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Is a Moral Compass a Hindrance Or a Help For Startups?

labnet Re:Capitalism does not reward morality (194 comments)

Great Post:
The USA has allowed capitalists to subvert government to impoverish its people... but look at northern Europe: highly socialist while allowing capitalism and I think a much more mature society than the USA.
Even in Australia, we are much more socialized than the USA, and yes I hate the high taxes, but it provides a much better safety net for the poor.

3 days ago
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Microsoft Azure Outage Across the Globe

labnet Re:Yawn ... (163 comments)

Yeah, but it's never really been about the reliability. It's always been the "not paying your own IT maintenance staff" thing that's the big draw.

I priced 10 2core VMs. It was 24k/annum. We do that internally on an R720 that cost 10k and needs about 3 hours a month maintenance. So for mainly internal use networks, where is the value?

3 days ago
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Microsoft Azure Outage Across the Globe

labnet Re:What am I not getting? (163 comments)

Cheaper?
10 x 2core vms is $20k /annum. We do that on r720 that cost $10k and a couple of hours a month maintainance.

3 days ago
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An Applied Investigation Into Graphics Card Coil Whine

labnet Re:The Cause (111 comments)

AC is correct. Most forms of subharmonic oscillation are caused by slope compensation issues, but pole filtering can also be an issue . For those who want the nitty gritty details, see this. http://www.ti.com/lit/ml/slup2...

about a week ago
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An Applied Investigation Into Graphics Card Coil Whine

labnet The Cause (111 comments)

I've designed lots of these little switch mode supplies. (SMPSs)
The noise comes from the inductors. Inductors are coils of wire around a ferrite. When the current changes through the wire, the wire physically expands and contacts from every other wire. This is the source of the noise. (SMPSs normally switch from 200kHz to 2MHz, so well outside our audio range)
There are a few things a designer can do.
1. Encapsulate the coil. This holds the wire tighter together and can minimise noise, but is only usually used in large inductors like those in invertors for UPSs or solar.
2. Eliminate subsonic oscillation with good multi-pole compensation. Switch mode power supplies have, have first second and third order responses which require filters to damp them. If you don't design these filters well, you can get subsonic oscillation which falls into the audio band. The power supply still regulates OK, but you can get that annoying whine.
3. Occasionally the noise can also come from a periodic load with that falls into an audio range. More capacitors on the output can help that.

Also, very very occasionally, it can come from ceramic capacitors that use a high k dielectric that are microphonic, but in my experience it is usually the capacitor acting as a microphone that upsets the circuit.

about a week ago
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Microsoft To Open Source .NET and Take It Cross-Platform

labnet Re:Microsoft is not less evil,more companies are E (524 comments)

It describes Supercapitalism. Look it up on amazon and read the first review which summarises the concept well. Companies exists to provide the best value both shareholders and customers which deflates real wages. They play by the rules governments set, so it is up to governments to legislate the social outcomes they expect.

about two weeks ago
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The Effect of Programming Language On Software Quality

labnet Re:Emacs! (217 comments)

HaHa... Modded Insightful!!

about two weeks ago
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The Plane Crash That Gave Us GPS

labnet GNSS (236 comments)

I'm encouraging my engineers to refer to GPS as GNSS, as there are 3 other systems
Glosnass, the Russian system which is now operating.
BeiDou the Chinese system also operational.
And Galileo, the EU system which has had all sorts of delays.

about three weeks ago
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YouTube Opens Up 60fps To Everyone

labnet Re: Firefox better get their act together (152 comments)

Yet it still the only browser that does side tabs properly with treetab plugin, which is why it still my primary browser.

about three weeks ago
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OneDrive Delivers Unlimited Cloud Storage To Office 365 Subscribers

labnet NSA Indexing (145 comments)

What a gift to the NSA!

about a month ago
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Statisticians Uncover What Makes For a Stable Marriage

labnet Re:Questiona re a bit sexists (447 comments)

Or it could be church goers on the whole have a better attitude to marriage. Like 1cor13, exposing the selfless virtues of love, and the many endorsements of sticking with the partner you have chosen.

about a month ago
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Antiperspirants Could Contribute to Particulate Pollution

labnet Alum Crystal (70 comments)

I switch to alum crystal type deoderant years ago.

http://www.bodycrystal.com.au/...

They work well and last about 2 years per stick.

about a month and a half ago
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World's Smallest 3G Module Will Connect Everything To the Internet

labnet Re:Just in Time! (118 comments)

That's an American problem. GSM was sparingly rolled out in the US due to the prevalence of CDMA, so reclamation of those frequencies is manageable. There are no such plans for the rest of the world, where there are hundreds of millions of GSM devices still in use.

