×

Announcing: Slashdot Deals - Explore geek apps, games, gadgets and more. (what is this?)

Thank you!

We are sorry to see you leave - Beta is different and we value the time you took to try it out. Before you decide to go, please take a look at some value-adds for Beta and learn more about it. Thank you for reading Slashdot, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Ask Slashdot: What Does the FOSS Community Currently Need?

menno_h Re:Scratch an Itch (356 comments)

Yes, the last option isn't too useful, but I for one would love an ENIAC emulator.

about 2 years ago
top

Ask Slashdot: What Does the FOSS Community Currently Need?

menno_h Scratch an Itch (356 comments)

All the great FOSS projects so far have come from someone "scratching an itch"; Linux was made because Linus didn't like the networking and terminal emulation on MINIX, gcc was created because Richard Stallman needed a Free compiler. Take that thing that always bothered you, but that you never got around to solving, and solve it.
With a database.

A few examples might be:
-a database management system that actually works (for your own definition of "works")
-an interpreter for the programming language you always wanted to build but never got around to (the standard library for this language comes with a database API)
-port the concept of a database to a platform which has never seen one, eg.: write one in PDP-1 asm, or build a database program for the ENIAC (extra credit if you build your own ENIAC emulator)

about 2 years ago
top

Dutch MP Fined For Ethical Hacking

menno_h Re:Showoff Gets Off Easy (122 comments)

For the non-Dutch: the 50plus party defends the interests of people above 50 years of age. I was quite surprised when I saw him on the Dutch news last year, showing off his "1337 h4x0r sk1llz".

about 2 years ago
top

The status of Java on my machine:

menno_h Re:Not even installed (201 comments)

No useful web site seems to need it, and my own work is in Python, C/C++, Go, or JavaScript.

Same thing here.
I hate the language; real men compile their code to real binaries (or have it interpreted from human-readable text files).

about 2 years ago
top

Hacktivism: Civil Disobedience Or Cyber Crime?

menno_h Re:MLK and friends went to jail as well (243 comments)

If you're saying it shouldn't illegal for me to break into a school's wiring cabinet and hook up my laptop to get access to things, you're a moron.

There are perfectly valid laws against burglary and breaking and entering. If Aaron Swartz were persecuted for that, no one would complain. The problem is that he was not; he was being persecuted for computer fraud and he was facing a longer prison sentence than someone who assists a terrorist group in building a nuke (20 years max), while his "computer crime" was totally victimless.
Bradley Manning did commit a nonvictimless crime. He stole secret documents, but in doing this he uncovered some far more horrible crimes of the American army. He might be a criminal, but he does not deserve a 10-year prison sentence.

about 2 years ago
top

Aaron Swartz Commits Suicide

menno_h Re:I didn't know him... but this is beyond words. (589 comments)

A man who fought for my freedom has died.
The Three Bills which he defied,
COICA, SOPA, PIPA could,
Not stop the power of the world,
Led by this great modern sage,
Who died at a far too young age,
We fought, we struggled and we won,
Aaron Schwartz was the internet's son.

Oh, Creator of Reddit and RSS,
Was it fear of the feds?
We shall never know.
We can hypothesize though,
We can talk, comment forlorn,
But Aaron Schwartz is forever gone.

Slashdot, BoingBoing, Reddit, and 4chan,
BBC and Reuters all mourn this man.

Thank you Aaron Schwartz,
I wish you would have stayed a bit longer.

about 2 years ago
top

Ask Slashdot: Advice For Getting Tech Career Back On Track

menno_h Re:You need to work on communications skills (232 comments)

"I find networking technology absolutely trivial"

A physicist's "trivial" means something more like "it won't take me more than a year to work out the general theory, and then I might be able to provide a full description somewhere in the next two years, but it isn't TOO hard.".
In other words, he groks networking technology.

about 2 years ago
top

As 2012 comes to a halt, my data takes up ...

menno_h Re:I had no idea. (172 comments)

..I had so few files.
I checked with ALSI and I was *surprised* that I had 27 full GiB of personal files.
Then I read the all these TB-scale comments...

If you include the operating systems, I have about 50 GiB.

about 2 years ago
top

Ask Slashdot: What Was Your Favorite Web Comic of 2012?

menno_h Re:Favorite Comic (321 comments)

Definitely XKCD!

+1 agree

about 2 years ago
top

In Calculator Arms Race, Casio Fires Back: Color Touchscreen ClassPad

menno_h Re:Let me be the first to say... (170 comments)

Being born in 1996, I missed out on most of computer history. Thank you, Casio and TI for allowing me to experience the growth of the computer -again.

about 2 years ago
top

In Calculator Arms Race, Casio Fires Back: Color Touchscreen ClassPad

menno_h Re:Let me be the first to say... (170 comments)

It's like re-living history.

Someone please mod this up.

about 2 years ago
top

Ask Slashdot: What do you see looking at an object a color human eye can't see?

menno_h Re:Black (4 comments)

I second that, but it could also be transparent to all wavelengths but the Long One, in which case it will be transparent.
Or semitransparent.

about 2 years ago
top

Dutch Cold Case Murder Solved After 8000 People Gave Their DNA

menno_h Re:Privacy issue: DNA dragnets (513 comments)

People were concerned about this, but the desire to get this case solved was stronger than any worry about the DNA.

more than 2 years ago
top

Dutch Cold Case Murder Solved After 8000 People Gave Their DNA

menno_h Re:Privacy issue: DNA dragnets (513 comments)

Actually, the local chief of police said they wouldn't (on a show on national television). The chance of one of your relatives submitting DNA is so large that they'll be able to arrest you if you are guilty, even if you didn't give them anything.

more than 2 years ago
top

Gate One 1.1 Released: Run Vim In Your Browser

menno_h Re:Oh Please! (150 comments)

The editor wars came to a standstill in the 90's! Why did you have to break the ceasefire?
But if we're flaming anyway, I would like to remind you that Emacs Makes Any Computer Slow and that it is a very nice operating system; it just lacks a text editor (but it's still infinitely better than nano or pico or notepad).

