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Comments

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A 24-Year-Old Scammed Apple 42 Times In 16 Different States

linuxrocks123 Re:$7142.85 (336 comments)

If you try to make your own Subway sandwich, you'll end up spending more than $5. Comparing whether you can build EXACTLY the same thing is a fool's game. The correct comparison is building something of roughly equivalent power.

3 hours ago
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A 24-Year-Old Scammed Apple 42 Times In 16 Different States

linuxrocks123 Re:$7142.85 (336 comments)

I had a power supply on my Lenovo go bad by the tip of it PHYSICALLY BECOMING DISCONNECTED FROM THE WIRE. Messed up my laptop so it randomly turns off now. I needed to replace the computer. Mad as hell.

4 hours ago
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Linus Torvalds: "GCC 4.9.0 Seems To Be Terminally Broken"

linuxrocks123 Re:I know you're trying to be funny, but... (704 comments)

I hadn't thought of that. You'd need to be telling the compiler, "focus on space to the complete exclusion of execution speed", but you're right. I'd call that a pathological case, though.

yesterday
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Linus Torvalds: "GCC 4.9.0 Seems To Be Terminally Broken"

linuxrocks123 Re:I know you're trying to be funny, but... (704 comments)

We really don't, actually. I mean, yes regarding employment -- if you're worth it, people will put up with you, but you'd be MORE valuable and probably PAID more if you were less "high maintenance" -- but not with the law. Look at Justin Bieber, for instance. Having money can unfortunately help with legal issues, so it may look like we go easy on celebrities, but, if anything, politically motivated prosecutors probably like the publicity they get for being "tough" on people who think they're "above the law".

2 days ago
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Linus Torvalds: "GCC 4.9.0 Seems To Be Terminally Broken"

linuxrocks123 Re:I know you're trying to be funny, but... (704 comments)

Yes, GCC has bugs. So do ALL optimizing compilers.

GCC, relative to other compilers, has a pretty good track record of stability, actually. Try using the Intel compiler sometime. I used it for 20 minutes and it segfaulted on me. That's better than generating incorrect code, I'll grant you, but damn.

I'm not saying GCC didn't do something very wrong in this instance ... spilling immediates is insane by itself ... but compilers are hard, and GCC is a solid one overall.

2 days ago
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Sexual Harassment Is Common In Scientific Fieldwork

linuxrocks123 Re:Such harassment (362 comments)

Whether such such trifling "transgressions" are bad or not really depends on the intent and the circumstances. If someone goes up to a female coworker every day and makes jokes about how women are stupid, then, yeah, that's pretty bad, and it needs to stop. The guy is being a jerk. It's not as bad as rape. It is bullying.

To me, it's not especially heinous because it's "sexual". It's on the level of going over to the system administrator's desk every day and making jokes about nerds playing sports poorly. It's harassment. It's bullying. There's something wrong with you if you're doing that to people, but no one is getting raped.

If it's people making jokes with each other because they're teasing each other because they're friends, then that's totally different and it's completely okay. But if someone doesn't like being teased, and makes that known, it will stop on its own in that case without outside intervention. But if it's really that horrible for you to be teased a little by someone with no ill intent toward you, you're extremely thin-skinned and there's something wrong with you (though not nearly as much as with the bullies in the previous paragraph).

So, basically, it all boils down to intent, and, for this stuff, in the case where something bad is going on, the "harassment" part is much more important than the "sexual" part. The only reason anyone cares about the sexual part at all is because lawyers and thin-skinned feminazis who want to be offended about something.

Now, for the more serious stuff: if people are getting raped in the workplace, then that's absurdly horrible, I can't imagine /HOW/ that's even happening because aren't there other people around?, and people need to go to jail. But I can't imagine people actually raping each other in the workplace often because in most workplaces I'm familiar with it would be pretty hard to have /consensual/ sex without getting caught and fired. But, I've never been on an archeological dig, so maybe I'm missing something.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Future-Proof Jobs?

linuxrocks123 Re:Simple (509 comments)

Here's one way to get by without student loans: be a dental hygienist and save your money, then when you have enough, go to college. You'll need two years of community college and you'll need to take a licensing exam. You'll also need to put your hands in people's mouths eight hours a day, but you'll have gloves. There are other ways to bootstrap yourself; you just have to look.

http://www.ada.org/en/home-ada...

