. and the robots will be be located in Taiwan, at least for now: http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-57318260-1/foxconn-to-build-taiwan-robot-kingdom/

Sure, it is possible that they will start building mainly robot based factories in mainland Chinal, but why bother? In its purest form a robot factory would just take raw materials and energy as input, with product as output. You want to place a factory like that in a location with a really stable energy supply, good infrastructure, and a stable political situation. Staff costs wouldn't be such a big issue, since you wouldn't have too many staff anyway. So, why choose China, where you would have to deal wiith rampant corruption, bad infrastructure and millions of starving former factory workers?

Personally I would put the factories in Japan, northern Europe and Canada, that way they would be closer to the consumers as well. It would certainly save a fortune in security!

about 2 years ago
top

Ask Slashdot: What Distros Have You Used, In What Order?

kroyd MMC-SLS-Slackware-RedHat-OpenSUSE-Ubuntu (867 comments)

MMC was one of the first distributions - I distinctly remember writing the floppies using DOS, it took something like 15 minutes per floppy, as they were written byte-by-byte, not fancy block-by-block as the young folks are using these days :P

After MMC I switched to SLS, then Slackware, RedHat (bought on those really cheap CDs you could order online), OpenSUSE, finaly Ubuntu.

The biggest change is probably that for the last couple of years all my networking equipment runs some version of Linux, my phone (Android), hell, even my DSLR runs Linux (http://www.sony.net/Products/Linux/DI/SLT-A55.html). This has not been a conscious choice by me btw, but it seems Linux really is everywhere these days.

about 2 years ago
top

Leak Hints Windows 8 Tablets May Be Dearer Than Makes Sense

kroyd The OEM price of Windows RT is probably 85$ (365 comments)

Since it hasn't been mentioned: http://www.tomshardware.com/news/Windows-RT-OEM-ARM-85-Nvidia,15992.html

It is not too strange that you end up with an end-user price of 600$ - the 85$ should be added to the component cost, which is what, 150$ for a tablet of this class? Basically Microsoft adds at least 50% to the base cost of the device, all other costs comes on top of that.

Google gives away Android for free, so you end up with 49.99$ tablets on Alibaba. (I should get one of those in the mail this week - looking forward to taking it apart). Apple probably does something similar, but then they're not really aiming for the cost-conscious part of the market.

about 2 years ago
top

Ask Slashdot: IT Contractors, How's Your Health Insurance?

kroyd Re:Best plan? (468 comments)

If you're self-employed, and plan to stay so, it is nearly impossible, as far as I know there are no "bring so-so-and so much money / create this many jobs" exemptions in any Scandinavian country.

What you can do is to get hired by a company, in which case it is just a couple of forms to fill out for the company in question [*], or get married.

*: This assumes that you've got some "valuable skills", and that you'll be able to make a livelihood here.

more than 2 years ago
top

Why Intel Needs Smartphones More Than They Need Intel

kroyd The first Intel based smartphone launched in 1996 (134 comments)

And, it used an Intel 386 cpu: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nokia_9000_Communicator. It was probably one of the most brick-like GSM phones ever.

Later Nokia switched to AMD for their 9100, then to ARM for the 9210 series. I bought a 9201i in 2002, I believe I paid t something like 1500usd..

There were also a few Japanese intel based phones, but those ran Windows XP.. Not really what I would call a smart phone. So, it might be correct to say that this is the "first Intel based smart-phone which might launch in the US".

more than 2 years ago
top

White House Opposes Key SOPA Provisions

kroyd Re:Dupe (175 comments)

