Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

MasterCard Hit By WikiLeaks Payback Attacks

mea37 Re:This has nothing to do with freedom of speech (715 comments)

First, you're confusing "the public" with the government.

Second, if you mean "Why would you assume that the government would have chosen nuclear war", then you're assuming the government would have understood the choices and their consequences, which if you study your cold war history you will find is incorrect.

In fact, I'd suggest brushing up on your history if you aren't aware of the substantial part of each government that was prepared to choose nuclear war. This is not "assumption"; it's documented history.

Here's a simpler question: if the secrecy weren't needed to make the missiles go away, then why didn't they go away (on the authority of those from whom the deals were kept secret) without the secret dealings?

more than 3 years ago
top

UK Terror Chief Blocked From Boarding Aircraft

mea37 Re:Sweet delicious irony (237 comments)

"Destruction of one culture concurrent with the rise of another" is not what airport security is intended to defend against. People being killed is what airport security is intended to defend against. You need to get your fears of cultural assimilation out of the picture, as they have nothing to do with the topic of airport screenings.

If you don't want to draw a distinction between killing everyone who doesn't conform to your culture on one hand, vs. spreading your culture through various social and political means on the other, that's your problem; reforming bigoted radicals isn't my line of work.

Oh, and profiling is not and will not be effective. A brief look at recent history will demonstrate why:

When we put more scrutiny on shoes, did the total frequency of attempted attacks go down? No, the attackers just didn't bother trying another shoe bomb.

When we put more scrutiny on liquids, did the total frequency of attempted attacks go down? No, the attackers just didn't bother trying liquids.

So if you put more scrutiny on people who match your biggoted view of what a terrorist looks like, is the frequency of attempted attacks going to go down? No, the attackers will send bomb-carriers who don't fit your profile. You think they can't recruit such people, and they laugh.

more than 3 years ago
top

Motorola Countersues Microsoft Over 16 Patents

mea37 Re:Patent War I (62 comments)

And yet, WWI didn't end guns and bombs; it merely killed a lot of people. So you draw an analogy to this conflict, where the "weapons" are patents, and think the battle will put an end to the weapon?

This isn't the first, or the last, time that a group of large companies get into a mess where each alleges the other is infringing patents, and it's not the first, or the last, where all probably have some valid claims. If the MAD analogies that keep flying around were valid, and with the first shot fired, you might think the companies would all sink - and maybe you think Congress or the Court will see the effect of the current law as too damaging and step in. But none of those things will happen, because lawsuits have an option that nuclear war doesn't: settlement.

These companies have done nothing but move their standoff from a theoretical issue hidden in their file drawers to a practical matter in court filings. I predit they will reach an agreement where all are licensed to use all of the technology involved, maybe with payments from one to another if there seems to be an imbalance in overall contribution to the IP pool, and that will be that.

more than 3 years ago
top

UK Terror Chief Blocked From Boarding Aircraft

mea37 Re:Sweet delicious irony (237 comments)

First of all, the Islamic faith is far from unique in its desire to displace conflicting cultural patterns. You might be familiar with another such religion - Christianity.

Second, there is a difference between cultural conflict and war. You need to learn to separate the two, and understand that just because the woman in a burka might want the other women around her to wear burkas does not mean that she's a terrorist. Having airport screeners harass members of one culture is not an appropriate weapon for use in a cultural conflict.

more than 3 years ago
top

Motorola Countersues Microsoft Over 16 Patents

mea37 Re:Pew Pew Pew... (62 comments)

So, do you have particular insight into these patents to back your claim that they are invalid and worthless?

Or are you one of those people who really thinks patents shouldn't exist, but won't just admit it?

Or perhaps you think you get to stipulate the terms of how a patent must be used for it to be valid and have worth, even though the system of patent laws intentionally doesn't do so?

more than 3 years ago
top

Sex Drugs and Texting

mea37 Having RTFA.... (287 comments)

Hopefully I can save someone a bit of trouble:

Yes, we all know that correlation isn't causation. The authors of the study didn't imply any such thing, and their tentative conclusions run along the lines that a common cause (parenting) could influence both texting and risky behaviors in a parallel manner.

more than 3 years ago
top

Jammie Thomas Hit With $1.5 Million Verdict

mea37 Re:Outside of the design of the system (764 comments)

Distribution is only one of many rights reserved by copyright, and again this has been true since the beginning.