I stand by my statement that taking out student loans is an incredibly risky thing to do. Yeah, you can do it and have everything work out. It can also fuck up your financial future more than if you took out a mortgage, bought a house, set it on fire (accidentally) without having insurance, maxed out all your credit cards, and then wrecked your Tesla which you took out a car note to buy (and didn't have collision coverage for). Is "never" too strong? I don't think so.

"Completely and totally financially secure" was meant in a relative sense. Even the 1% aren't completely and totally financially secure, as the French Revolution demonstrated. What I meant to say was done with your education, settled into your career, in a marriage you expect to last, that type of thing.

Finally, in modern times, unless you're a subsistence farmer, children are, objectively, a burden. For some people, the burden is worth it because they enjoy having children. Pets are also a burden. Maintaining a boat is a burden. Owning and maintaining a house is a burden. Most things in life are optional, and the optional bits often come with costs of time and money. Those costs we can refer to as burdens. Just because something is a burden doesn't mean you shouldn't do it. It just means you should do a cost/benefit analysis beforehand.

Oh, and, yeah, cars suck. You're right on that.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Future-Proof Jobs?

linuxrocks123 Re:Simple (509 comments)

Fairly good list, but I'd take issue with a few things:

Never own a credit card. They are all scams and are far more likely to ruin your credit than help it.

I strongly disagree with this. Credit cards aren't scams. The problem is that people use them irresponsibly. The best way to treat credit cards is as charge cards: you pay the entire balance at the end of the month and only rarely and only for very good reason ever use the high-interest line of credit the cards give you. It's much better to use credit cards than debit cards as the credit cards offer stronger protection against liability for identity theft, and it's better to use credit cards than cash because cards are simply more convenient. As long as you pay off the balance every month, you don't get shafted. Now, if you don't have the self-control to do that, then, sure, don't get them, just like if you don't have the self-control not to get yourself shit-faced drunk every time you see a container of alcohol you shouldn't keep alcohol in your house. But, in both these cases, the first attempt at solving the problem should be gaining self-control rather than avoiding the underlying issue by treating the symptom.

The difference between a 401k and a Roth IRA, and why you need both and why paying off your house before retirement is bad.

Well, you missed Roth 401(k)s and traditional IRAs. Give those some love, too. It's usually only better to use Roth vehicles when you're young or, for whatever reason, not making much money, and, in that case, you should double down and use Roth everything. Regarding paying off your house, yes, sometimes it's best to hold onto a mortgage, but it's also sometimes not, so you need to learn how to do the calculations. Remember, any money paid past the minimum payment on a mortgage goes straight to the principal, and you'll never pay interest on that portion of the principal again. That's a pretty good reason to make extra payments, and the mortgage deduction is sometimes a red herring because you lose your entire standard deduction by taking "advantage" of it.

The last thing I'd like to mention is a really, really important thing I think you left out: never take out student loans. Again:

NEVER. TAKE. OUT. STUDENT. LOANS.

Taking out student loans is 50 times more risky than taking out a credit card. If you fuck yourself up with a credit card, you get to declare bankruptcy and erase the debt. If you fuck yourself up with a student loan, you're an indentured servant until you pay it back. It's that bad. I don't care how low the interest is. I don't care how much money you THINK you'll be making when you graduate. It's never worth the risk, and you should never do it, whoever you are and whatever your situation is. If you can't afford college, go to a community college, get an Associate's degree, and work in data entry or something until you can afford college. Taking Pell grants, or other grants, or scholarships is great, and you should try to do well in high school both to get some merit-based scholarships and to get AP credits that I know from personal experience can let you do a 4-year degree in 3 years. But never student loans. THOSE are scams.

Oh, and one last thing: don't fuck yourself up by having a kid until you are completely and totally financially secure. Just don't.

---linuxrocks123

about two weeks ago
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Here Comes the Panopticon: Insurance Companies

linuxrocks123 Re:Magical Pixie Horse (353 comments)

It's not just health: auto insurance is the same way, probably to reduce people driving uninsured. Look up "assigned risk pools".

about three weeks ago
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Qualcomm Takes Down 100+ GitHub Repositories With DMCA Notice

linuxrocks123 Re:On this 4th of July... (349 comments)

An argument like that, assuming it's not true, would be perjury and fraud. If mistaken licensing did occur, you can be fairly certain the company would publicize exactly what happened far and wide immediately after they found out the "rogue licensor" had acted. Saying nothing and then suing you and only telling you in court that the licensing was a mistake would not be looked on kindly.

about three weeks ago
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Qualcomm Takes Down 100+ GitHub Repositories With DMCA Notice

linuxrocks123 Re:On this 4th of July... (349 comments)