Or, if you pay a bit of attention: The indefinite detention paragraphs are most likely illegal under the US constitution. By noting his reservations the comming court cases (appeals all the way up to the supreme court) will be quite a bit simpler. After all, it is the executive branch (where the president is), which has to prosecute in favour of the law, and the president stating reservations is a boon to any defense attorney. This is obvious, and has been covered in the news, but hey, most people complaning doesn't seem to know what the NDAA act really is.
The court cases, in case you don't know, will be judged by the judiciary part of the US system. Of course, if you and the republicans get their way the next president will be a republican, and the one or two new supreme court justices which will be appointed in the next presidential period will be really, really conservative. Then, the indefinite detention will most likely become law.
I'm not an American, but this should be obvious even with the most cursory glance.

more than 2 years ago
top

Microsoft Buying Skype for $8.5B

kroyd Re:two words.... (605 comments)

That is unlikely, as the P2P technology that Skype is built on is licensed from Joltid (a company owned by the Skype founders - google Joltid and lawsuit).

The only thing that Microsoft is buying (as far as I can see) are a lot of users, a license for some P2P software, and some video chat software which pretty much duplicates what Microsoft already has.

more than 3 years ago
top

Steve Jobs: 'We Don't Track Anyone'

kroyd The real problem with iPhone tracking (373 comments)

It used to be that for someone else to get a log of where you've been in a given time period the police would have to ask the telecoms for their logs. (One can argue about how easy it is to get those logs, but the fact remains: It is not something everyone can get hold of.)

The iPhone log changes all of this. If you get your phone from your employer the employer has access to (and probably the right to) this information. It is not just access to your phone, but imagine you've synced your personal iPhone with a company computer at any time? Or what if it not your employer, but your (ex) husband's computer? Also, it is much easier for a lawyer in a civil case to request the information, as they don't have to involve the telecom as a part. Or what if you're a foreigner simply crossing the border to the USA? (Clearly, there are US government agencies who would love to get position tracking of every single iPhone owner who crosses the US border.)

It doesn't really matter how exact the information is, the point is that this is a change in how easily accessible the information is, and who can can access it.

more than 3 years ago
top

Linux May Need a Rewrite Beyond 48 Cores

kroyd Large linux systems today have 3072 processors (462 comments)

(or more, probably)

http://lkml.org/lkml/2010/7/22/252 is a fun post on the Linux-Kernel list about missing caching of ACPI tables leading to 20 minute boot times. I get that problem every day! (I wish :P)

It is a pretty safe bet that you don't have to worry about Linux and more than 48 cores, as it is the OS of choice for a lot of the top supercomputers and OS research in general. Of course, applications which can take advantage of such systems is another problem, but that is hardly a Linux problem.

more than 3 years ago
top

Tunneling Under the Great Firewall?

kroyd Here is a good test for the "obey the law" crowd (403 comments)

The F scale.

I've traveled in China several times, and as a "rich white guy" you won't have serious problems even if you make loud political statements that the party disagrees with. (E.g. here is a short list of forbidden words).

What you should be careful about is discussing politics with the locals. At worst you'll be asked to leave the country, but they can be thrown in jail or "disappeared" if they say, criticize party leaders.

In other words, using a ssh proxy is fine. There is probably even no law against it, except for the general "don't do things not in the interest of the Party".

more than 4 years ago
top

Apple Announces iPhone 4

kroyd Re:One more thing... (1184 comments)

Mobile videoconferencing is great for deaf people, as they can use sign language. (This is the only use of videoconferencing I've observed after quite a few years of pretty common availability here in northern Europe)

more than 4 years ago
top

Fragmentation vs. Obsolescence In the Android Ecosphere

kroyd iPhone fragmentation (315 comments)

I've got an 2G iPod touch, with iPhone OS 2.x. This means there is software that simply won't run because it is not an iPhone (such as Sleep Cycle), and software which won't run because it is not the 3.x version of the OS (games - at least the Street fighter demo and some others). With an iPod Touch you have to buy the OS upgrades, which I haven't bothered to do.

By this summer you'll have to support the 1G, 2G and 3G versions of the iPod touch, the 1G, 2G and 3G iPhones, the 3G iPhone with more RAM and a faster processor, and the 4G iPhone with both more RAM and a higher resolution. Oh, and the iPad of course.