Australia is shutting down it's 2G networks to make room for LTE.

about 2 months ago
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World's Smallest 3G Module Will Connect Everything To the Internet

labnet The Players in this Market (118 comments)

I've been researching M2M for new products we have been developing.

The main players are
Telit (HE910 sereis), Italy
Sierra Wireless (HL6528/HL8548), Canadian
Quectel (UC20), Chinese
Gemalto EHS6, French
U-Blox (Lisa and Sara), Swiss

I'm not sure if there is even a USA company that plays in this space.
All the modules are of similar sie but have incompatible footprints.

Essentially, these modules will embed a Broadcom SOC and a custom OS. Broadcom was charging the module makers too much, so they have started moving to Intel and others. These product cost mega bucks to develop, and even after you buy a module with all the R&D done, you still need to spend a another $60k in certification if you want to get it on the AT&T network (per product).

There is going to be a lot of growth in this area as people develop IoT gateways. (as we are doing)

about 2 months ago
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Scientists Twist Radio Beams To Send Data At 32 Gigabits Per Second

labnet Re:Polarization modulation. (122 comments)

It's still modulation, modulation creates sidebands, and sidebands require bandwidth.

Nothing has changed, the Shannon–Hartley theorem still rules.

It's not modulation, it's multiplexing using a constant angular momentum. Modulation requires a change in something. With this case the they are sending seperate radio streams using different but constant rotated angluar momentums.
Think of it like 3D glasses in movie cinema that use right and left hand polarised light.

about 2 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Advice On Building a Firewall With VPN Capabilities?

labnet Re:eBay a Cisco ASA 5505 (238 comments)

Got to agree. We use a cyberoam appliance and ssl VPN. Does all firewall and av duties as well as VPN.

about 2 months ago
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Smartphone Kill Switch, Consumer Boon Or Way For Government To Brick Your Phone?

labnet IMEI Blocking in Australia (299 comments)

In OZ, the carriers block at the IMEI level, so if a phone is stolen you can't use it in Australia (unless you can change the IMEI to one that the carriers recognise as valid)
http://www.lost.amta.org.au/

Why doen't the USA do this as a sterting point?

about 3 months ago
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Toxic Algae Threatens Florida's Gulf Coast

labnet Synthetic Grass (99 comments)

One reason I turfed my backyard with artificial turf.
I was sick of weeds, animals digging in it, mowing it, fertilizing it, the kids trampoline killing it.

Synthetic grass can now look as good as the real deal. It can get hot in summer, but otherwise its nice having an always perfect looking lawn.

about 3 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Can Tech Help Monitor or Mitigate a Mine-Flooded Ecosystem?

labnet Knee Jerk (123 comments)

NO mine wants a tailings dam to collapse. There are regular conferences on how to design the things and specialists who design them. NO CEO wants this to happen, because the cost reparations is horrendous, and contrary to what the comments have been like here, the bosses of these companies (well the ones I've know of) want to be good corporate citizens.
Mining has risks, and incidents like this will ne analysed and fed back into the future design models, and like all things in life, will improve over time.

about 3 months ago

Submissions

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Iron Nanospheres Turn Plants Into Plastics

labnet labnet writes  |  more than 2 years ago

labnet (457441) writes "A new type of catalyst made of iron nanoparticles enables the efficient conversion of non-food plant waste into the key components of materials such as plastics, medicines, and paint. The catalyst was developed by chemists at Utrecht University in The Netherlands, together with Dow Chemical's Benelux operation and Delft University of Technology."
Link to Original Source
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Single ion clock 100 times more accurate than atomic clock

labnet labnet writes  |  more than 2 years ago

labnet (457441) writes "From news.com.au :

University of New South Wales School of Physics professor Victor Flambaum has found a method of timekeeping nearly 100 times more accurate than the best atomic clocks. By using the orbit of a neutron around an atomic nucleus he says the system stays accurate to within 1/20th of a second over billions of years. Although perhaps not for daily use, the technology could prove valuable in science experiments where chronological accuracy is paramount, Prof Flambaum said.

Read more: http://www.news.com.au/technology/sci-tech/nucelar-clock-100-times-more-accurate-than-atomic-clock/story-fn5fsgyc-1226297068083#ixzz1osFDYtyb"
Link to Original Source

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labnet labnet writes  |  more than 8 years ago

labnet (457441) writes "RFID is starting to gain serious traction since WalMart mandated its use in their back end delivery sytems (RFID at the pallet level). Now a Ronald Bormaster is claiming "a patent application for an inventory-control system using radio frequency identification".. including things like livestock (which in many countries has been used to inventory animals since last century). He is now suing Wal-Mart, Gillette, Michelin, Home Depot, Target and Pfizer."

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