You could represent yourself in a clear-cut case like this, where the files are obviously properly licensed. If you give them notice of the licensing in your counter-notice, and they still sue, they could get in trouble for filing a frivolous lawsuit, and you could recover damages.

about three weeks ago
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Qualcomm Takes Down 100+ GitHub Repositories With DMCA Notice

linuxrocks123 Re:On this 4th of July... (349 comments)

You're wrong. Lawsuits cost money for anyone and companies don't "automatically" file them. There's such a thing as a frivolous lawsuit, and lawyers can get in trouble for filing them as well as the organizations paying the lawyers.

about three weeks ago
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Qualcomm Takes Down 100+ GitHub Repositories With DMCA Notice

linuxrocks123 Re:On this 4th of July... (349 comments)

In such a clear-cut case as obviously GPL-licensed files, you could represent yourself and not pay a cent. You wouldn't lose: you'd get discovery from the Linux Foundation or whoever indicating the code was GPL-licensed. And you could probably retaliate and sue them for filing a frivolous lawsuit.

about three weeks ago
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The Profoundly Weird, Gender-Specific Roots of the Turing Test

linuxrocks123 Re:How is that stranger? (136 comments)

Evolutionary psychology is approximately the definition of soft science. And no I'm not going to make the argument here; look in my comment history if you care enough.

About 10% of the population has a reproductive strategy that will never succeed because they're doing it with the same gender. That alone should tell you that normal variation is going to outweigh differences in statistical averages. If that's not enough, consider that multiple times throughout history women have been able to join the military pretending to be men and not get found out for months or years.

about a month and a half ago
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The Profoundly Weird, Gender-Specific Roots of the Turing Test

linuxrocks123 Re:How is that stranger? (136 comments)

I have never once bored a hole through something by spinning rapidly while bashing my head against it.

Awww, MAN... You haven't LIVED!

about a month and a half ago
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Wikipedia Mining Algorithm Reveals the Most Influential People In History

linuxrocks123 Re:Carl Linnaeus? Here's why: (231 comments)

For anyone reading this, I can confirm parent is full of shit. The Wikipedia article contains no references whatsoever to Roman court records verifying the existence of Jesus.

about 1 month ago
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Wikipedia Mining Algorithm Reveals the Most Influential People In History

linuxrocks123 Re:Carl Linnaeus? Here's why: (231 comments)

The TLDR was for you (or another reader), not for me. I DR.

Your comment is the first I've heard of Roman court records existing. That's neither in the Wikipedia article nor in anything I've come across. Where is your source for these records existing? If they exist and are genuine, the citation I gave would be intellectually dishonest for not dealing with them, and I'll have to revisit my conclusions.

Your argument that I should believe no one ever existed is a strawman; the evidence for Jesus's existence (assuming we don't have court records -- somebody should add that to the Wikipedia article; between us, you should do the honors) is about on par with other legendary figures. I'm skeptical that Jesus, King Arthur, Odysseus, or Aeneus ever existed. Pilate, on the other hand, we have direct archeological evidence for, so there was some guy named Pilate who administered Judaea. There was also a guy named Julius Caesar who became dictator of Rome and was then assassinated by some senators. There's lots of people in history we can be 99.9% sure existed. Jesus of Nazareth isn't one of them.

about 1 month ago
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Wikipedia Mining Algorithm Reveals the Most Influential People In History

linuxrocks123 Re:Carl Linnaeus? Here's why: (231 comments)

And you should learn to look past appeals to authority and study the actual subjects of your interest. The giant flaming box at the top of the wiki page saying, "The neutrality of this article is disputed" should have been your first clue to dig a little deeper:

http://rationalrevolution.net/...

TLDR version: We've got Tacitus incorrectly parroting the Christian myth saying that "Christus" was crucified. We know he was just parroting what Christians told him or the authorities, and did not actually verify the tale, because "Christus" was not a correct name for Jesus, so the Roman archives wouldn't have his crucifixion recorded under that name, so he couldn't have verified the story. We also have an obviously inauthentic passage by Josephus. It may be forged, as THE ORIGINAL PROTESTANTS THOUGHT THE CATHOLICS DID, or it may be a mistakenly inserted marginal/interlinear note, which was a common form of transcription corruption.

