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Weekly World News Eaten by Bat Boy!

mattatwork Are they really gone for good? (1 comments)

Couldn't they just migrate to the internet as an online publication an dsave on publishing costs...maybe pick up advertisers? I always enjoyed covers showing prominent political leaders meeting with aliens in secret locations or ones showing a boy killing the largest bee ever....

more than 6 years ago

Submissions

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Brad Stone Ruins a Near Perfect Blog

mattatwork mattatwork writes  |  more than 6 years ago

mattatwork (988481) writes "NY Times writer Brad Stone figured out the real identity of Fake Steve Jobs. With classic nick names like 'freetards' and 'beastmaster' Fake Steve captured an audience of 700,000 visitors to the site and around 50 emails a day. There is no definite plan for the future of FSJ, according to Daniel Lyons, a senior editor at Forbes magazine who maintained the blod himself...."
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One Laptop Per Child porn issue

mattatwork mattatwork writes  |  more than 6 years ago

mattatwork (988481) writes "It turns out that children in Nigeria are using their One Laptop Per Child provided PC to look at porn, according to Yahoo! News.. A representitive from OLPC said that they will now fit the laptop with filters.... It might just be me but if you're going to be giving any child a computer, shouldn't there be limits preventing them from going to non-curicular web sites...like porn?"
Link to Original Source
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mattatwork mattatwork writes  |  more than 6 years ago

mattatwork writes "Sun Microsystems just recently announced plans to port a newer version of Java (called Java FX) for the next breed of internet-connected phones. There are also rumors of Google developing their own software to compete with the likes of AJAX, Symbian, Microsoft, Palm and Research in Motion. With Java's history, is this a good thing?"
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mattatwork mattatwork writes  |  more than 6 years ago

mattatwork writes "According to Wired, senior editor Harry McCracken suddenly quit after a draft article in PC World about the 10 things they hate about Apple was initially suppressed by company CEO Colin Crawford (who knows Steve Jobs on a personal basis). What seemed like a simple dispute over an article turned out to be an overall issue of the Editor in chief clashing with the CEO over the final say in what goes down in the magazine. When questioned about it in a meeting, Crawford asserted he would have final say (see update to Wired). Is this censorship or was McCracken overreacting?"
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mattatwork mattatwork writes  |  more than 6 years ago

mattatwork writes "According to ScienceDaily, NASA has come to the conclusion that the planet Mercury may have a molten core after all, based on high-precision planetary radar readings. You may (or may not) remember the Mariner 10 probe making 3 passes by Mercury between March 29th, 1974, September 21st 1974 and March 16, 1975. Interesting development...I for one still won't be setting up a colony there anytime soon...."
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mattatwork mattatwork writes  |  more than 6 years ago

mattatwork writes "According to the NY Times, IBM is set to announce a major advance in how it makes it chips. Using an unnamed substance, IBM expects faster and more energy efficient semiconductors. They also are using a newer technique of self-assembly, which has previously been used on the biological, Molecular (nano- and micro-scale) and Supramolecular. Instead of drilling holes (like in traditional chips), heat is used to create holes for substance X to be put through. Very cool process...though it does give me a headache thinking about it...."
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mattatwork mattatwork writes  |  more than 6 years ago

mattatwork writes "I was surfing through my usual tech sites for the latest news when I came across this article on Wired News. It turns out Steve Case is not alone in the quest to fix the health care system. I guess I don't get what the big attraction for these guys are.... I know the US's health care system is messed up, but I'm not sure technology can fix all of the aches, pains and dysfunction in our current system. I don't get why they don't just join a major company's board or start a hip/trendy start-up...."
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mattatwork mattatwork writes  |  more than 6 years ago

mattatwork writes "According to the NY Times, Vonage is preparing to take it's case back down to the lower courts for a retrial of the lawsuit against them from Verizon. Their hope is that with newer approaches set forth by the supreme court that the lower courts will be able to decide whether Verizon's patent(s) are ordinary/obvious (*cough* yes) or deserve patent protection. I wonder if this time it will be more obvious to the courts that Verizon's patents aren't so original?"
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mattatwork mattatwork writes  |  more than 6 years ago

mattatwork writes "According to a NY Times article, Google has responded to the Viacom Lawsuit unfounded and claims legal safe harbor in sections of the 1998 Digital Millennium Copyright Act.

The 1998 law "balances the rights of copyright holders and the need to protect the Internet as an important new form of communication," Google said in its filing. "By seeking to make carriers and hosting providers liable for Internet communications, Viacom's complaint threatens the way hundreds of millions of people legitimately exchange information, news, entertainment, and political and artistic expression."
Viacom responded with:

"This response ignores the most important fact of the suit, which is that YouTube does not qualify for safe harbor protection under the D.M.C.A. It is obvious that YouTube has knowledge of infringing material on their site, and they are profiting from it."
Representives for Google have said they are ready to take this to court. I don't know about you, I can't wait 'till July 27 and see the rumble in the court room!"
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mattatwork mattatwork writes  |  more than 6 years ago

mattatwork (988481) writes "According to DigiTimes, Apple has put in a request to Samsung (and other NAND manufacturers) for upwards of 400-500 million 4 Gb NAND flash chips. The various parties involved in providing the memory have balked at the amount required and the risk involved in the case that the phone succeeds or tanks when it goes on sale. Is the concern surrounding the buzz about the iPhone credible or is this just leftover paranoia from the PS3 shortage?"
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mattatwork mattatwork writes  |  more than 6 years ago

mattatwork (988481) writes "A brief article on Business 2.0 shed light on little known flaw of the iPhone's design: slipperiness. According to the article:


"Overall," he added, "our source found the iPhone awesome but he mentioned, as a sole negative point, that the material used on the device's case makes it feel even more slippery than the iPod and will probably require the purchase of a protective skin or case so as to avoid unintentionally dropping it."

