Beta

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

In France, Most Comments on Gaza Conflict Yanked From Mainstream News Sites

kyrsjo Re:Or maybe you're not so good at math (509 comments)

99% of people are fully capable of separating Israel the state and jews the people, even if they are criticising Israel the state. That people are (verbally) "attacking jews" when they are criticizing the actions of the Israeli government is mostly a right-wing strawman.

2 days ago
top

In France, Most Comments on Gaza Conflict Yanked From Mainstream News Sites

kyrsjo Re:Or maybe you're not so good at math (509 comments)

This.

Israel is in western countries (Europe and US) regarded as "one of us" - and we hold them to a higher standard than some dictator in small far-away country we don't have very tight relations to. Also, because of these relations, and because Israel is somewhat dependent on support from the west and many Israelis have tight connections to (family, business), we regard it as more likely that they would listen to protests in the rest of the west, than whoever is fighting in Sudan would listen.

4 days ago
top

Elite Group of Researchers Rule Scientific Publishing

kyrsjo Re:Just an opinion... (123 comments)

Physics is the same: First and often 2nd author did 90% of the work, then comes people who contributed a little, and finally the supervisor/advisor.

However, some conference papers in my field (accelerator physics) have a different scheme of author sorting: First listed is the corresponding author, i.e. the person who actually wrote the paper and did most of the work. Then comes the rest of the people in his/her institution, listed alphabetically. Then comes the rest of the people, sorted first by institution and then by name.

about two weeks ago
top

Ode To Sound Blaster: Are Discrete Audio Cards Still Worth the Investment?

kyrsjo Re:Yes (502 comments)

Computers are different here. I now have a Dell Latitude 14" machine (I can't find the model number now... On older model the model number was printed over the keyboard, but it isn't anymore), and it came with two mic's built into the top of the display bezel, next to a reasonable web cam. With Skype and similar apps on Linux, the audio is really good.

My old machine (also a Latitude, but a 7-8 year old model) had the mic on the main body of the machine, above the keyboard. That meant it picked up all sort of keyboard and fan noises, making an external webcam with a built-in USB mic completely necessary for internet telephony.

about three weeks ago
top

Norway Scraps Online Voting

kyrsjo Re:What logic! (139 comments)

Huh. State elections or presidential/senate/house of representatives? Is it a "real" mail-in vote, or is it more like an election booth at the post office (such that you vote in private)?

But yeah, maybe it's better than the endless queues that seems to happen on every US election...

about a month ago
top

Norway Scraps Online Voting

kyrsjo Re:What logic! (139 comments)

Exactly - they are equivalent except for the ease-of-use. And voting in Norway is already pretty easy (source: I am a citizen) - you have voting booths at basically every primary school during election day with quite short queues, and you can pre-vote a lot of places (which was my preference a couple of times - go to the booth in the corner of the university canteen). They also come around to hospitals, retirement homes etc. so that even if you're stuck in bed, they bring the ballot box to you.

Where is mail-in voting the default?

about a month ago
top

Norway Scraps Online Voting

kyrsjo Re:Concerns about online voting (139 comments)

I think we don't have as much problems with corrupt politicians as the US. There are also many more parties to choose from, and governements are typically coalitions of 2-3 parties.

about a month ago
top

Norway Scraps Online Voting

kyrsjo Re:Wait, trials? (139 comments)

You're wrong.

In Norway, the standard system is that you get into a private voting booth, which is stocked with ballots for different parties. You may if you wish rearrange this ballot (cross out candidates etc. using a normal pen), before you put the ballot in a closed envelope. You take this envelope, together with an ID, to the ballot box, show the ID and get crossed off the list, and put the envelope in the ballot box.

It is also possible to cast the vote a few weeks earlier at some locations (local government offices, universities, embassies/consulates etc.), basically using the same system except that the protocol (the list which you are crossed off from) is electronic.

Finally it is possible to mail in a ballot (you need not use the official forms, it is acceptable to write the name of your favourite party on a sheet of paper) if you are living abroad, but the process is somewhat complicated. This probably corresponds closest to the electronic system.

about a month ago
top

Norway Scraps Online Voting

kyrsjo Re:What logic! (139 comments)

I think the strongest argument against home-PC-voting is that secrecy of the vote is not protected, as someone (husband/wife/boss/religious leader/...) could force you to vote against your own conviction.

about a month ago
top

2 US Senators Propose 12-Cent Gas Tax Increase

kyrsjo Re:Good! (619 comments)

In Kuwait it's subsidized - and since you want to bring up subsidies: In Venezuela, it's subsidized by Chavez's governement to 0.015$/liter...

about a month and a half ago
top

2 US Senators Propose 12-Cent Gas Tax Increase

kyrsjo Re:warming is Good! (619 comments)

> Pollution from cars--hmm, not much lately since the advent of catalytic converters.

