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Windows 10 IE With Spartan Engine Performance Vs. Chrome and Firefox

magamiako1 Re: Looking from another angle ... (174 comments)

I disagree. Firefox and chrome were both fast for the time. IE was just that bad. Now it's not and people are starting to see that perhaps FF and Chrome aren't as good as they claim they are. There certainly not doing the best they can be.

4 days ago
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Windows 10 IE With Spartan Engine Performance Vs. Chrome and Firefox

magamiako1 Re: But does it matter any more? (174 comments)

It is incredibly important as an IT person to be able to MITM your connections on a company network. And we fully employ such functionality where we are.

First and foremost, compliance is a thing. As a personal user you may not have to care, but as a business the organization has to take special care when handling certain types of information. So we need to be able to see where that information is going.

Another reason is for IPS. Many attacks, like spam, change the locations from which they come from. But a particular type of attack is almost never going to change. There are only limited ways, for example, to exploit any individual hole in a web browser. And you can flag on that to a degree that is significantly more successful than simply being able to block IP ranges, which is about all you get if you do not MITM connections.

There are real, legitimate concerns and reasons to MITM. If you don't like it, don't do non-company things on company Internet and equipment.

4 days ago
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Gun Rights Hacktivists To Fab 3D-Printed Guns At State Capitol

magamiako1 Re: Thanks, assholes (573 comments)

This right here folks is the most important post in this thread.

about three weeks ago
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US Postal Service Suspends Telecommuting Following Massive Breach

magamiako1 Re:Why do VPN users have access to this much data? (50 comments)

* 2FA on VPN (RSA Tokens)
* Separate Administrative credentials used by IT staff
* Dedicated administrative workstations that IT staff do not use to do daily tasks (email, web, etc.)
* OR dedicated IT jump box requiring further 2FA to log in to.

about 3 months ago
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David Cameron Says Brits Should Be Taught Imperial Measures

magamiako1 Re: FP? (942 comments)

You have to be going about 10km/h over before anyone would pull you over (from my experiences and communications with locals).

They have signs on QEW that say 50km/h over = license revoked and car towed. They don't play around.

For us Americans, that's about 30 miles per hour over the speed limit. It'd be like doing 85 in a 55, 100 in a 70, etc.

about 4 months ago
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David Cameron Says Brits Should Be Taught Imperial Measures

magamiako1 Re: FP? (942 comments)

Is it? I kind of guessed. Due to the km/h being so small on my speedometer and not aligning properly, It appears to be about 64 on my mph.

That said, nobody's going to pull you over going 3km over the speed limit--so.

about 4 months ago
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David Cameron Says Brits Should Be Taught Imperial Measures

magamiako1 Re: FP? (942 comments)

I am surprised this is a thing. I cross into Canada regularly at both Fort Erie and 87/A-15 and it's funny to watch.

In Ontario, the signs say 100km/h = 60mph. This isn't quite true but it's a good safe number if you want to prevent speeding.

In Quebec, their signs say 100km/h != 60mph.

It's much closer to about 64mph. Bust people end up speeding anyway.

about 4 months ago
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You Got Your Windows In My Linux

magamiako1 Re:What's wrong with Windows Server? (613 comments)

Holy fuck a Linux/Unix guy I'd shake hands with. This is the correct answer, folks :P The minute you get into a "get off my lawn" approach to technology is the day you sign your career's death warrant.

about 5 months ago
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You Got Your Windows In My Linux

magamiako1 Re:What's wrong with Windows Server? (613 comments)

You still have to license RHEL if you intend to have support. I suppose if you don't mind going at it your own...

about 5 months ago
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Tox, a Skype Replacement Built On 'Privacy First'

magamiako1 Re:Key exchange (174 comments)

You assume that people actually pay attention to these key mismatches and don't automatically click "yes" to them.

