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Firefox Signs Five-Year Deal With Yahoo, Drops Google as Default Search Engine

machineghost Re:XSS - Google in a Frame (395 comments)

I don't think Yahoo actually wants to be a search engine. I think they just want people to look at their ads.

Yup, which is why they've licensed someone else's tech to power the searches for most of the company's history.

By partnering with a browser: they can run searches through Google's servers but strip the Google Adword adds and replace them with Yahoo Ads.

Wait, what? You think Yahoo is going to use Google to power their search engine, without paying them? And you think Google's lawyers (let alone their technical team) would really let that fly?

about a week ago
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Coding Bootcamps Presented As "College Alternative"

machineghost Re:Like the world needs more web monkeys ... (226 comments)

... because learning skills at a bootcamp makes you incapable of learning skills on your own in the real world? Or because computer science degrees somehow teach you to read blogs and subscribe to RSS feeds?

about a week ago
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Coding Bootcamps Presented As "College Alternative"

machineghost Re: Like the world needs more web monkeys ... (226 comments)

... and what do any of the things you just mentioned have to do with typical JavaScript programming? Just because someone wouldn't be good at doing your particular job doesn't mean they're bad at other programming jobs: you could just as easily dismiss any Java programmer, no matter what their skill level, for not knowing how to manage memory.

about a week ago
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Coding Bootcamps Presented As "College Alternative"

machineghost Re:Like the world needs more web monkeys ... (226 comments)

I'd say at least 80% (maybe 90+%) of the stuff you listed has no applicability for a front-end JavaScript programmer. Which isn't to say JavaScript programming is easy: there's a whole lot of art and craft to being a good JavaScript programmer, and a boot camp won't teach it all. But as for all the traditional CS bits you listed, almost none of them contribute to being a good JavaScript programmer.

What a good front-end programmer needs is understanding of the JavaScript language, of how the DOM works, of how browsers render pages, etc. And for serious JavaScript programming you need to know object-oriented programming and all that good stuff too ... but you don't need "database theory", "microprocessor systems", or "artificial intelligence".

about a week ago
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Coding Bootcamps Presented As "College Alternative"

machineghost Re:Lovin' that smell of BIAS (226 comments)

Self-taught programmers are motivated by curiosity; webmonkeys are motivated by "oh shiny" - which is why they concentrate so much on "oh shiny". And when they get stYuck because they're way out of their depth, who do you think they call ... (hint - not another web monkey).

I'm sure that's based on lots of empirical evidence from your experience working with bootcamp graduates, and not just you spouting your own prejudices, right? Because I would think that someone who's worked with a boot camp graduate for 6+ months and is about to hire another one *might* just know more than someone who's never even met a bootcamp graduate ...

Of course, we never recognize paradigm shifts until they're almost over.

People are moving away from browsers without even noticing it

So, what are they going to do? Take another boot camp to learn XCode? Java? C/C++ (yes, back-end services use c and c++).

You're completely right: the web is just a fad, JavaScript is going away soon and there will be no more jobs for JavaScript programmers in a few years.

about a week ago
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Coding Bootcamps Presented As "College Alternative"

machineghost Re:Like the world needs more web monkeys ... (226 comments)

You're assuming such boot camps only produce "monkeys", which is false. These people work twelve hour days, seven days a week, for three months: compare that to your typical CS graduate who's maybe had a month total of relevant programming experience.

In fact, we hired a boot camp graduate about half a year ago, and she's been awesome. WAY more knowledgeable about programming than other candidates we considered, including CS graduates.

about a week ago
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Coding Bootcamps Presented As "College Alternative"

machineghost Re:yaaaaaaay... (226 comments)

Actually, we're a serious thick-client shop with a single-page all-Javascript application powered by Backbone, and we've had great success hiring a Boot Camp graduate. She definitely does *not* just copy/paste code snippets without understanding how things work. To the contrary, she knows far more about the language and basic theory than most other applicants we've seen (including ones with CS degrees), and we've in fact had so much success with her that we're planning to hire another boot camp graduate shortly.

about a week ago
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Mozilla Launches Browser Built For Developers

machineghost Re:I like the idea.. (74 comments)

This, except the part about giving it a try. Firebug revolutionized everything when it first came out, but it's failed to improve in the way Chrome Developer Tools ... and Firefox's own developer tools have remained far behind both the entire time.

After ignoring the web development community for so long, I have a hard time seeing myself ever going back to Firefox unless they get some *seriously* rave reviews.

about two weeks ago
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Virginia Court: LEOs Can Force You To Provide Fingerprint To Unlock Your Phone

machineghost Duh (328 comments)

Police have been collecting finger prints for decades, and they have caught thousands, if not millions, of criminals they otherwise wouldn't have caught as a result.

All this judge said was that you using your fingerprint on your phone doesn't give you a "get out of fingerprinting free" card when you get arrested. If it did every criminal in America would lock their phone with a fingerprint so they didn't have to get fingerprinted.

about three weeks ago
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Lava Flow In Hawaii Gains Speed, Triggers Methane Explosions

machineghost Re:OOOOooo "dozens warned they MAY need to flee" (64 comments)

I care and I don't even have an uninsured house ... though to be fair my uncle and aunt do :-( Pahoa is so remote you can't even get cellphone coverage there, but it's a beautiful area (it's on the island's rainy side so everything is lush and green). Houses cost in the 100-200k range, and while that is pretty cheap it still sucks to see it all melt away.

about a month ago
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Lava Flow In Hawaii Gains Speed, Triggers Methane Explosions

machineghost Re:needs rebranding (64 comments)

No rebranding needed. The Big Island has never exactly been the key to Hawaii's tourism industry (most of the island, especially on the volcano side, doesn't even have sandy beaches.) Plus, just about everything tourist-y on that island already is lava-themed anyway. They've got a lava forest, lava tubes, steam vents powered by underground lava, the giant volcano itself ... heck they even had a highway that got overrun with lava and instead of fixing it they turned that in to a tourist attraction!

about a month ago
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We Need Distributed Social Networks More Than Ello

machineghost Re:Cool Idea, Bra (269 comments)

Altrag already answered this very well, but I just wanted to make one other point: in lots of industries the consumer can already "defect" to a competitor with absolutely no impedance. It doesn't matter if I'm buying a computer from Dell or a box of Cheerios from Safeway: nothing stops me from buying a computer or cereal from a different manufacturer the next time I want one.