The fact that it has become easier for "just anybody" to commit certain offenses does not mean that somehow they were originally meant to magically be exempt from the law if they did commit those offenses, which is what is implied by the idea that the laws "weren't meant to target" them.

more than 3 years ago
top

Jammie Thomas Hit With $1.5 Million Verdict

mea37 Re:Outside of the design of the system (764 comments)

Uh, yeah. Copyright historically has been a civil matter even for commercial infringement (and by all rights it still should be, but that's neither here nor there). That is in no way conflicting with what I said.

I'm not ignorant; you're an asshat.

more than 3 years ago
top

Jammie Thomas Hit With $1.5 Million Verdict

mea37 Re:Confused? (764 comments)

Ok... what I'm not seeing is why both sides would be motivated to settle after a ruling had been reached in the (2nd) trial. Why at that phase were there settlement talks; and if such talks broke down, why didn't the RIAA just say "fine, no settlement, pay the judgement".

Given the judge reduced the award, maybe that's the wrong question. Maybe the right question is, even if the RIAA thought "we can win a higher award again if we get a new trial", and even if Thompson thought "maybe this time I'll win or at least get a lower award"... why didn't the court just say "screw you both, this was the ruling, we're moving on down the docket"?

more than 3 years ago
top

Jammie Thomas Hit With $1.5 Million Verdict

mea37 Re:Confused? (764 comments)

Yeah, I think we all get that.

What I can't figure out from TFA is - where the hell did the 3rd trial come from?

The second trial occured because the judge ruled that he'd erred. That makes sense. Now where did the 3rd one come from? TFA says that she asked for either a reduction in damages or another trial; she got a reduction in damages... so why wasn't that the end of it?

more than 3 years ago
top

Jammie Thomas Hit With $1.5 Million Verdict

mea37 Re:Outside of the design of the system (764 comments)

Copyrights were never really meant to target individual citizens? Says who? I don't see any support for that claim in the Constitutional basis for copyright law; or in the first copyright act; or in any other subsequent copyright act that I've read...

In fact every copyright act I've read is explicitly not merely a regulation on business, as they specifically assign liability for infringement even if it isn't commercial in nature.

Perhaps you're mistaking how you'd like to see copyright used as somehow representing what it was "meant" to be used for?

more than 3 years ago
top

Google Settles Buzz Privacy Suit

mea37 Re:Important: Read This! (165 comments)

Yes, I've heard the term "selection bias"; apparently one of us knows what it means, and you aren't the one.

I'm not "selecting" the cases I'm looking at. I'm looking at every case that has impacted me in any way, and suggesting that everyone else in the discussion do the same.

If that's a biased selection, then what you're really saying is "yes, class actions that affect people are crap, but that's not a fair sample" (apparently meaning that we have to include all the cases that don't affect anyone).

When I asked you for your view of what class action is, you responded in a way typical of those defending bad law: you gave me a technical description of the intent of the law, without reference to the reality of what the law does in practice. Laws and legal practices are not judged by their intent; they are judged by their effects.

You want your argument to matter, tie it to reality. So far all you've said is that we should ignore the fact that in most people's lives class action suits are nothing but an abuse, because in theory the law allows them to be used for other things.

more than 3 years ago
top

Google Settles Buzz Privacy Suit

mea37 Prece-what? (165 comments)

"With several outstanding class action privacy suits against Facebook and Zynga, it is interesting to see Google set this precedent"

That is, of course, unless you know the first thing about the law. In that case, you are aware that one defendent deciding to settle doesn't set a precedent at all for other defendents in separate lawsuits (even if the nature of those suits is similar).

Between that, my lack of interest in suing Google over this matter, and my general antipathy toward class actions in practice, I find this terribly uninteresting.

more than 3 years ago
top

Google Settles Buzz Privacy Suit

mea37 Re:Important: Read This! (165 comments)

"slashdot's consensus about what class action cases are is really, really off-base."