Would be worth a social experiment just to prove you idiots wrong ;)

about 5 months ago
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Tox, a Skype Replacement Built On 'Privacy First'

magamiako1 Re: Back door (174 comments)

I wish you'd post as a logged-in user, your comments are some of the only intelligent ones in this thread.

about 5 months ago
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Munich Reverses Course, May Ditch Linux For Microsoft

magamiako1 Re:Document formats... (579 comments)

Starting with Microsoft Office 2007, the Office Open XML file formats have become the default[3] target file format of Microsoft Office.[4][5] Microsoft Office 2010 provides read support for ECMA-376, read/write support for ISO/IEC 29500 Transitional, and read support for ISO/IEC 29500 Strict.[6] Microsoft Office 2013 additionally supports both reading and writing of ISO/IEC 29500 Strict

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ooxml

Not to be confused with Open Office XML or Microsoft Office XML formats.

I didn't say Microsoft supported ALL standards, just that they support *some* standards.

about 5 months ago
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Munich Reverses Course, May Ditch Linux For Microsoft

magamiako1 Document formats... (579 comments)

What are you talking about?<br><br>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ooxml<br>http://blogs.msdn.com/b/dmahugh/archive/2010/04/06/office-s-support-for-iso-iec-29500-strict.aspx<br>http://www.iso.org/iso/home/store/catalogue_ics/catalogue_detail_ics.htm?csnumber=61798<br><br>Microsoft supports an open document standard, standardized by the ISO, with Office and has for some time, though admittedly not "Strict" support until Office 2013.

about 5 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: How Dead Is Antivirus, Exactly?

magamiako1 Re:Stockholm syndrome (331 comments)

Which, amusingly, could be ported over to Linux as well rather easily--given it's running within the user's context.

about 5 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: How Dead Is Antivirus, Exactly?

magamiako1 Re:Dead as a profit source for Symantec, well, ... (331 comments)

We use McAfee at work. With proper coaxing, it works pretty well and is unobtrusive--but it actually requires becoming familiar with the product and its features. It took a lot of trial and error.

One quick way you can help reduce A/V hit on a system is to remove zip file scanning during on-access scans and on-demand scans. Also, setting a file scan time limit can limit the amount of time the AV spends on one particular type of file.

Other antivirus solutions handle this a bit better, but McAfee is workable with the proper implementation.

about 5 months ago
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The Hidden Cost of Your New Xfinity Router

magamiako1 Re:Comcast engineer here (224 comments)

AAAAAAND furthermore, in a purely technical sense IPv6 should be faster than IPv4 connectivity when it comes to routing.

Current IPv4 implementations actually do two state table tracking. Both the NAT table and the firewall's state table. In a dual stack, native configuration; only the firewall state table is required for IPv6 traffic alone; with no NAT table required. Or, in some cases, minimal NAT tables for specific devices when you wish to deploy IPv6 only and are supporting legacy devices that do not support it.

So, in theory, routing performance should be edged up a bit in IPv6 land. Also including the fact that hosts are now doing traffic fragmentation and the router's only involvement in fragmentation is sending an ICMP response (PACKET-TOO-BIG) rather than queuing and fragmenting traffic itself. Router performance should ultimately go up by quite a bit.

about 6 months ago
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The Hidden Cost of Your New Xfinity Router

magamiako1 Re:Comcast engineer here (224 comments)

Ah, looks like100% of their broadband network is dual stack. Nice achievement for those folks.

about 6 months ago
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The Hidden Cost of Your New Xfinity Router

magamiako1 Re:Comcast engineer here (224 comments)

"Dual stack takes more resources and complexity."

Yes, it does take labor and sometimes duplication of effort, but it doesn't REALLY negatively impact actual routing performance for most people with the exception of situations where routing for v4 is done in ASICs and v6 is done in the CPU, where v6's performance will ultimately be slower than the equivalent in v4 traffic.

However, this is so rare of a hardware configuration these days in most cases. Modern firewalls/routers/edge devices are doing everything in software with powerful enough CPUs to do both, where the performance would be no different than the equivalent increase in IPv4 traffic. Juniper SRX devices run in this configuration (with BSD running as the base OS), and my Ubiquiti device runs a dual core CPU as well.

If you have any questions, why not talk to Comcast? They've deployed IPv6 in a dual stack configuration across nearly their entire residential network (as the OP noted here). Clearly if there were performance problems that negatively impacted the cost of scalability, they wouldn't have made that move.

about 6 months ago

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