And that's it. That's all that ties Jesus to history. To me it's not much better than nothing. And there are also positive arguments, not just negative ones, against Jesus's historicity, which I won't get into here. But Tacitus and the (inauthentic, but apologists argue only partially inauthentic) Josephus passage are just enough that, if you're an apologist, you can scrape together a fig leaf from it that other apologists might believe. I guess they have to. After all, their imaginary friend has to have been real, right?

about 2 months ago
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Misogyny, Entitlement, and Nerds

linuxrocks123 Re:#notallgeekyguys (1198 comments)

Some feminists do sometimes make absurd arguments any accusation of rape should be believed, but the standard in any court is still reasonable doubt. Almost certainly, a smart woman trying to make a rape accusation against a long-time partner stick would admit to the prior relationship because attempting to deny it would destroy all her credibility.

Then, it would come down to he said / she said. You'd probably want to introduce evidence indicating why all of a sudden your girlfriend is claiming you raped her. Evidence of any mental disorders she had would probably be admissible. Details of her prior sexual history would likely be admissible (see why many actual rapes might be unreported?). If you cheated on her and she found out, you'd want to introduce evidence of that. If you recently broke up with her, you'd want to introduce evidence of that. Anything that might give her a motivation to make a false accusation against you to hurt you.

If she all of a sudden, with no motivation whatsoever, claimed you raped her, then you might be in trouble, because why the hell would she do that? On the other hand, you might not be, because why the hell would you rape someone you routinely had consensual sex with anyway? The answer is that rape's not really sexual, it's more extreme bullying / wanting to dominate someone. So you'd want character witnesses that you're a nice guy and that she's a vindictive asshole.

Either way, in a trial like that, both your names would likely be dragged through the mud in public. It would be a nightmare for both of you. And, since he said / she said usually isn't enough for "beyond reasonable doubt", she'd probably lose. This is the basis for the claim that many rapes go unreported. It's probably true. Why would a rational, self-interested person want to drag her own name through the mud to hurt someone else? The only reasons for doing something like that would be to be vindictive -- "I don't care if I get hurt too as long as he does!" -- and altruistic -- "I want to stop him from hurting anyone else." For most people, both of these motivations are better for driving actions of minor consequence than actions of major consequence.

about 2 months ago

Submissions

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Horrid Ruling in Oracle v. Google: APIs Are Copyrightable

linuxrocks123 linuxrocks123 writes  |  about 3 months ago

linuxrocks123 (905424) writes "This is an absolutely horrible ruling. If APIs are copyrightable, every Windows program could be held to infringe Microsoft's copyright. Every program written in Java needs permission from Oracle to be distributed. Video game console emulators are right out. And you can kiss things like third-party printer cartridges goodbye.

The only way it could be worse would be if they ruled that what Google did isn't fair use as a matter of law. If you read the decision, they almost did that, but didn't. I hope this is reheard en-banc or the Supreme Court takes the case. This is a nightmare.

I have very little respect for the Federal Circuit. They seem to cause many more problems than they solve. And, here, they took Ninth Circuit precedent and twisted it to say the opposite of what it meant. The Ninth Circuit gives interoperability concerns serious consideration; this decision gives them much less consideration than they deserve.

For Google's particular case, there looks to me to be an easy way out. All Google has to do is distribute its work under the GPL, since Java, including the APIs in question, is under the GPL anyway. The "Classpath exception" was Sun's explicit consent to use the APIs in Java without needing the work to be GPL as well. So, as long as Google distributes its work as a "modified version of OpenJDK", they should be good. I'm not sure why they haven't done this already, or didn't do it to begin with, actually. Perhaps I'm missing something, but I can't see what.

But this goes way beyond Android and Java. This ruling, if it's not overturned, could chill software development, promote extreme forms of vendor lock-in, and otherwise cause mayhem and misery."

Link to Original Source
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An OSS Solution to the Cold Boot Attack

linuxrocks123 linuxrocks123 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

linuxrocks123 writes "I am a graduate student at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and I've solved the cold boot attack, discussed on Slashdot back when the original paper on it was published. There have been some other attempts at solving this, but as far as I can tell, mine is the only one currently available with actual working code, OSS or otherwise. It comes with a small performance price (read the paper), but I've been using this on my machines for months and I really haven't noticed a significant slowdown in system performance. Get the code and paper from the university. Instructions for using the code on my blog."
Link to Original Source
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An OSS Solution to the Cold Boot Attack

linuxrocks123 linuxrocks123 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

linuxrocks123 writes "I am a graduate student at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. I wanted to keep this secret until I published this paper (it's just a tech report right now), but it got rejected once and I want people to be able to use this as soon as possible.

