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Doubling Saturated Fat In Diet Does Not Increase It In Blood

martas Re: What about a low-food diet? (137 comments)

You're claiming everyone on a keto diet is hypoglycemic? I'm pretty sure someone would have noticed that by now... It happens when first starting such a diet, but within one or two days the body adjusts and starts producing its own sugars from fat and protein.

5 hours ago
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Doubling Saturated Fat In Diet Does Not Increase It In Blood

martas Re:Calories in, calories out... (137 comments)

Yes, which is bad because it leads you to eat more, thus making the "calories in" part bigger. That was my point. What matters most is physiology -> psychology -> fat, not physiology -> fat, so you should optimize a diet for psychology subject to a fixed amount of calories. If you use information about physiology in order to do so then great, but you don't need to, and in fact it may at some point be counterproductive because the more mental energy you use thinking about physiology, the less you have left to enforce the calorie limit. I'm willing to bet many people who have had a long term struggle to lose weight have gone through cycles of "try to implement great idea that helps lose weight -> start slacking off on calorie restriction because there's already a dopamine release from eating/doing 'the right thing' -> don't lose weight -> get discouraged -> say fuck it and eat an entire pizza in one sitting". Not everyone, but many people.

5 hours ago
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Doubling Saturated Fat In Diet Does Not Increase It In Blood

martas Re:What about a low-food diet? (137 comments)

Being 100lbs overweight is an even worse idea. Obesity is so bad for health in so many ways, that I think losing weight by any means necessary, as long as it works, is overall better for you, even if in the short term it means eating a less than ideal diet.

8 hours ago
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Doubling Saturated Fat In Diet Does Not Increase It In Blood

martas Re:Calories in, calories out... (137 comments)

"Calories in, calories out" is given as a good first order approximation of reality for the purposes of weight loss (at least whenever I've seen it). This article isn't about weight loss, it's about health. It's obvious that being conducive to weight loss and being healthy are not synonymous. I could lose weight by eating nothing but cyanide.

Now, it's true that even for weight loss "calories in, calories out" is only an approximation, but based on the admittedly small amount of information I have it is basically the most practically useful one, and using more complex models is counterproductive. Ultimately for most people trying to lose weight the most limiting factor is psychology. If you have some really nice theory about how different nutrients (or even exercise) affect weight differently, chances are you will be tempted to slack off on the by far much more important "calories in, calories out" equation, because you have a limited amount of mental energy. All the physiological tricks mean jack shit if you're inputting too much energy into yourself. Now of course what you eat still matters a lot, but mainly because it affects your psychology differently -- for instance, I've heard many anecdotal reports that 1200 calories from carbs leaves people feeling much less satisfied than the same amount from fat and protein, which of course is going to make it harder for a person not to eat any more. In other words, a corollary to "calories in, calories out" is "find whichever source of calories makes it easiest for you to maintain the equation", but even then physiology matters only in the way that it affects psychology, and not directly because some sources of calories are metabolized differently than others.

8 hours ago
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What Would Have Happened If Philae Were Nuclear Powered?

martas Re:boggles the mind... (493 comments)

How does the luminance of solar radiation compare to that of the lander near itself if it were to use an RTG? Or to the heat directly conducted from the lander? Also why would the lander "mostly" radiate off into space?

2 days ago
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What Would Have Happened If Philae Were Nuclear Powered?

martas Re:boggles the mind... (493 comments)

What is thermal conductivity?

2 days ago
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Marijuana Legalized In Oregon, Alaska, and Washington DC

martas Re:Is this CO-style recreational, or just medical? (588 comments)

Good question. I wonder if there's something we could do to find out. But how.... OK, petty sarcasm aside, it's recreational but somewhat limited:

Washington, D.C.'s proposal, while scaled back compared to the Oregon proposal, allows for a person over 21 years old to posses up to two ounces of marijuana for personal use and grow up to six cannabis plants in their home. It also allows people to transfer up to one ounce of marijuana to another person, but not sell it.