The article doesn't go on to suggest where the testers were found and what credentials were necessary to participate in testing the iPhones. I for one find it hard to believe Apple would let a product go anywhere near testing with a potential for slipping, falling and getting damaged...."
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mattatwork mattatwork writes  |  more than 6 years ago

mattatwork writes "I received an interesting email from my mother-in-law, and then had it forwarded again by my wife. According to WorldNetDaily, Compact Flourescent lamps (or CFL's) contain a significant amount of Mercury. While you're saving the world from global warming, you're also putting yourself and other carbon based life forms at risk to mercury poisoning. One of the victims of a CFL's mercury found out the hard and high priced way that removing the mercury couldn't be done with a simple vacuum, but by a specialized enviremental cleanup firm for around $2000. You would think someone like Al Gore, father of the Internet, would think twice before pushing a technology like CFL, still in its infancy, on consumers who don't or didn't know the risks. I know that when I get home tonight, I'm taking out my CFL's and replacing them with good ol' incandescents."

Journals

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Brad Stone Ruins a near perfect blod

mattatwork mattatwork writes  |  more than 6 years ago NY Times writer Brad Stone figured out the real identity of Fake Steve Jobs. With classic nick names like 'freetards' and 'beastmaster' Fake Steve captured an audience of 700,000 visitors to the site and around 50 emails a day. There is no definite plan for the future of FSJ, according to Daniel Lyons, a senior editor at Forbes magazine who maintained the blod himself....

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One Laptop Per Child...and porn

mattatwork mattatwork writes  |  more than 6 years ago It turns out that children in Nigeria are using their One Laptop Per Child provided PC to look at porn, according to Yahoo! News.. A representitive from OLPC said that they will now fit the laptop with filters.... It might just be me but if you're going to be giving any child a computer, shouldn't there be limits preventing them from going to non-curicular web sites...like porn?

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Nazi Documents Released to the public

mattatwork mattatwork writes  |  more than 6 years ago According ot CBS News, 50 million pages detailing the lives of some 17 million victims of the holocaust have been released to the public. They detail everything from Gestopo warrants for arrest, to the movements of the victims from their homes to the death camps. It was chilling reading of how on Hitler's birthday, a prisoner was shot and killed every two minutes. Strange also was the intricate details they kept of the prisoner's health recording small things like lice.
Sadly, after a backlog of 400,000 requests to find information about loved ones, the archive was released to the public. For issues of privacy, it no one was allowed access to them.
I wonder two things: 1) Who in their right mind could think that a small staff maintaining these files could easily handle requests relating to 17 million people? and 2) will this finally silence the holocost deniers (ie Mahmoud Ahmadinejad)

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The New Rules for Nanotech

mattatwork mattatwork writes  |  more than 6 years ago According to the NY Times, Dupont and Environment Defense are coming out with a 87 page guideline to risks and hazards of nanotechnology. The report is expected to be released today (6/21/07) and will detail interesting ways to clean water and protect material from UV light with nanotubes. As great as the uses are for different nanotechnology, Dupont admits they still don't know what the risks and side affects are.

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Ken Kutaragi retires from Sony

mattatwork mattatwork writes  |  more than 6 years ago Considered the father of the Playstation, Ken Kutaragi has announced that he will be retiring from Sony but will act as in an advisory role now with Sony Computer Entertainment, Incorporated. he has had a significant role in almost each generation of consoles starting the Nintendo's NES. With Sony posting billions of dollars in loss, what does this mean for the future of Sony's gaming consoles?

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Vonage still being put down by the Man

mattatwork mattatwork writes  |  more than 6 years ago According to the NY Times, Vonage is again getting it rough in court. The FCC requires VOIP companies to contribute to a fund that through the Universal Service Fund, which aims at bringing a variety of services to lower income Americans. The issue Vonage brought up in court was the high price they had to pay in light of a last years posted loss of $286 million. Why can't the feds stop picking on the little guy and just come up with a fair telecommunication tax accross the board?

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100% DRM free, Personal ID still attached

mattatwork mattatwork writes  |  more than 6 years ago According to My Way News, consumer watchdog and privacy groups have begun noticing the iTunes personal data that is being put into the songs consumers download off of iTunes. While these groups admit this had been prevalent with music with DRM, the information left in these higher quality, DRM-free songs could be used to track users who pirate songs. What's the big advantage or difference now if they take away the restrictions of DRM but still leave in features reminiscent of DRM?

