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Ask Slashdot: How Do I Make a High-Spec PC Waterproof?

localroger Pelican Case + Thermostatic Heater (199 comments)

Double enclosed is best, but you probably don't have room for that. I've been putting stuff in food processing plants for 20+ years though where the conditions (especially during cleanup) are comparable. Find the smallest Pelican case (there are generic knockoffs, if you go with one check it thoroughly before trusting it) and equip it with a thermostatic heater to keep the temperature above 70F or so all the time to limit condensation. Pack in a big bag of dessicant because without double enclosure that still won't be perfect.

4 days ago
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If Fusion Is the Answer, We Need To Do It Quickly

localroger The word is "neutrons." (305 comments)

Although there is some lip service to seeking "aneutronic" fusion the truth is that fusion is so hard to achieve that we don't have the luxury of being picky about the reactions we aim for, and all the practical ones generate a metric fuckton of neutrons, enough to be lethal even on the other side of thick shielding, enough to induce dangerous secondary radioactivity in many elements, and enough to knock enough atoms out of their place in metal crystalline lattices to seroiusly weaken structures made from elements that dont' become radioactive too. It's a serious enough problem that the first and most important clue that Pons and Fleischmann had not achieved cold fusion was that they were still alive.

about 2 months ago
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U.S. Supreme Court Upholds Religious Objections To Contraception

localroger Maybe same chemicals, but not $20 (1330 comments)

As I replied below, my wife was on the PIll for 30 years. If there was a cheaper alternative I'd know about it.

about 4 months ago
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U.S. Supreme Court Upholds Religious Objections To Contraception

localroger Great idea! Not only that... (1330 comments)

...there is no danger of pregnancy when the cucumber loses its cool and rapes you.

about 4 months ago
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U.S. Supreme Court Upholds Religious Objections To Contraception

localroger In the US, insurance is a racket (1330 comments)

Nearly everything is much cheaper to an insurance company than it is for you if you walk in the pharmacy and pay for it out of pocket. By not being able to get it on insurance, you lose that discount. Not that it should be that way, but that's how it is, and often that discount is 70% or more because of some foolishness called "differential pricing" instead of by its proper name, "theft."

about 4 months ago
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U.S. Supreme Court Upholds Religious Objections To Contraception

localroger More like $50/month in the US (1330 comments)

My wife has been on the Pill for 30 years. Believe me, if there were a cheaper option I'd know about it.

about 4 months ago
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U.S. Supreme Court Upholds Religious Objections To Contraception

localroger Not in the US. (1330 comments)

The most common birth control pill in use in the US costs USD$50 a month not counting the mandatory prescriptions. Many countries do sell them cheaper -- but not in the US, and they are never OTC here. Although free clinics do sometimes hand out Plan B I have never heard of one that dispenses regular non-emergency contraception. And this is where the ruling in question applies.

about 4 months ago
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U.S. Supreme Court Upholds Religious Objections To Contraception

localroger Lots of people can't afford a movie a week (1330 comments)

Particularly a $12 movie, which is what they would have to cost to equal the cost of the Pill. (Not counting the mandatory biannual medical exams, without which you can't get a prescription.) Ginsberg noted in her dissent that the cost of an IUD is comparable to a month's salary for a person making minimum wage. Then again, I'm sure you'll also agree that the cost of your own vaccines and blood transfusions are also reasonable when those folks start claiming their exemption under this stupid ruling.

about 4 months ago
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US Marshals Seize Police Stingray Records To Keep Them From the ACLU

localroger An old neighbor said 5 = bad cop (272 comments)

He himself retired from the redacted state police after 12 years, some spent undercover. He said that for the most part the idealists who want to save the world get washed out by the corruption by 5 years and anyone who's stayed longer than that is getting more out of it than their salary.

about 5 months ago
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Grace Hopper, UNIVAC, and the First Programming Language

localroger Not really (137 comments)

Your 8080 didn't spend most of its time waiting for instructions to pop out of the end of its delay line memory. (My first computer was also powered by an 8080, represent.)

about 5 months ago
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Meet Canada's Goosebuster Drone

localroger This might work for awhile (74 comments)

It will stop working when the geese realize that the drones never eat a goose and can be safely ignored.

about 5 months ago
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Obama Says He May Or May Not Let the NSA Exploit the Next Heartbleed

localroger This has nothing to do with Snowden etc. (134 comments)

I'm fully with the "buck stops here" theory of governance. The problem is that this isn't even a buck. How, exactly, do you think that the information that an exploit like Heartbleed exists migrates in a compartmentalized agency like the NSA from the group that identifies it to use in spying to the group that perhaps looks to protect us from foreign spies? How does it migrate to top administration? The answer is that it doesn't. It can't. Maybe it should, but as the NSA (and probably any practially workable version of it) exists there simply is no channel for that information to move from those who are using it to others who might have a need, on wholly different merits, to know it.