Really? So you claim you've done a handful of more-legitimate class actions, and you think that overturns the common view of what class-action cases "are"?

Tell you what: enlighten us. What are class actions? Then we can all dig through our records for records of class action settlements that affected us, and see what percentage conform to your description vs. the /. concensus. I can already tell you which one covers 100% of cases that have affected me.

more than 3 years ago
top

Google Settles Buzz Privacy Suit

mea37 Re:Important: Read This! (165 comments)

Nonsense. A settlement cannot bar one party from suing another for future misdeeds.

more than 3 years ago
top

Prosecutors Request Closed Courtroom For Goldman HFT Programmer's Trial

mea37 Re:Trade secrets are worse than patents (250 comments)

There's a big difference between software that one company is using in-house, vs. software that a company is selling for others to use. Preserving trade secret protection on, say, the GIF encoding algorithms would've been pretty much impossible.

more than 3 years ago
top

Prosecutors Request Closed Courtroom For Goldman HFT Programmer's Trial

mea37 Re:Trade secrets are worse than patents (250 comments)

HFT is already pretty exclusionary, so I'm not sure that's the real issue.

Also, barring a screw-up at the PTO, you'd have to actually be ahead of the curve on HFT techniques and would only get a monopoly on those advances - not on anything necessary to doing HFT today.

And given the short expected lifetime of an HFT algorithm (particularly if one is optimistic enough to hope that the practice might become illegal in the near future) I'm not sure you'd want to invest in a patent, whereas protecting a trade secret is actually made easier if the time horizon is short.

more than 3 years ago
top

Prosecutors Request Closed Courtroom For Goldman HFT Programmer's Trial

mea37 Re:Unfair advantage (250 comments)

I keep hearing that "anyone" can do this. Please point me to where I can sign up to collocate my server with the market computers - because that is actually necessary to set up an effective HFT system.

The ability of an elite few to buy access to information about the value of an item, when that information is unavailable to others with whom they will buy and sell that item, is a violation of free market premises.

Much of what the SEC regulations do is to produce a free market. This is what many political pundits fail to understand - the "free" in free market does not mean "unregulated". The best regulatory approach in the world would never create a 100% ideal free market - money will always be able to buy research - but there's a difference between "not being able to produce a perfectly flat playing field" vs. "allowing people to artificially create an information assymetry, with the express purpose of taking profits from those on the other side of the field, with an insanely high barrier to entry for those who want to join you". HFT is the latter.

HFT is a practice that should be regulated out of existence.

more than 3 years ago
top

1928 Time Traveler Caught On Film?

mea37 Re:Western Electric Hearing Aid ca. 1925 (685 comments)

Why the person she's conversing with is invisible? Quick top 3 possibilities:

1) She's talking to herself
2) The person is behind her or otherwise out of view
3) She, and all the extras, are just wandering around chattering to produce the illusion of a background crowd, and it happens she moved into a position where the illusion breaks down if you focus on her

more than 3 years ago
top

1928 Time Traveler Caught On Film?

mea37 Re:OK, I'll bite. (685 comments)

Some were, some weren't. Among those that were, sometimes the mouthpiece was built into the base of the phone, so you might or might not use your other hand.

more than 3 years ago

Submissions

top

Real Embryonic Stem Cells with No Harm to Embryo?

mea37 mea37 writes  |  more than 6 years ago

mea37 (1201159) writes "A company in Massachusetts says they can create stem cell lines from an embryo, without harming the embryo. This is different from an earlier-reported process of making "stem cell-like" cells from skin, which so far can only produce contaminated cells with limited biomedical potential.

Although the new process is similar in its handling of embryos to tests run by fertility clinics, the chief of the NIH Stem Cell Task Force claims it is unproven whether the embryo is really unharmed. She is quoted in a Washington Post article (picked up from STLToday for access without registration) saying that the only way to prove "no harm to embryos" (and thus qualify for federal funding) would be to implant many of the embryos in women and see what happens. She further says that this would be an unethical experiment. So apparently she doesn't intend to fund any embryonic stem cell work, ever."

Journals

mea37 has no journal entries.

Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...