Eh, these don't reduce CO2, which is also pollution.

about a month and a half ago
top

CERN's Particle Smashers List Their Toughest Tech Challenges

kyrsjo Re:Heard a talk from a CERN physicist (31 comments)

Luckilly most of that is done in the trigger of the experiment, where dedicated hardware solutions filter out a lot. These boards typically sits physically close to the experiment, monitoring a few key subdetectors. When one of a list of pre-programmed conditions occur, they read out all the data from that event, and pass it on to higher levels of sorting. This has to happen very quickly, as there is a new collission every 25 ns, and each of the subdetectors can only hold the data for a few events before it "rolls off the pipeline".

It's kind of a very very fast spamfilter...

about 2 months ago
top

What qualifications should the 'driver' of a fully autonomous car need?

kyrsjo Re:Why not car company? (301 comments)

I was answering to your comment, which seemed to imply that they are never point-to-point, when the system as a whole often are. And for the on-demand thing: If it leaves every 10 minutes or so, that's close enough.

But shure, if you live out on the contryside, it gets harder, especially during the night. However it's funny that you mention airports, as they are often quite well served by public transport. I have myself several times taken the airport express train or bus to catch an early flight.

about 2 months ago
top

What qualifications should the 'driver' of a fully autonomous car need?

kyrsjo Re:Why not car company? (301 comments)

You might have to switch to a subway / bus / tram and (ghasp!) maybe walk a few 100 meters.

about 2 months ago
top

Who controls the HVAC at work?

kyrsjo Re:Has this ever happened to you? (216 comments)

Actually, to me it always made more sense that the indoors temperature should to a certain degree follow the outdoor temp - during the winter I have more clothes on, so I preffer a bit colder. During the summer I work in a t-shirt and shorts, so make it warmer please!

In the end, we end up only running the AC a few months in the middle of the summer + running the heat (waterborne radiator under the desk, perfect to rest my feet on when they're cold :) ) through the winter. We do have AC in this corridor (top floor facing the sun), but it's not really standard here. Luckilly it's each and every office has it's own thermostat, the only common control is whether it's set to cooling or heating (useless...) - and all the people in the office agree on what is a comfortable temperature.

Oh, and no reason to excuse yourself for using sane units :)

about 3 months ago
top

First Arrest In Japan For 3D-Printed Guns

kyrsjo Re:Hey Tim (274 comments)

The point I'm trying to make, is that violent crime is not directly a lever - you can't legislate less violent crime, only measures to lower it. Thus the statistic "violent crime" in itself is always better if it's lower - but of course the measures taken may also influence other things. That doesn't make violent crime into something you want in a society.

I also question your assertion that "the European situation is not a desireable one" - here people may have differing opinions, I would say that the US situation is not a desireable one.

about 3 months ago
top

First Arrest In Japan For 3D-Printed Guns

kyrsjo Re:Hey Tim (274 comments)

It absolutely does make sense to talk about single factors in isolation - it is obvious that lowered rate of violent crime is a good thing.

It is also likely that trying to change society in order to lower this statistic will affect other aspects of society, and not all of these changes are wanted - I think we agree on that. Thus it becomes an optimization problem, where you try to maximise some set of values - typically safety from violence (no matter wether it comes from private persons or governement, against your person or your property), freedom (what we typically call "liberal values" i.e. the freedom from someone else telling you what you can and can't do), predictability (i.e. making it unlikely that the economy crashes tomorrow, or Putin invades, or tax law rapidly changes, etc.), economic growth (you can afford more stuff next year) and many more.

These values have to be weighted against each other, and it is by no means certain that the current setup is the ideal one or even the only good one. Given that the boundary conditions are always changing, what worked yesterday may be less optimal today, so we must continiously reevaluate both our goal function and how we try to maximize it. As an example, there are many places which are further from being a "police state" than the US, while still having relatively strict gun laws - this is only a insignificantly tiny part of the huge patchwork which is society.

about 3 months ago

Submissions

top

Programming in schools

kyrsjo kyrsjo writes  |  about 3 months ago

kyrsjo (2420192) writes "The Economist has an article on how information technology — the real stuff, not just button-pushing — is making it's way back to schools across the world. As the article argues: "Digital technology is now so ubiquitous that many think a rounded education requires a grounding in this subject just as much as in biology, chemistry or physics."

In today's society, teaching computer science in schools is absolutely necessary, and that means getting a real understanding of computers and how they work. That requires working with algorithms and programming, not just learning which buttons to push in the program that the school happened to use."

Link to Original Source

Journals

kyrsjo has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?
or Connect with...

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>