It is very unlikely that the guys who discovered Heartbleed as a SIGINT opportunity had any channels at all to warn other arms of the agency that it might be a vulnerability on our side; consider how such channels could and would be misused in so many other situations. The spooks would never implement such a thing. From the SIGINT side Heartbleed is a low-level technical detail, hardly worth the attention of a Civil Service level adminstrator except for the ops that it makes possible.

about 7 months ago
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Obama Says He May Or May Not Let the NSA Exploit the Next Heartbleed

localroger The President doesn't micro-manage this stuff (134 comments)

Really, anybody who thinks anybody cabinet level or higher even knows about this kind of logistical detail is an idiot. This isn't at all like the torture thing which is a basic human rights violation; nobody is questioning the NSA's right to spy on certain people, and this has nothing to do with any accusation that they're spying on people they shouldn't be spying on. This is about technological implementation, and it's part of NSA's purview as a spy agency to explore technologies that further their ability to do their job. Part of that is discovering weaknesses in cryptographic systems which are trusted by the people you want to spy on. Having discovered such a useful weakness they aren't obliged to report it, although they are obliged not to use it (or any of their other techniques) against our own citizens.

about 7 months ago
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How Cochlear Implants Are Being Blamed For Killing Deaf Culture

localroger Re:In a cochlear implant users own words: (510 comments)

El Rushbo's deafness isn't natural, it's the result of adult opioid abuse, so the treatment may be different than for non drug-addicts who are just naturally deaf.

about 7 months ago
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The Rescue Plan That Could Have Saved Space Shuttle Columbia

localroger If you have a time machine with a short range (247 comments)

...of only a few days, then this would be quite useful. You could get Denzel Washington in onthe project somehow.

about 8 months ago
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The Neuroscience of Computer Programming

localroger I have always felt coding was a language skill (161 comments)

Even though computer languages are different from human languages in major and universal ways we do use the same mental muscles to comprehend computer languages as we do human ones. This is also why it is much easier for children who are exposed to programming early to pick up the knack than it is if they aren't introduced to coding until they are adults.

While computer languages are about math a lot more than human languages, coding isn't really like doing math. It's more like telling the machine how to do math, which the machine then does for you.

about 8 months ago
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'The Color Run' Violates Agreement With College Photographer, Then Sues Him

localroger Re:Trademark powers? -- NO. (218 comments)

This is all actually fairly straightforward if a little weird under boilerplate copyright law. First, lacking model releases of his own, Jackson cannot use the photos for commercial purposes. He could use them as part of a portfolio but as soon as he puts one on a billboard or in an ad, he needs permission from the individuals who are identifiable in the image, which he doesn't have. Second, in the absence of a contract Jackson owns the images, full stop. Nobody can put them on a billboard without his permission. He gave permission to put them on Facebook, but the going rate for use on billboards and in ads is much higher. $100K is not unreasonable for the level of use that has been demonstrated. Third, Color Run almost certainly has a model release embedded in the paperwork the runners sign to enter the race, so they have the right on that count to use the pictures. They would be OK if they compensated Jackson, but they are not OK if they do not compensate Jackson. This is the ONLY way it is OK to put those pictures on billboards -- Jackson has to give permission to do so, for which he deserves much more compensation than he would get for use on Facebook, and Color Run has to do the publishing because they have the model releases. The Color Run people are way out of line here and probably indulging in a snit because their authoritah was disrespected. But they are very clearly in the wrong. As for trademark, that's completely irrelevant, since Jackson has no right to publish the pictures commercially without the model releases that Color Run has. However, Jackson DOES have certain Fair Use rights, such as releasing a few examples in the course of presenting his side of this story, as long as there is no danger of the images being misinterpreted as a commercial representation by Color Run themselves and as long as they serve certain alternate purposes, for which "news" qualifies.

about 8 months ago
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Customer: Dell Denies Speaker Repair Under Warranty, Blames VLC

localroger XP doesn't allow hardware access either (526 comments)

The 16-bit Windows -- 3.x, 95, 98, and ME -- allow DOS style direct hardware access for things like sound and serial hardware. The Windows NT derivatives including NT, 2000, XP, Vista, 7, and 8 do not allow application program access to hardware at all due to the underlying security model.

about 9 months ago
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Metal-Free 'Rhubarb' Battery Could Store Renewable Grid Energy

localroger It's not for cars (131 comments)

For grid storage your battery will be a building. It can be as large as necessary; it's the price of the infrastructure and reactant to store and re-create enough energy to get the solar farm past a rainy day which are limits.

about 10 months ago
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Metal-Free 'Rhubarb' Battery Could Store Renewable Grid Energy

localroger It's not about density (131 comments)

It's about storing a large amount of energy in a very large amount of electrolyte without similarly large plates and electrical connections. For power storage they are thinking in terms of batteries the size of buildings, perhaps built like current sewerage-treatment plants, to store energy in the electrolyte and move it along, bringing it back to the electrical assembly with pumps as needed. It can be considerably less energy-dense than current batteries in pounds per erg and still be far more practical for the kind of large-scale storage the tech is aimed at.

about 10 months ago

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