The biggest new challenge with "iphone 4g" is the higher resolution - some say this will be 960x640 (i.e 2x the current resolution hor/ver), which is imho unlikely as this would be the first use of such a LCD resolution ever.

To me this doesn't sound simpler than the Android fragmentation, at least with Android the market lets you know which apps you can install, and the vast majority actually works with 1.5. With the Appstore you might only get "oh, don't install this on an iPod touch, it won't work".

Android is also more developer friendly, e.g. the new feature introduced just before the 2.2 release - at least my N1 got a "report this crash button" before I upgraded to 2.2. (I don't want to speculate on the developer friendlyness of Apple, but recent news haven't been very good.

more than 4 years ago
top

The Shortcomings of Google's Open Handset Alliance

kroyd There is already fragmentation on the iPhone (208 comments)

I've got an 2G iPod touch, with iPhone OS 2.x. This means there is software that simply won't run because it is not an iPhone (such as Sleep Cycle), and software which won't run because it is not the 3.x version of the OS (games - at least the Street fighter demo). With an iPod Touch you have to buy the OS upgrades, which I haven't bothered to do.

By this summer you'll have to support the 1G, 2G and 3G versions of the iPod touch, the 1G, 2G and 3G iPhones, the 3G iPhone with more RAM and a faster processor, and the 4G iPhone with both more RAM and a higher resolution. Oh, and the iPad of course.

The biggest new challenge is the higher resolution - some say this will be 960x640 (i.e 2x the current resolution hor/ver), which is imho unlikely as this would be the first use of such a LCD resolution ever.

To me this doesn't sound simpler than the Android fragmentation, at least with Android the market lets you know which apps you can install, with the Appstore you might only get "oh, don't install this on an iPod touch, it won't work".

I would be more interested in articles comparing the wave of 100$/100euro Android tablets which will arrive this summer..

more than 4 years ago
top

WhiteHouse.gov Releases Open Source Code

kroyd Re:Are you f_cking kidding me? (161 comments)

Whitehouse.gov is mirrored through akamai (netcraft).

Transparent mirroring is of course only one way among many to use drupal (or any other cms) securely. It is my impression that the current US administration actually allows hiring someone with a higher IQ than the president, so someone probably did a google search.

more than 4 years ago
top

Why Linux Is Not Attracting Young Developers

kroyd Didn't I read this 10 years ago? (742 comments)

Browsing through this thread I can't help but recognise the same old arguments: "It is too hard to use for casual users", "it is no fun", "windows is good enough", "developers want to make money", "the gui is ugly" and so on. These arguments are not new, you would find the exact same arguments if you look at old slashdot stories.

The reality is (as usual) quite different, and the old arguments have nothing to do with the kernel anyway. Look at the latest statistics of who actually writes the kernel: http://www.linuxfoundation.org/publications/whowriteslinux.pdf. From this paper it is clear that the rate of changes has increased quite a bit, and that the latest Linux release probably had something like 1800 different contributors. If you go back 5 years that number is just 400, so the assumption that there are "no new developers" is clearly false. What the first article is really about is that there are "no new subtree maintainers", but that should hardly surprise anyone. The Linux kernel is a huge pyramid (similar to a big corporation in a way), the people on the bottom of the pyramid are not the ones who get sent to the kernel summit, and the people on the top tend to like it there. I doubt that the _average_ age of all the Linux kernel developers have changed all that much in the last 5 years, it might even have gone down a bit, as more of the development is done in China, Japan and India these days.

Linux on the desktop might not be growing as quickly as some might hope, but it keeps growing faster and faster in almost every other market segment. When was the last time you heard about a new mobile phone, set-up box, web-service or computer science project which was not based on Linux? Sure, Microsoft and Apple might launch their new products now and then, but they are tiny compared to the rest of the market.

more than 4 years ago

Submissions

kroyd hasn't submitted any stories.

Journals

kroyd has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?