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Can Technology Fix the Health Care System?

mattatwork mattatwork writes  |  more than 6 years ago I was surfing through my usual tech sites for the latest news when I came across this article on Wired News. It turns out Steve Case is not alone in the quest to fix the health care system. I guess I don't get what the big attraction for these guys are.... I know the US's health care system is messed up, but I'm not sure technology can fix all of the aches, pains and dysfunction in our current system. I don't get why they don't just join a major company's board or start a hip/trendy start-up....

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Vonage and Verizon — Prepare for Round 2

mattatwork mattatwork writes  |  more than 6 years ago According to the NY Times, Vonage is preparing to take it's case back down to the lower courts for a retrial of the lawsuit against them from Verizon. Their hope is that with newer approaches set forth by the supreme court that the lower courts will be able to decide whether Verizon's patent(s) are ordinary/obvious (*cough* yes) or deserve patent protection. I wonder if this time it will be more obvious to the courts that Verizon's patents aren't so original?

top

Google Responds to Viacom Lawsuit

mattatwork mattatwork writes  |  more than 6 years ago According to a NY Times article, Google has responded to the Viacom Lawsuit unfounded and claims legal safe harbor in sections of the 1998 Digital Millennium Copyright Act.

The 1998 law "balances the rights of copyright holders and the need to protect the Internet as an important new form of communication," Google said in its filing. "By seeking to make carriers and hosting providers liable for Internet communications, Viacom's complaint threatens the way hundreds of millions of people legitimately exchange information, news, entertainment, and political and artistic expression."

Viacom responded with:

"This response ignores the most important fact of the suit, which is that YouTube does not qualify for safe harbor protection under the D.M.C.A. It is obvious that YouTube has knowledge of infringing material on their site, and they are profiting from it."

Representives for Google have said they are ready to take this to court. I don't know about you, I can't wait 'till July 27 and see the rumble in the court room!

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Early submissions....

mattatwork mattatwork writes  |  more than 6 years ago I realize that I've not been part of /. for long, but I've come across a frustrating issue. I find an interesting article online, quickly go to submit it, wait for hours on end and watch as someone post a similiar link with extremely brief summary show up front and center on the front page after they submitted 2-3 hours after of me.... ah well....

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Slippery iPhone

mattatwork mattatwork writes  |  more than 6 years ago A brief article on Business 2.0 shed light on little known flaw of the iPhone's design: slipperyness. According to the article:

"Overall," he added, "our source found the iPhone awesome but he mentioned, as a sole negative point, that the material used on the device's case makes it feel even more slippery than the iPod and will probably require the purchase of a protective skin or case so as to avoid unintentionally dropping it."

I find it hard to imagine Apple would let a brand new product get anywhere near testing with a design flaw like that...make you wonder where they find their testers....

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A truly inconvenient Truh

mattatwork mattatwork writes  |  more than 6 years ago I received an interesting email from my mother-in-law, and then had it forwarded again by my wife. According to WorldNetDaily, Compact Flourescent lamps (or CFL's) contain a significant amount of Mercury. While you're saving the world from global warming, you're also putting yourself and other carbon based life forms at risk to mercury poisoning. One of the victims of a CFL's mercury found out the hard and high priced way that removing the mercury couldn't be done with a simple vacuum, but by a specialized enviremental cleanup firm for around $2000. You would think someone like Al Gore, father of the Internet, would think twice before pushing a technology like CFL, still in its infancy, on consumers who don't or didn't know the risks. I know that when I get home tonight, I'm taking out my CFL's and replacing them with good ol' incandescents.

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The G means Gangsta' in GPS

mattatwork mattatwork writes  |  about 7 years ago Word on the street according to Ars Technica is that the state of California will be tagging and releasing prisoners with gang-related offenses with small GPS devices. The goal is to watch the paroled/released criminals and make sure they stay away from gang operated areas where they live. According to the another article, the ACLU is a big fan too....

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Prepare for Apple TV 2.0!

mattatwork mattatwork writes  |  about 7 years ago According to a recent Ars Technica article:

A new Apple patent may give some foresight to the company's plans for offering a "true" multimedia center experience for the living room, as either enhancements to the Apple TV or an entirely new device. The patent is for a "Multi-media center for computing systems.

The article states that the device could take multiple inputs, including a keyboard and mouse, and allow for the external devices to actually interface with the Apple TV.

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Irony of Ironies

mattatwork mattatwork writes  |  about 7 years ago Google's recent hints at acquiring Double Click has a few feathers ruffled in the tech industry! According to Ars Technica, Microsoft has a new buddy in the cries for Anti-trust against Google. AT&T (the company that merged with Bell South, Ameritech, Pacific Telesis, Bell South and SBC), think it's unfair *sniffle* that Google would have *sniffle* 85% of the online advertising market! I'm really only surprised by two things in the article...first, that Google hasn't already, by itself, taken 85%+ of the advertising market and second why a company like Microsoft (which has something like 90%+ of the OS market) and AT&T (which has the majority of the long distance and cell market) can legitimately complain about. It's all about the money, I guess....

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