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Russia May Be Planning National Space Station To Replace ISS

kyrsjo Re:Why such a short lifetime ? (225 comments)

I would say that recently, Russia are even worse of playing well with others...

2 days ago
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GTK+ Developers Call For Help To Finish Cross-Platform OpenGL Support

kyrsjo Re:help them (89 comments)

Yeah. Ususally the only bad thing is some warnings in the terminal that "XX is depreciated"

about a week ago
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GTK+ Developers Call For Help To Finish Cross-Platform OpenGL Support

kyrsjo Re:Simple and stupid question (89 comments)

Agreed. At least pyGTK is very straight-forward to use, even for someone like me with little GUI programming experience. I can't really speak for QT tough.

about a week ago
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Creationism Conference at Michigan State University Stirs Unease

kyrsjo Re:It makes you uneasy? (1007 comments)

I have no problem criticizing Islam, for much of the same reasons as Christianity: Hiding behind a "holy book" which cannot be questioned instead of using the brain the FSM gave you, and applying this nonsense inconsistently and illogically. Basically, using it as a justification which cannot be questioned, but can be applied to any situation.

However, discussing something with people which generally agree with you gets old quickly, so why bother. Since this is a tech site: Imagine 10 people sitting in a room, some using Mac and some using Linux, discussing how badly Windows sucks, everybody nodding at the others comments. That sounds like a really boring discussion to me...

Oh, and get an account FFS.

about three weeks ago
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Creationism Conference at Michigan State University Stirs Unease

kyrsjo Re:It makes you uneasy? (1007 comments)

Says the AC :)

about three weeks ago
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Creationism Conference at Michigan State University Stirs Unease

kyrsjo Re:It makes you uneasy? (1007 comments)

The Muslims I know are yet to kill me over disagreeing with their religion - they seem to be more interested in meeting up for some (pork-free) food and board games :)

Anyway, the point was really that "you shouldn't criticize X because I think Y is worse" is stupid logic - by that logic, why are you buying Christmas (or Yule, as we call it where I'm from) gifts when there are children starving in the world?

about three weeks ago
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Creationism Conference at Michigan State University Stirs Unease

kyrsjo Re:It makes you uneasy? (1007 comments)

(1) That's a horrible and extremely incorrect generalization. Both groups are composed of people, some which are usually nice, some which are often not. Your statement is not just overly broad, it is obviously false.

(2) My point was that I am free to criticize any religion I want, no matter what you or Bartles find more important. To make an example from a different field (which you maybe understand better): Hypothetically, do you think I should refrain from criticizing the faults of Gnome 3, just because because Crazy Taco think Windows 8 is much worse? From my perspective, I don't use Windows, so it affects me less, I know it less, and I find the discussion about Windows boring. So I rather talk about the problems and their possible solutions of Linux.

about three weeks ago
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Creationism Conference at Michigan State University Stirs Unease

kyrsjo Re:It makes you uneasy? (1007 comments)

I criticize Christianity more than, say, Islam, because there are more Christians around me than there are Muslims. I find it more interesting and relevant to discuss phenomena inside my own culture than phenomena further removed, affecting me less.

about a month ago
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Could We Abort a Manned Mission To Mars?

kyrsjo Re:Second the recommendation (267 comments)

Agreed, it's a good book, and one that seems to get most of the technicalities right. The thing which bothers me the most is the authors very flat and sometimes a bit boring writing style - there is a lot of "I did this, and then that happened. Then I did something else, and exactly the same thing happened again. Then I tried something completely different, got a bit lucky, and now it worked. Yay.". The same goes for the characters - with some exceptions for the main character, they are all very much portraid as "cardboard cutouts".

about 2 months ago
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Users Report Warping of Apple's iPhone 6 Plus

kyrsjo Re:Curved Phones (421 comments)

But seriously, the blended edges do look a lot like my Samsung (which does not bend). Given that Apple had a case with "rectangle with rounded corners", Samsung may have a case with "thin rectangle with blended edges".

about 2 months ago
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CERN Tests First Artificial Retina Capable of Looking For High Energy Particles

kyrsjo Re:Summary is completely misleading (60 comments)

The algorithm combines data from several sensors.

about 2 months ago
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CERN Tests First Artificial Retina Capable of Looking For High Energy Particles

kyrsjo Re:What about the US of A? (60 comments)

Quite a few US universities are heavily involved in CERN. And European universities. And Russian. And to an increasing amount, Chinese. And also many others.

The people "teaching" (implying that there is something worthwhile to learn) creationism, are not scientists - they are coming up with neither new data or reasonable interpretations. So thus no US scientists are "teaching" that steaming pile of poo.

