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Comments

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Debian's Systemd Adoption Inspires Threat of Fork

linuxrocks123 Re:Fedora fork too (550 comments)

Oopsy, minor mistake:

Correct auto-restart command follows:
while true; do if ps aux | grep -v grep | grep -q sendmail; then /etc/rc.d/rc.sendmail start; fi; done

3 days ago
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Debian's Systemd Adoption Inspires Threat of Fork

linuxrocks123 Re:Fedora fork too (550 comments)

If you want to query the service status, use ps aux | grep sendmail

And if sendmail dies, well, I would want it to stay dead so I would notice and look into why it died, but if you really wanted auto-restart, you have a number of options:

- Put "while true; do if ps aux | grep -v grep | grep -q sendmail; then /etc/rc.d/rc.sendmail start; done" somewhere.
- (The right way): put the command to start sendmail (not the startup script, sendmail itself) in inittab with the :respawn: option. You'll have to make sure to use the "foreground" option if you choose this route.

3 days ago
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Debian's Systemd Adoption Inspires Threat of Fork

linuxrocks123 Re:Fedora fork too (550 comments)

As sibling said, this was Slackware's script, so you're actually criticizing its implementation of the BSD rc.d system.

And they are valid criticisms -- unrelated processes called sendmail would also get killed -- but my response would be, "yes, but, well, I've never run into that." If you stop sendmail, I think you should expect that some email might be dropped. You could easily create a sendmail.pid file in the script if you wanted, but I think keeping the script simple has greater value than catching those corner cases.

3 days ago
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Debian's Systemd Adoption Inspires Threat of Fork

linuxrocks123 Re:Fedora fork too (550 comments)

All that proves is that Fedora's init scripts suck. I'll believe that.

Here's Slackware's rc.sendmail script:

#!/bin/sh
# Start/stop/restart sendmail.

# Start sendmail:
sendmail_start() {
    if [ -x /usr/sbin/sendmail ]; then
        echo "Starting sendmail MTA daemon: /usr/sbin/sendmail -L sm-mta -bd -q25m" /usr/sbin/sendmail -L sm-mta -bd -q25m
        echo "Starting sendmail MSP queue runner: /usr/sbin/sendmail -L sm-msp-queue -Ac -q25m" /usr/sbin/sendmail -L sm-msp-queue -Ac -q25m
    fi
}

# Stop sendmail:
sendmail_stop() {
    killall sendmail
}

# Restart sendmail:
sendmail_restart() {
    sendmail_stop
    sleep 1
    sendmail_start
}

case "$1" in
'start')
    sendmail_start ;;
'stop')
    sendmail_stop ;;
'restart')
    sendmail_restart ;;
*)
    echo "usage $0 start|stop|restart"
esac

4 days ago
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Debian's Systemd Adoption Inspires Threat of Fork

linuxrocks123 Re:That's all we need ... (550 comments)

it's the future whether I like it or not. And I don't

SystemD clearly has enough adoption that it won't be going away any time soon. Some people, for whatever reason, want an init system that works like that. But other people clearly don't like it. Many of those people are programmers and now want to fork Debian. Even if that fizzles, there's still Slackware and at least Funtoo which are not using SystemD. Funtoo in its FAQ is committed not to using SystemD. Slackware isn't committed, but I think mainly because Volkerding knows to "never say never". But Slackware got rid of GNOME with its annoying PAM dependency long, long ago, so GNOME won't be forcing anything on Slackware, and Slackware uses BSD-style init rather than SystemV, so it was already an init outlier before all of this started. The point is, people who don't like SystemD will coalesce around the distributions not using it, or set up their own, and do the work necessary to keep them not using it.

Just like with the shutdown of FreeCrypt, there are enough people around who think this is important that they will be able to coalesce and do something about it.

4 days ago
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Ask Slashdot: Stop PulseAudio From Changing Sound Settings?

linuxrocks123 PulseAudio Is Crap (285 comments)

PulseAudio is a piece of crap. Uninstall it, uninstall Skype, and use something else like Ekiga. Don't let a minor pissant program like Skype pull in the SystemD of audio.

about a week ago
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Court Rules Parents May Be Liable For What Their Kids Post On Facebook

linuxrocks123 Re:Why is the school involved? (323 comments)

Damnit Slashdot!

Corrected post is here.