(from cnn.com)

about two weeks ago
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The Inevitable Death of the Internet Troll

martas Re:Not just women (571 comments)

Ignoring the sexist nature of your comment for a moment

Wait, pointing out male privilege is sexist now? When did that happen?

about a month ago
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Microsoft Introduces Build Cadence Selection With Windows 10

martas Re:Does it rape your privacy (112 comments)

Huh, who knew solving rape would be as easy as teaching women to say no when asked "may I rape you". I guess the "no means no" campaign completely missed the mark somewhere...

about a month ago
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NPR: '80s Ads Are Responsible For the Lack of Women Coders

martas Re:1..2..3 before SJW (786 comments)

You say that men who are mean to women chase them off. Then you say men who are nice to women chase them off. And I'm pretty sure you would say that men ignoring women would chase them off. SO WHAT THE FUCK DO YOU SUGGEST?

How about treating women like you treat everyone else, so that they feel like people instead of walking tits?

(And no, I'm not an SJW, I'm a fat hairy nerd.)

about a month ago
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Soda Pop Damages Your Cells' Telomeres

martas Re:Sugar only - not diet (422 comments)

You just said "Sugar hasn't been used in most sodas for years. Sugar on the other hand.".

about a month ago
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The One App You Need On Your Resume If You Want a Job At Google

martas Re:Shash-job-vertisement (205 comments)

That being said, R is also very slow. For one project, I used R and ended up having to use a supercomputer (I only needed a few hundred Opertons out of the 4096 available) to get all the work done in time. For a followup project, I rewrote it in C++ and reran all the same stuff in the same period on a Core 2 Duo. R is really that slow.

How experienced are you with R? I ask because, while of course C++ will always be faster than R, such an enormous difference sounds like it might be due to doing things very suboptimally in R. It's really easy to have orders of magnitude difference in performance in R depending on how you do things. Of course that's possible in C++ too, but the difference is that most people who understand algorithms and architecture abstractly can probably write fairly fast code in C++ without too much familiarity with the language, whereas R, by virtue of being so high level, gives you some seemingly equivalent ways of doing things that are under the hood worlds apart.

about a month ago
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Chimpanzee "Personhood" Is Back In Court

martas Re:They'll have rights (385 comments)

I'm not sure whether or not you think you're disagreeing with me... What I wrote was meant to be a rebuttal for GP.

about a month and a half ago
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Chimpanzee "Personhood" Is Back In Court

martas Re:On Grounds of Standing Alone.... (385 comments)

Heh, well, what if the plaintiff acquired one of the animals formerly kept in captivity by someone else? Would they then be a legal guardian?

about a month and a half ago
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Chimpanzee "Personhood" Is Back In Court

martas Re:They'll have rights (385 comments)

1) Animals already have something resembling rights, in the form of animal cruelty laws; the question here is whether those rights should be expanded to include some of the things guaranteed to humans. 2) Plenty of humans (children, or, as someone else pointed out, the handicapped) can't hold down jobs or feed themselves. Chimps and dolphins, on the other hand, typically are able to feed themselves. So what you're saying is, chimps and dolphins should have more rights than children and the disabled?

about a month and a half ago
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Studies Conclude Hands-Free-calling and Apple Siri Distract Drivers

martas Re:just dont (208 comments)

Over the past couple of decades, as cell phone usage grew from essentially nobody having one to roughly everyone having one, the number of accidents per mile has been steadily decreasing. This suggests that in the grand scheme of things, either cell phones have no appreciable effect on accident rates, or that any effect that they have is more than negated by other factors, ranging from better braking and traction control to the extra cognitive ability resulting from people doing more multitasking in their daily lives.

Which, if true, would mean that if people didn't use cell phones while driving, the accident rate could be an unknown amount lower than it is.

In other words, the numbers agree with me and disagree with you. The cell phone distraction myth is just that: a myth.

Your numbers provided zero evidence to support that claim. At best, the numbers suggest that current strategies for reducing cell phone usage don't reduce accidents. This might just mean that instead of lowering the number of cell phone users, the laws make it more likely for people to hide their phones on their laps while driving, making them even more distracted.

What you're fundamentally missing is that the increased risk associated with skimming a text is over a very short period of time.

I wasn't "fundamentally missing" anything, I was making an assumption - not intended to be realistic - to illustrate why your original argument, being devoid of any evidence, was meaningless.