As a European, it would be great if /. would stop descending into the "USA sucks" vs "Muh freeduuum units and muh F-150" idiot-fight it often does :/ It used to be a nice place...

about 2 months ago
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CERN Tests First Artificial Retina Capable of Looking For High Energy Particles

kyrsjo Re:Summary (60 comments)

> and they probably buy them fpga's and boards in industrial quantities anyway
Njaaa. Define "industrial quantities". Mostly I've seen people use a few 10s of them, not 100s or 1000s.

The really expensive part about ASICs are to make the masks for lithography etc., not how many chips you make. Thus you don't want to make a new chip unless you *really* need to.

about 2 months ago
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CERN Tests First Artificial Retina Capable of Looking For High Energy Particles

kyrsjo Re:Summary (60 comments)

FPGAs are very different beasts from normal CPUs - as far as I understand, they are very well suited to doing relatively simple tasks ridiculously fast, and one chip can treat tons of data in parallel. However, they do not do so well on really complex algorithms, algorithms requiring lots of fast memory and branches, and they are harder to program than CPUs.

In this case, I would think each cell cell in the (m,q) parameter space is handled by one "block" of the FPGA, and you then feed all the blocks the data stream coming off the detector. When you are finished reading the data into the FPGA, you can then read the result back from each block.

When you "burn" a chip from a FPGA, what it means is that you take the VHDL (etc) code and compile it into a format which you can use to produce specialized chips, instead of a format for programming an FPGA.

about 2 months ago
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CERN Tests First Artificial Retina Capable of Looking For High Energy Particles

kyrsjo Re:Summary (60 comments)

Oh, and 2 m should have been 2 um. Slashdot ate my alt-gr+m = \mu...

about 2 months ago
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CERN Tests First Artificial Retina Capable of Looking For High Energy Particles

kyrsjo Re:Summary is completely misleading (60 comments)

Part of the method may very well be to put the clustering algorithm directly onto the the same chip as is doing the digital readout of the sensor, i.e. bump-bonded on the back of the sensor, directly providing estimated (x,y) coordinates of the particle hits instead of raw pixel data with zero-suppression as is traditionally done.

However, this is not what this paper is discussing. It discusses mapping the parameter space (m,q) of the gradient and intercept of a particle track y=m*z+q into some kind of matrix, and then applying an algorithm which describes how well the data fits with each of the points in the parameter space. This is thus integrating the information from several sub-detectors, and can thus not be done on the "image sensor" (which is usually a "hybrid", i.e. a chip with an array of detector diodes, coupled to another chip which has the electronics).

While this paper is pretty light on details (I'm guessing some sort of conference paper), it references another single-author paper in NIM A (which author is also a co-author on this paper) from 2000:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/s...
It appears to be open-access, at least I can read it without logging in to VPN.

about 2 months ago
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CERN Tests First Artificial Retina Capable of Looking For High Energy Particles

kyrsjo Summary (60 comments)

So, to summarize the paper
http://arxiv.org/pdf/1409.1565... :

They have developed an algorithm for quickly giving a rough interpretation of the raw data stream coming out from the detector, i.e. converting the information that "value pixel A =12, value of pixel B = 43, ..." into useful physics data like "a particle with momentum vector P and charge Q was probably created 2 m from the collision point". This algorithm is special in that it can be implemented on an FPGA, and is somehow inspired by the retina of our eyes. Because it can run on an FPGA, it has the potential to be much faster, and can handle much larger data fluxes than current algorithms.

This is needed, because in a few years, we will upgrade the LHC such that it produces many more collisions per second, i.e. the data rates will be much higher. We do this to get more statistics, which may uncover rare physics processes (such as was done for the Higgs boson). Not all of this data deluge can be written to disk (or even downloaded from the detector hardware), so we use a trigger which decides which collisions are interesting enough to read out and store. This trigger works by downloading *part* of the data to a computing cluster that sits in the next room (yes, it does run on Linux), quickly reconstructing the event, and sending the "READ" signal to the rest of the detector if it fits certain criteria indicating that (for example) a heavy particle was created. If the data rate goes up, so must the processing speed, or else we will run out of buffers on the detector.

about 2 months ago
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$75K Prosthetic Arm Is Bricked When Paired iPod Is Stolen

kyrsjo Re:Hmmm ... (194 comments)

Still, there has to be some kind of mechanism to do the initial pairing, even if this requires removing a PCB and hooking it up to the diag/programming equipment they have at the factory. Even counting a few hours of engineers time, it would be much much less that 70k.

about 3 months ago

Submissions

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Programming in schools

kyrsjo kyrsjo writes  |  about 7 months ago

kyrsjo (2420192) writes "The Economist has an article on how information technology — the real stuff, not just button-pushing — is making it's way back to schools across the world. As the article argues: "Digital technology is now so ubiquitous that many think a rounded education requires a grounding in this subject just as much as in biology, chemistry or physics."

In today's society, teaching computer science in schools is absolutely necessary, and that means getting a real understanding of computers and how they work. That requires working with algorithms and programming, not just learning which buttons to push in the program that the school happened to use."

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