The US does libel and slander pretty well. For instance, if you're slandering/libeling a public figure, the burden of proof the public figure bears is higher than if you're talking about some random dude. The libeled individual has to prove the statement is false. There are cases of abuse, such as where someone gets sued by a rich person just to harass. It's not perfect. But I think anti-SLAPP laws are a better fix for that than saying, "it's perfectly okay to spread vicious lies about anyone you want."

It's true that popular speech doesn't need protection. But it's one thing to say, "I think <insert race or gender or hair color here> people are a bunch of savages, and they should all be locked up!" It's another thing to say, "This particular <insert race or gender or hair color here> person is a pedophile, raped my wife, and tortures animals for fun!" One of these things is stupid, but rightly protected speech. The other is harassment of a particular individual. There's a difference.

about a week ago
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Court Rules Parents May Be Liable For What Their Kids Post On Facebook

linuxrocks123 Re:Why is the school involved? (323 comments)

The US does libel and slander pretty well. For instance, if you're slandering/libeling a public figure, the burden of proof the public figure bears is higher than if you're talking about some random dude. The libeled individual has to prove the statement is false. There are cases of abuse, such as where someone gets sued by a rich person just to harass. It's not perfect. But I think anti-SLAPP laws are a better fix for that than saying, "it's perfectly okay to spread vicious lies about anyone you want."

It's true that popular speech doesn't need protection. But it's one thing to say, "I think people are a bunch of savages, and they should all be locked up!" It's another thing to say, "This particular person is a pedophile, raped my wife, and tortures animals for fun!" One of these things is stupid, but rightly protected speech. The other is harassment of a particular individual. There's a difference.

about a week ago
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Court Rules Parents May Be Liable For What Their Kids Post On Facebook

linuxrocks123 Re:Why not? When you have kids.. (323 comments)

So, your system would have people able to say anything, and then you read someone's mind to figure out he didn't hire you, or didn't invite you to his party, or stopped being your friend because he thought you're a pedo, and then you sue all those people. Meaning you're making EVERYTHING a protected class for the purposes of hiring and killing freedom of association while you're at it. That sounds like a much more restrictive world to me than the current one, which just has, "don't spread nasty lies about people" as the prohibition.

about a week ago
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Early Childhood Neglect Associated With Altered Brain Structure, ADHD

linuxrocks123 Re:Parallels exist in animals (87 comments)

Human nature is the same as all other nature.

I'll be more serious now: no, it's not. We fit the definition of animals, yes, but we're freaks of nature. We're smarter than all other animals we know of; our brains have more synapses than any other animal we know of; we have more complex societies than any other animal we know of; and, we've been able to harness more energy in directed ways than any other animals we know of (exhibited by electrical grids, cars, planes, and rockets that leave the fucking atmosphere and send objects into space). You wouldn't necessarily expect, say, a mouse or fish to have the same problems with emotional neglect that human children have if they aren't "shown love" but still have all their basic nutritional needs met. That's something that's going to fuck up humans much, much more than most other animals. It'll fuck up monkeys (someone did a morally reprehensible experiment, referred to elsewhere in this thread, that proved that). According to the GP, it'll fuck up dogs, too, which you might expect since they're relatively smart. But you can't go the other way. You can't say, "this level of social interaction is fine for my dog, so my kid'll be fine if I treat him like that, too". Because we're not like dogs. We're an extreme of nature. We're freaks.

about a week ago
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Early Childhood Neglect Associated With Altered Brain Structure, ADHD

linuxrocks123 Re:Parallels exist in animals (87 comments)

Dude, that's no excuse. You still need to stop peeing on my lawn.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Handling Patented IP In a Job Interview?

linuxrocks123 Re:Are you patenting software? (224 comments)

I'm not sure how one might think patents on methods of optimizing database queries would not qualify as software patents. As someone else said below, it's applied mathematics. Heck, the "relational" part of "relational database" comes from the theory of set relations. And if databases are your field, you know that. And if you'd donated the patents to the EFF, then you wouldn't be asking this question.

Trying to play devil's advocate the only counterargument I can come up with is, "the optimizations are useful because of the way this particular computer is architected." But that's silly; much of number theory is useful and studied because it's applicable to cryptography. Being useful in an engineering situation doesn't turn mathematics into engineering.