I've solved the cold boot attack, discussed here back when the original paper on it was published. There have been some other attempts at solving this, but as far as I can tell, mine is the only one currently available with actual working code, OSS or otherwise. It comes with a small performance price (read the paper), but I've been using this on my machines for months and I really haven't noticed a significant slowdown in system performance. Get the code and paper here. Instructions for using the code here."

Link to Original Source
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GPF Comics Seized by Copyright Gestapo

linuxrocks123 linuxrocks123 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

linuxrocks123 (905424) writes "In a move that would make GPF Comics villain Trudy Truehart proud, US Immigation and Customs Enforcement has apparently seized my favorite webcomic's domain name. A visit to http://gpf-comics.com/ currently shows that stupid "Domain Seized" template with the eagle in the middle looking like it's about to bite your face off. It's all speculation at this point as to why this was done: maybe it's a mistake, or maybe newspaper comic book artists just don't like competition. I assume we'll have more details — and a rehosted domain for GPF Comics — as this story develops."
Link to Original Source
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linuxrocks123 linuxrocks123 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

linuxrocks123 writes "It looks like Dell is joining Microsoft and Novell in their Linux patent pact. Dell is selling SuSE on servers, backed by Microsoft's Linux patent certificates. No response from Red Hat yet, but Dell claims to still be selling Red Hat servers despite the deal."

Journals

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Okay, people, this is starting to get scary.

linuxrocks123 linuxrocks123 writes  |  more than 8 years ago

A recent Slashdot article about CIA reclassification prompted a lot of comments suggesting that a majority of Slashdot posters may have some sort of mental illness. Like, maybe, paranoid schizophrenia. The idea seems to be that all large corporations and governments are absolutely and intractably evil. They think every other law is unconstitutional and that the Bill of Rights is meaningless today. Oh yeah, and China is going to kill the U.S. economy because it holds some U.S. bonds. That's another good one.

Of course, this isn't true; the government does some good things, businesses are subject to a LOT more regulation than they would like (and thus aren't in control of the government), free speech still exists in the U.S. (Why else is Michael Moore not in jail?), the Supreme Court still finds laws unconstitutional from time to time, and the worst China can do is stop buying our bonds, which would have a barely noticeable impact on the U.S. economy (China can't "call in our debt." Bonds don't work that way).

Posters also commonly conjure up images of a mythical medieval era, where kings reigned viciously over their subjects, but "things were done differently" with regard to the law, the principles of which were somehow nobler. They'll talk about some ancient legal principle (usually one that has become irrelevant to modern practice) or the wording on a subpoena and build an entire story out of it. I've seen this on Groklaw too, where it's even more scary. They're history is often wrong, and I don't know why they bring this up on a technology site. Perhaps it's another sign of a widespread delusion among the afflicted posters.

This isn't to say that these posters are stupid. Many intelligent people are also insane, and those skilled in mathematics seem particularly prone to mental illness (consider Cantor's fate). It's just a little scary to find that many in this crowd think so irrationally. I often find that the Wall Street Journal's arguments are orders of magnitude more well thought-out even when I don't agree with them.

Any comments from other posters noticing this bizarre phenomenon are welcome. Rants from those posters afflicted with some form of mental illness are also welcome, though not necessarily encouraged.

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GCC Port to the CLR

linuxrocks123 linuxrocks123 writes  |  more than 8 years ago

http://gcc-cil.blogspot.com/

I am VERY interested in this project. I think it's the coolest thing since Linux itself (and from my Slashdot username, you can see that that's saying something :).

I can't get it to work, though. Does anyone know if it supports languages other than C (I LOVE C++ so much it's not funny)? Would it be possible to call other languages, such as, for example, Java, from it (I like Java's built-in library for some things).

I don't have much compiler experience, but I think this project has much potential. The creator seems finished with it, though, so I think it's up to us to extend it. It would be a real shame if the code ends up going nowhere because it's so incomplete that the GCC developers have no use for it.

By the way, I don't have bad karma anymore, which is a Good Thing since posting at zero was really starting to get annoying. Whoever modded my recent comments up, thank you.

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I have bad karma now...

linuxrocks123 linuxrocks123 writes  |  more than 8 years ago

As of this posting, my third and second most recent comments were moderated from 1 to 0. I think arminw did it since I listed him as a foe for a while because I didn't want to listen to his lunatic, anarchist ranting. He's not my foe anymore because most of his posts don't seem to have much to do with politics and he seems otherwise sane and worth reading.

Still, with only a cumulative -2 moderation, probably because of that as*hole arminw, I have bad karma. Whatever. I deleted the +1 karma bonus modifier from my preferences to weed out karma whores.

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