However, the "defectability" possible with all those products hasn't caused Dell or General Mills to go bankrupt; quite to the contrary both companies (and many others) have found ways to make the user want to continue purchasing their goods. Similarly here, even if a social network with almost no cost of leaving were to exist, it wouldn't necessarily mean that any company operating it would go out of business. Instead, it would just mean that company has to figure out how to please its customers.

about a month ago
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We Need Distributed Social Networks More Than Ello

machineghost Re:Idiotic premise (269 comments)

If you create a service, and price it reasonably, you can charge a subscription / membership fee, and have a perfectly profitable business.

I pay for services all the time, why should an online service be any different?

There is very little evidence that that is true if you look at services on the web today. To the contrary, ads very often are the only way entire industries can profit on the web. Take newspapers: with only a handful of exceptions like the WSJ, every major newspaper in the country has had to switch to an entirely ad-supported model on the web, abandoning all their old subscription profits.

I'm not saying a paid Facebook-like service is impossible, just that there's (relatively) scant evidence that one could succeed.

about a month ago
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We Need Distributed Social Networks More Than Ello

machineghost Re:Bullshit ... (269 comments)

Isn't that the idea? Everyone gets the Facebook(-like thing) they already know and love, only without the evil corporate overlord. If that "large player" became evil, the transitory nature of the setup would let everyone easily abandon that evil player.

about a month ago
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U.K. Supermarkets Beta Test Full-Body 3D Scanners For Selfie Figurines

machineghost Re:Hypernarcissism?? (165 comments)

Artec (the company behind this) has a storefront in downtown Palo Alto, so I decided to go in and get one myself. I'm not a narcissist, I just thought it would be fun, and wound up giving my figurine to my wife as an anniversary present (like a framed photo, only 3D).

BTW for those that are curious the storefront literally uses an XBox to do the scanning (unless you pay a lot, I think $200, to use a professional grade scanner). They don't do the printing on-site so I'm not sure how that's done, and I also don't know if the booths are any different (but I wouldn't be surprised if they had an XBox powering them).

Personally I enjoyed the whole experience and would recommend it to others. Getting a 3D-printed version of yourself feels very futuristic, and it's certainly something unique to have.

about a month ago
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Ask Slashdot: Any Place For Liberal Arts Degrees In Tech?

machineghost Re:I have both (392 comments)

I think there's a special clarity one gets by being able to express the same idea in different ways and choosing the simplest -- whether that language is Lisp or English.

Amen. As a Literature major I've long felt that my essay writing skills have helped me write easier to understand and better documented code.

about 2 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: What To Do After Digitizing VHS Tapes?

machineghost Re:Welp. (268 comments)

So let's say there's a one in five chance of a burned CD going bad within the first 20 years (total B.S. number, just trying to prove a point; the real number is likely worse). That means, in addition to you, there are also three other people out there, also thinking people spout "that same tired crap".

But one guy out there just lost his life's photos/videos. Welcome to the joys of backing up on unstable media that are just "fine" most of the time.

about 2 months ago
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Kickstarter's Problem: You Have To Make the Game Before You Ask For Money

machineghost Re:Actually a good thing. (215 comments)

Here's the thing: words have multiple meanings. You can cherry-pick those definitions to "prove" KS isn't investing, or you could pick other definitions to prove the opposite.

For instance, let's take Wiktionary: if you look at the first definition instead of the second, it's "The act of investing, or state of being invested". Follow the hyperlink to investing and you'll see: "To spend money, time, or energy into something, especially for some benefit or purpose." Now, to be fair that's definition #5, but since definition #1 is "To clothe or wrap (with garments)." I think it's safe to assume the definitions aren't in order of relevance :-)

And really, the order doesn't even matter, nor does the dictionary. I imagine if I looked at some (if not all) of those other dictionaries, there'd be a similar definition of investing that does qualify for KS. But that wouldnt' prove you're "wrong"; it'd just prove that the word has multiple definitions.

So while "investing" may mean "purchasing an asset" to you, to many others it's closer to "spending money in the hope of a positive future outcome". Both definitions of the word are valid, even though once implies that KS is investing and the other implies it isn't.

about 2 months ago
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Kickstarter's Problem: You Have To Make the Game Before You Ask For Money

machineghost Re:Actually a good thing. (215 comments)

From Google, the definition of "investment" is:

"the action or process of investing money for profit or material result."

With Kickstarter you invest money for a material result (the rewards). Seems like an investment to me.

about 2 months ago

Submissions

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Bookies Predict the Future of Tech

machineghost machineghost writes  |  about 7 months ago

machineghost (622031) writes "It's one thing to make predictions about the future of tech; that happens all the time on Slashdot. But it's quite a different thing to put money on the line to back up those predictions, which is exactly what this British bookie has done. Think you know whether Google Glass will beat the iPhone, or whether we'll be ready to go to Mars and back by 2020? Now's your chance to capitalize on those predictions!"

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