I don't believe in telling people to fuck off for asking an honest question. At the same time, I'm not personally inclined to help you with your problem, because you're asking with help engaging in an antisocial activity. The weird thing is, from your comment, it seems we're in agreement on that, but you don't see that what you're doing is what we both believe is wrong. Dude, those kinds of patents are the types of things most software developers talk about when they mean software patents. Amazon one-click and Microsoft's FAT patent are just talked about more because *EVERYONE* runs into those, whereas only compiler developers run into the asinine register allocation patents, and only database developers run into yours. But they're still bad, just bad in a narrower field. Look up the history of register allocation in GCC and LLVM if you want to see what patents can do to OSS. LLVM uses linear scan register allocation, which is faster than the standard graph coloring algorithm, but worse-performing. Guess which consideration is most important in 2014 when you can compile on 16 CPUs at once? GCC, as usual, does something totally fucked up because it's been around so long accumulating cruft, but its algorithm was originally designed around exactly the same patents LLVM had to design around.

Again: software patents have crippled open source compilers' register allocation algorithms from the dawn of GCC to the rise of LLVM. How disgusting is that? And the register allocation patents are what happens when we're aware of the patents and they're held by an OSS-friendly company (IBM).

If you're not going to stop patenting software, but you care about the ethical implications of your work, my minimal request to you would be to donate the patents somewhere like the EFF or FSF in your will. If you don't, your heirs might decide to sell your work to SCOracle and you'll fuck up every OSS database for a LONG. TIME. I'm sure you don't want that to be your legacy.

And btw, if you haven't, you should have your estate planning done anyway. Everyone with even a small amount of assets should. Shit happens, it's not as expensive as you might think, and a competent attorney will also prepare "collaterals" where you say, among other things, what you want to happen if you end up like Terri Schiavo. And if you're not aware of why you really need to make that absolutely clear in a totally legally binding way ... just look at the Wikipedia article for "Terri Schiavo".

about two weeks ago
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Technology Heats Up the Adultery Arms Race

linuxrocks123 The guy's a hack (304 comments)

There are already decryption utilities that we use to decrypt all of Microsoft products, this will be one more. However, there are technologies that are already out that can make our job harder. These are file-shredding utilities, which overwrite data numerous times making it impossible to recover the data. However, we often get some of the data back because users get lazy in using the shredding utility and some shredding utilities are not the best quality and do a horrible job.

Disk encryption > file shredding, 100 times over. Yes, BitLocker shouldn't be trusted because of the NSA, but, even if the NSA did backdoor it, it would still be impenetrable to standard law enforcement. Handwaving this problem away is either bluster or ignorance. Either way, he's a hack.

about two weeks ago
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Positive Ebola Test In Second Texas Health Worker

linuxrocks123 Re:Just tell me (463 comments)

This isn't the first ebola outbreak West Africa has had. It's not an especially "fast moving" disease, either. And "soldier on to what may be a post apocalyptic world" is a great way not to spread panic</sarcasm>. In the developed world, we can contain ebola. If it spreads past the infected Texas healthcare workers, that wouldn't be good, but the world's not ending.

Reading your post, I'm reminded of a Slashdot poster during the housing crisis who said he was betting with his investments on sustained, deep economic decline. I wonder how that worked out for him.

about two weeks ago
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Complain About Comcast, Get Fired From Your Job

linuxrocks123 Re:So, it has come to this. (742 comments)

Oh ... didn't see the joke. I see it now. Good one :)

about two weeks ago
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Complain About Comcast, Get Fired From Your Job

linuxrocks123 Re:So, it has come to this. (742 comments)

Settlements get recorded by the court as judgments. They pull that, he can go to the sheriff and take his pound of flesh in seized cable boxes from their local office.

about two weeks ago
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Complain About Comcast, Get Fired From Your Job

linuxrocks123 Re:So, it has come to this. (742 comments)

Glad he won at least. Harassment can cut across both genders. Too often people forget that.

about two weeks ago
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Complain About Comcast, Get Fired From Your Job

linuxrocks123 Re:So, it has come to this. (742 comments)

How much of an imbalance there is depends a lot on the labor market and the individual. The employer often doesn't know what imbalance, if any, exists, which helps the employee.

If I have a marketable degree, I can probably find another job soon. That reduces the imbalance of power.
If I have 2 years of savings, I don't have to find another job that soon. That reduces the imbalance of power.
If I have a good family safety net (i.e., spouse works), I don't have to find another job that soon. That reduces the imbalance of power.
If I'm working for minimum wage in a market where the salary would be below minimum wage without government intervention (so there is necessarily unemployment due to Economics 101), have a preexisting health condition pre-ACA and either health insurance through my job only or no health insurance at all, have no savings, no family, and live in an apartment where I need my very next paycheck for the rent, then there is quite an imbalance of power.

