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Google and Adobe Contribute Open Source Rasterizer to FreeType

lattyware Re:Meh , fonts. Big deal. (77 comments)

I don't know about you, but I spend about 90% of my time on a computer reading text on some variety. It makes sense to spend time getting something we use so extensively right.

about a year and a half ago
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Europe Needs Genetically Engineered Crops, Scientists Say

lattyware Re:There's plenty of food. (586 comments)

That is just clearly not true - why do we use insecticides? To stop plants getting eaten by insects. Why? Because that increases yields. Why would we make a plant produce insecticide other than to increase yields? They don't just do it for fun.

about a year and a half ago
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Excel Error Contributes To Problems With Austerity Study

lattyware Re:Excel error? (476 comments)

You make a good point, but just to be devil's advocate, neither of those are true for Python, where an average is:

sum(data)/len(data)

(In 2.x, there is an integer division error there, but I'm talking 3.x).

about a year and a half ago
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Python Family Gets a Triplet Of Updates

lattyware Re:Not that surprising (196 comments)

You say that you need the backwards compatibility, but you never say why? Why does it make a difference that you are running old code in an old interpreter rather than the new one? Why force new code to be the same as that old code? It's the same thing, only you get the choice to advance.

It's not impossible to upgrade code, and it's always possible to run it in an old (but supported) interpreter. There is no merit to keeping the language at a standstill.

about a year and a half ago
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Python Family Gets a Triplet Of Updates

lattyware Re:Not that surprising (196 comments)

There is a huge difference there - the kernel isn't like Python, you can't run two disparate versions on the same system to run older code.

Programming language have to be able to make occasional breaking changes like this, because otherwise we settle for crap languages with all the problems that can't be fixed. You know what happens then? People make more languages to fill the gap, and then rather than just making a few changes, you either stick with the old bad version (just as you could have before), or switch to a new language which will require a complete rewrite rather than just modification (which, in Python's case, is often as simple as pushing it through 2to3).

If you really can't afford to have Python change, continue to use 2.x - guess what, it's still (as evidenced by this post) being supported, and will be for some time yet.

about a year and a half ago
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Python Family Gets a Triplet Of Updates

lattyware Re:Not that surprising (196 comments)

It's unlikely to happen in the foreseeable future, but ruling it out would be foolhardy - clearly in time the language could be expanded and need alterations.

about a year and a half ago
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Python Family Gets a Triplet Of Updates

lattyware Re:Not that surprising (196 comments)

Of course I understand the importance, but your argument is that there should never be any breaking changes, which means languages have to be perfect from the moment they are made, which is clearly never going to happen. Either we accept a broken language, which is not acceptable, or we make breaking changes. That's necessary sometimes. If you need to, 2.x still exists and you can run something using it.

about a year and a half ago
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Python Family Gets a Triplet Of Updates

lattyware Re:Not that surprising (196 comments)

That doesn't make sense. Of course there is a reason to use Python. I'm not saying PHP being bad makes Python good, I'm using PHP as an example in favour of making breaking changes, as not doing that has caused the language to develop in a way that turns it into a really bad language. As to 'It's only worth it if you can can be sure that you won't have more backwards incompatible changes in the future.' - that makes no sense. Potentially, in the future, the language could have new features added, or features changed to make it better that require breaking backwards compatibility. Naturally, there is always a need to weigh up the cost of doing so with the benefits. I doubt we'll see breaking changes in Python for a long time yet, but they may well happen at some point, and there is nothing wrong with that.

about a year and a half ago
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Python Family Gets a Triplet Of Updates

lattyware Re:Not that surprising (196 comments)

Yes. They do. Again, I use PHP as my example. It's a horrible mess of a language due to the fact they refused to make breaking changes. It's horrific to work with, and virtually impossible to follow good practises with. Loosing backwards compatibility is worth it, when done rarely.

about a year and a half ago
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Python Family Gets a Triplet Of Updates

lattyware Re:Not that surprising (196 comments)