And real men use ed!

more than 2 years ago
top

Linus Torvalds Tries KDE, Likes It So Far

menno_h Re:Same here, and besides.. (289 comments)

It's still a little bloaty, but what isn't, honestly.

Plain X or Xmonad.

more than 2 years ago
top

US Government: You Don't Own Your Cloud Data So We Can Access It At Any Time

menno_h Re:So.... (531 comments)

I believe warrantless wire taping started under Bush....*eye roll*

What about Hoover? (The FBI guy, not the engineer.) He _started_ the whole surveillance of government subjects thing.

more than 2 years ago
top

The Evolution of the Computer Keyboard

menno_h Re:Space cadet keyboard (201 comments)

Sure, but where are you going to find beige and blue keycaps?

You'll probably have to relabel your keys anyway; might as well paint them.

more than 2 years ago

Submissions

top

Archer fish fire water jets like inkjet printers

menno_h menno_h writes  |  more than 2 years ago

menno_h (2670089) writes "Archer fish are able to hit aerial preys with a powerful jet of water in a fraction of a second. Their muscles, however, are not strong enough to produce such strong jets.
Researchers have filmed archer fish with a high speed camera and have found that the jets increase in power after leaving the fish.
The head of the jet moves slower than the tail, which catches up with the head and enlarges it, which increases the force of the jet.
This is similar to the way ink drops in drop-on-demand printers are deposited onto the paper."

Link to Original Source
top

White whale imitates human speech

menno_h menno_h writes  |  more than 2 years ago

menno_h (2670089) writes "Although dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) have been trained to match numbers and durations of human vocal bursts and reported to spontaneously match computer-generated whistles, spontaneous human voice mimicry has not previously been demonstrated.
However, after seven years in captivity, a white whale has begun to make sounds reminiscent of the human voice.
We should keep in mind that the human brain is quick to recognize words. Even partial or garbled words are identified. Reports of animal mimicry based solely on hearing vocalizations must therefore be viewed skeptically."

Link to Original Source
top

17th century microscope book is now freely readable

menno_h menno_h writes  |  more than 2 years ago

menno_h (2670089) writes "In January 1665, Samuel Pepys wrote in his diary that he stayed up till two in the morning reading a best-selling page-turner, a work that he called "the most ingenious book I read in my life." It was not a rousing history of English battles or a proto-bodice ripper. It was filled with images: of fleas, of bark, of the edges of razors.

The book was called Micrographia. It provided the reading public with its first look at the world beyond the naked eye. Its author, Robert Hooke, belonged to a brilliant circle of natural philosophers who--among many other things--were the first in England to make serious use of microscopes as scientific instruments. They were great believers in looking at the natural world for themselves rather than relying on what ancient Greek scholars had claimed. Looking under a microscope at the thousands of facets on an insect's compound eye, they saw things at the nanoscale that Aristotle could not have dreamed of. A razor's edge became a mountain range. In the chambers of a piece of bark, Hooke saw the first evidence of cells.
Micrographia is is available on Google Books now."

Link to Original Source
top

Fish scales could improve LED lights

menno_h menno_h writes  |  more than 2 years ago

menno_h (2670089) writes "Silvery fish such as sardines and herring don't polarize light in the way that most relective surfaces do, possibly to help them avoid predators.
Previously, it was thought that the fish's skin – which contains multilayer arrangements of reflective guanine crystals – would fully polarize light, and therefore become less reflective.
But University of Bristol researchers have found (paywalled) that the skin of these fish contain not one but two types of guanine crystal – each with different optical properties. By mixing these two types, the fish's skin doesn't polarize the reflected light and maintains its high reflectivity.
"Many modern day optical devices such as LED lights and low loss optical fibres use these non-polarizing types of reflectors to improve efficiency. However, these man-made reflectors currently require the use of materials with specific optical properties that are not always ideal," says PhD stident Tom Jordan.
The fish can help."

Link to Original Source
top

Dilithium-powered space ship engine in development

menno_h menno_h writes  |  more than 2 years ago

menno_h (2670089) writes "Humanity has been in space for a while, but we really haven't managed to go very far. Carl Sagan once said that "the surface of the Earth is the shore of the cosmic ocean, and recently we've waded a little way out, maybe ankle deep"—that was in 1980, and we haven't risked testing the water any deeper since then.
Ideas like warp drives are still theoretical, and unlikely to be seen within our lifetimes. However, it might be possible to cut that trip to Mars down to as few as three months. Yep, just like Star Trek."

Link to Original Source
top

Our drugs are tested on Russians

menno_h menno_h writes  |  more than 2 years ago

menno_h (2670089) writes "According to BoingBoing it's so difficult to get access to modern health care in Russia that the country is becoming a haven for medical testing — there are more people there willing to be guinea pigs for more stuff simply because they have no other way to see a doctor. This is one of those fun dilemmas where medical testing is necessary, but hard to talk wealthy, healthy people into if they already have access to health care. The result: Drugs and treatments get tried out, voluntarily, on whoever is most desperate."
top

Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Spectrometer Detects Helium in Moon's Atmosphere

menno_h menno_h writes  |  more than 2 years ago

menno_h (2670089) writes "Scientists using the Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) spectrometer aboard NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) have made the first spectroscopic observations of the noble gas helium in the tenuous atmosphere surrounding the moon."
Link to Original Source

Journals

menno_h has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?