There are various ways and individual can help himself move from that bottom category to one of the other ones. There are various ways society can help people in the bottom category (but minimum wage IS NOT one of them). It's good to think about these things, because, yeah, some employment relationships can be pretty unfair. Unions aren't necessarily the answer, though. I personally think trying to reduce poverty more directly is a better tactic (basic income, etc.).

about two weeks ago
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A Production-Ready Flying Car Is Coming This Month

linuxrocks123 Re:Rules for aircraft are much stricter (203 comments)

"Half-blind" was intended to mean, "poor, uncorrectable vision in both eyes". Not being an eye doctor, I have no opinion on whether being blind in one eye but having perfect or perfectly correctable vision in the other eye would be an issue. It seems like it would because the second eye is what gives you depth perception, but maybe not, and, in any case, denying someone the right to drive, especially in the United States, is a very serious infringement on liberty by the state, so I'd probably agree with you that someone with one working eye should be allowed to drive if he is still able to demonstrate competence behind the wheel.

I wasn't necessarily saying I agree or disagree with lax regulations for driving. Since you brought up the topic, my main issue with driving in the US is lax penalties for intentionally doing unsafe things while driving. This includes driving while intoxicated (with alcohol or drugs), speeding, going so slow in the left lane as to cause a hazard because people try to pass you on the right, street racing, talking on the phone while driving, doing lipstick while driving, doing X while driving, etc. These violations, on a second offense at least, should result in at least a temporary license suspension. People can't control whether they're blind in one eye. People can control whether they talk on the phone.

But, back to the topic, all I was saying is that, as a society, we're likely to vote ourselves less safety and more freedom regarding the privilege of piloting airplanes if flying cars become a reality. Because that's what we've done with normal cars.

about two weeks ago
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Google's Security Guards Are Now Officially Google Employees

linuxrocks123 Re:Janitors and landscapers next? (134 comments)

Not sure, but I think Google does hire its chefs directly. I thought I saw a job posting for one once on Google's careers website, but I could be wrong.

about three weeks ago

Submissions

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Horrid Ruling in Oracle v. Google: APIs Are Copyrightable

linuxrocks123 linuxrocks123 writes  |  about 5 months ago

linuxrocks123 (905424) writes "This is an absolutely horrible ruling. If APIs are copyrightable, every Windows program could be held to infringe Microsoft's copyright. Every program written in Java needs permission from Oracle to be distributed. Video game console emulators are right out. And you can kiss things like third-party printer cartridges goodbye.

The only way it could be worse would be if they ruled that what Google did isn't fair use as a matter of law. If you read the decision, they almost did that, but didn't. I hope this is reheard en-banc or the Supreme Court takes the case. This is a nightmare.

I have very little respect for the Federal Circuit. They seem to cause many more problems than they solve. And, here, they took Ninth Circuit precedent and twisted it to say the opposite of what it meant. The Ninth Circuit gives interoperability concerns serious consideration; this decision gives them much less consideration than they deserve.

For Google's particular case, there looks to me to be an easy way out. All Google has to do is distribute its work under the GPL, since Java, including the APIs in question, is under the GPL anyway. The "Classpath exception" was Sun's explicit consent to use the APIs in Java without needing the work to be GPL as well. So, as long as Google distributes its work as a "modified version of OpenJDK", they should be good. I'm not sure why they haven't done this already, or didn't do it to begin with, actually. Perhaps I'm missing something, but I can't see what.

But this goes way beyond Android and Java. This ruling, if it's not overturned, could chill software development, promote extreme forms of vendor lock-in, and otherwise cause mayhem and misery."

Link to Original Source
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An OSS Solution to the Cold Boot Attack

linuxrocks123 linuxrocks123 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

linuxrocks123 writes "I am a graduate student at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and I've solved the cold boot attack, discussed on Slashdot back when the original paper on it was published. There have been some other attempts at solving this, but as far as I can tell, mine is the only one currently available with actual working code, OSS or otherwise. It comes with a small performance price (read the paper), but I've been using this on my machines for months and I really haven't noticed a significant slowdown in system performance. Get the code and paper from the university. Instructions for using the code on my blog."
Link to Original Source
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An OSS Solution to the Cold Boot Attack

linuxrocks123 linuxrocks123 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

linuxrocks123 writes "I am a graduate student at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. I wanted to keep this secret until I published this paper (it's just a tech report right now), but it got rejected once and I want people to be able to use this as soon as possible.