That means that if reading the text saves at least ten miles of driving, you're still better off reading the text than not reading it. That's not a particularly high bar. The average American has a 25.5 minute commute each way, so assuming you're equally likely to be asked to stop at any point along that route, using your numbers, on average, you're still better off reading the text message than not reading it, assuming you get it near the beginning of your trip.

Assuming every text people get is saving them ten miles of driving on average!? There is no way in hell that is anywhere close to realistic. The vast majority of calls or texts people get have absolutely nothing to do with driving. Now, if you have an agreement with, say, your spouse to only call you during your errand if something has changed, and you only take calls/texts from them and nobody else, then there is a possibility that overall you are reducing risk. But that's a fairly niche scenario.

about a month and a half ago
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Studies Conclude Hands-Free-calling and Apple Siri Distract Drivers

martas Re:just dont (208 comments)

Holy bad math batman! You are making a quantitative comparison without actually having quantities. Suppose the average phone call/text message saves 1 mile of driving; the average chance of an accident per 1 mile driven is 1 in 100,000; and the average chance of accident due to taking a call/reading a text is 1 in 10,000. Then by answering a call, one increases the chances of an accident 10x. I have no idea how close to reality those numbers are, but neither do you.

about a month and a half ago
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Hong Kong Protesters Use Mesh Networks To Organize

martas Re:About fucking time. (85 comments)

Ah, interesting.

After power was turned back on, I, and a lot of other people, went out and bought a hand-cranked USB charger(also doubles as a flashlight and radio, a handy device to be sure). It doesn't take that much energy to power a cell phone.

Unfortunately, I think a significant level of such individual disaster-preparedness will always be the exception, not the rule.

As for the tower issue, the towers where I was at(Tsukuba, which is about halfway between Tokyo and Fukushima) all kept power even after the quake but since so many people were using their phones to either call people or check the news it was almost impossible to get through(the bandwidth of the tower may have very well been degraded as well). A mesh network *might* have been useful there, but it would have had to have enough density to work.

I agree with your hesitation there -- in that scenario, it seems like the presence of a mesh network might make the congestion problem worse.

about 2 months ago
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Hong Kong Protesters Use Mesh Networks To Organize

martas Re:About fucking time. (85 comments)

The wireless networking research community has been working on mesh/ad-hoc networks for over a decade, citing communication in disaster areas as (one of the) main applications. At some point some people started to sort of laugh at it ("oh look, another mesh networking paper!"), because despite all the research it didn't seem to get any closer to reality. My guess would be that the reason why we're seeing it finally being used is because in order to be feasible, you need the density of devices to be above a certain threshold, which means a) it was never going to work in the pre-smartphone era -- with smartphones, you can just download an app to do it, but otherwise you'd pretty much need to spend major $$ to get the necessary number of dedicated devices out there, or else there needs to be wide-scale agreement to implement a specific protocol on all new devices, which was never going to happen because it's not a selling point, b) it won't really work in major natural disasters, because, well in order to maintain the density of devices, a large number of people need to have continuous access to power, which is unlikely if a disaster is so severe that communication infrastructure is offline (I imagine celltowers are less fragile than power lines).

about 2 months ago

Submissions

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WHO issues Europe measles warning

martas martas writes  |  more than 2 years ago

martas (1439879) writes "Are we seeing the results of the anti-vaccine movement? From the BBC: 'European countries need to act now to tackle measles outbreaks, the World Health Organization warns. The WHO report says there were over 26,000 measles cases in 36 European countries from January to October 2011. ... In England and Wales, there were just under 1,000 confirmed measles cases in that period — compared with just 374 in the whole of 2010. ... Zsuzsanna Jakab, WHO regional director for Europe, said: "The increase in measles in European countries reveals a serious challenge to achieving the regional measles elimination goal by 2015."'"
Link to Original Source
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Website age ratings 'an option'

martas martas writes  |  more than 5 years ago

martas (1439879) writes "'Film-style age ratings could be applied to websites to protect children from harmful and offensive material, Culture Secretary Andy Burnham has said. ... He said some content, such as clips of beheadings, was unacceptable and new standards of decency were needed.' The only reason I think this will never happen, even in the UK, is that it seems practically impossible to implement and enforce on the Internet."
Link to Original Source

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