1. Why bother? The language can support it natively, so why not just do that?

2. It should never reach that point - it sounds like your code is convoluted and poorly laid out. If the cost of the function call is actually affecting your program, then the code you are talking about is hugely performance-sensitive, and should probably be offloaded into an extension module.

about a year and a half ago
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Python Family Gets a Triplet Of Updates

lattyware Re:Not that surprising (196 comments)

Except that's simply not true. 3.x is the only time that has happened since the language moved out of it's initial stages.

about a year and a half ago
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Python Family Gets a Triplet Of Updates

lattyware Re:Not that surprising (196 comments)

Why? You just run your old programs in 2.7. Both can be installed at the same time, and there are well-defined ways of indicating which should be used. Sure, there is some cost to not having backwards compatibility, but the gains from improving the language far outweigh those.

about a year and a half ago
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Python Family Gets a Triplet Of Updates

lattyware Re:Not that surprising (196 comments)

That doesn't make it a good idea. Go and look at PHP, and you'll see why. PHP is a horrific mess of deprecated stuff, and it's insanely hard to find the right way to do something in the cruft of hacked in features and old ways of doing things. As with all things, we make mistakes when we design languages. Sometimes, we can fix those without breaking backwards compatibility, sometimes we can't. It's worth making the break to make the language better - it's just not wise to do it more than very rarely.

about a year and a half ago
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Python Family Gets a Triplet Of Updates

lattyware Re:A feature still missing (196 comments)

Wow, really? I've not dealt with C# much, so I can't talk on that front, but I've found Python's docs far more useful than Java's.

about a year and a half ago
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Python Family Gets a Triplet Of Updates

lattyware Re: The Python Launcher (196 comments)

Indeed, and for many platforms - I worded my post poorly - I meant to say that unlike py2exe, cx_Freeze works with 3.x as well as 2.x.

about a year and a half ago
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Python Family Gets a Triplet Of Updates

lattyware Re:Not that surprising (196 comments)

If you hate it that much, it'd be trivial to write an application that compiles braces into indentation. The reality is it is more readable, and nicer to write. If you are having problems with whitespace being significant, maybe you should find software that isn't crazy - everything I use handles it fine.

about a year and a half ago
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Python Family Gets a Triplet Of Updates

lattyware Re:A feature still missing (196 comments)

The documentation is great in general, you seem to have found one missing link in a relatively obscure class. As a whole, Python's docs are great. They generally explain well and give full examples.

about a year and a half ago
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Python Family Gets a Triplet Of Updates

lattyware Re:Not that surprising (196 comments)

That's how you end up being PHP. Python 3 fixes core mistakes made in earlier versions of the language, and makes it harder to write bad code. That's a good thing, and the last thing you want is a language full of 20 ways to do something, 18 of which are deprecated. Removing backwards compatibility for the 3.x line was a good idea.

about a year and a half ago
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"Lazarus Project" Clones Extinct Frog

lattyware Wrex (154 comments)

Not going to lie, this was my first thought.

about a year and a half ago

Submissions

Journals

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Injecting text into a copy/paste from text, using only CSS.

lattyware lattyware writes  |  more than 5 years ago I recently discovered a half-bug which affects all the major browsers, and only requires CSS to function.
It is possible to place text-off screen in such a way as to add text in when a block of text (such as a URL) is copy/pasted as Firefox appears to select text based on the code, not on-screen location.
In the day and age when people are told to copy/paste links to sites to avoid fake links, this is a pretty easy way to falsify a link. It's not entirely effective, as it's easy to spot when you paste, and doesn't help with security certificates, but if one uses a long URL and masks it cleverly, it could be an effective tactic, given the ignorance of the average user.
Obviously, the text is selected due to code position, as doing it any other way would be slower, so whether this should be 'fixed' or if it is even a bug is in the air, but, at the very least, it's mildly interesting.

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