I've solved the cold boot attack, discussed here back when the original paper on it was published. There have been some other attempts at solving this, but as far as I can tell, mine is the only one currently available with actual working code, OSS or otherwise. It comes with a small performance price (read the paper), but I've been using this on my machines for months and I really haven't noticed a significant slowdown in system performance. Get the code and paper here. Instructions for using the code here."

Link to Original Source
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GPF Comics Seized by Copyright Gestapo

linuxrocks123 linuxrocks123 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

linuxrocks123 (905424) writes "In a move that would make GPF Comics villain Trudy Truehart proud, US Immigation and Customs Enforcement has apparently seized my favorite webcomic's domain name. A visit to http://gpf-comics.com/ currently shows that stupid "Domain Seized" template with the eagle in the middle looking like it's about to bite your face off. It's all speculation at this point as to why this was done: maybe it's a mistake, or maybe newspaper comic book artists just don't like competition. I assume we'll have more details — and a rehosted domain for GPF Comics — as this story develops."
Link to Original Source
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linuxrocks123 linuxrocks123 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

linuxrocks123 writes "It looks like Dell is joining Microsoft and Novell in their Linux patent pact. Dell is selling SuSE on servers, backed by Microsoft's Linux patent certificates. No response from Red Hat yet, but Dell claims to still be selling Red Hat servers despite the deal."

Journals

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Okay, people, this is starting to get scary.

linuxrocks123 linuxrocks123 writes  |  more than 8 years ago

A recent Slashdot article about CIA reclassification prompted a lot of comments suggesting that a majority of Slashdot posters may have some sort of mental illness. Like, maybe, paranoid schizophrenia. The idea seems to be that all large corporations and governments are absolutely and intractably evil. They think every other law is unconstitutional and that the Bill of Rights is meaningless today. Oh yeah, and China is going to kill the U.S. economy because it holds some U.S. bonds. That's another good one.

Of course, this isn't true; the government does some good things, businesses are subject to a LOT more regulation than they would like (and thus aren't in control of the government), free speech still exists in the U.S. (Why else is Michael Moore not in jail?), the Supreme Court still finds laws unconstitutional from time to time, and the worst China can do is stop buying our bonds, which would have a barely noticeable impact on the U.S. economy (China can't "call in our debt." Bonds don't work that way).

Posters also commonly conjure up images of a mythical medieval era, where kings reigned viciously over their subjects, but "things were done differently" with regard to the law, the principles of which were somehow nobler. They'll talk about some ancient legal principle (usually one that has become irrelevant to modern practice) or the wording on a subpoena and build an entire story out of it. I've seen this on Groklaw too, where it's even more scary. They're history is often wrong, and I don't know why they bring this up on a technology site. Perhaps it's another sign of a widespread delusion among the afflicted posters.

This isn't to say that these posters are stupid. Many intelligent people are also insane, and those skilled in mathematics seem particularly prone to mental illness (consider Cantor's fate). It's just a little scary to find that many in this crowd think so irrationally. I often find that the Wall Street Journal's arguments are orders of magnitude more well thought-out even when I don't agree with them.

Any comments from other posters noticing this bizarre phenomenon are welcome. Rants from those posters afflicted with some form of mental illness are also welcome, though not necessarily encouraged.

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GCC Port to the CLR

linuxrocks123 linuxrocks123 writes  |  more than 8 years ago

http://gcc-cil.blogspot.com/

I am VERY interested in this project. I think it's the coolest thing since Linux itself (and from my Slashdot username, you can see that that's saying something :).

I can't get it to work, though. Does anyone know if it supports languages other than C (I LOVE C++ so much it's not funny)? Would it be possible to call other languages, such as, for example, Java, from it (I like Java's built-in library for some things).

I don't have much compiler experience, but I think this project has much potential. The creator seems finished with it, though, so I think it's up to us to extend it. It would be a real shame if the code ends up going nowhere because it's so incomplete that the GCC developers have no use for it.

By the way, I don't have bad karma anymore, which is a Good Thing since posting at zero was really starting to get annoying. Whoever modded my recent comments up, thank you.

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I have bad karma now...

linuxrocks123 linuxrocks123 writes  |  more than 8 years ago

As of this posting, my third and second most recent comments were moderated from 1 to 0. I think arminw did it since I listed him as a foe for a while because I didn't want to listen to his lunatic, anarchist ranting. He's not my foe anymore because most of his posts don't seem to have much to do with politics and he seems otherwise sane and worth reading.

Still, with only a cumulative -2 moderation, probably because of that as*hole arminw, I have bad karma. Whatever. I deleted the +1 karma bonus modifier from my preferences to weed out karma whores.

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