×

Announcing: Slashdot Deals - Explore geek apps, games, gadgets and more. (what is this?)

Thank you!

We are sorry to see you leave - Beta is different and we value the time you took to try it out. Before you decide to go, please take a look at some value-adds for Beta and learn more about it. Thank you for reading Slashdot, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Verizon "End-to-End" Encrypted Calling Includes Law Enforcement Backdoor

meustrus Spies will spy (166 comments)

Spies will spy. It is preferable for the spies to have private backdoors rather than for them to research (or create) and utilize hacks that could then be used by criminals. In this case the system design also requires human interaction and a court order, making it less likely for a hacker to gain the same access. The real question is whether we should have spies at all, because if we don't want them to be able to actually spy on people why pay for them? And I am including law enforcement agencies under the term "spy" because that's what they are doing when they are investigating a case. But if we decide (as others have in the past) that it's OK to spy on suspected criminals (with oversight to ensure that the definition of "suspected criminals" does not expand), this is the right way to do it.

3 days ago
top

Civil Rights Groups Divided On Net Neutrality

meustrus Re:What does Net Neutrality even mean??? (127 comments)

Your idea to fix what's wrong with American ISPs by bringing in a European level of competition sounds very interesting. How did Europe get that kind of competition in a market with such high initial capital costs? Do you have a plan for how we could do the same in America?

about a week ago
top

Unity 8 Will Bring 'Pure' Linux Experience To Mobile Devices

meustrus Re:Ugh (125 comments)

And since you seem to be unaware of history, what you're doing is exactly what Microsoft attempted with Win8 and failed miserably at. No one wants this but you so please give up.

I've used Windows 8. Metro is pretty. And useless and annoying. But that's not because it was a bad idea. It's because like pretty much everything else Microsoft f***ed it up. Metro doesn't work the way it's supposed to, and Microsoft made it hard to avoid.

The goal is for Unity to be easy to avoid on a desktop computer. But even if that doesn't work out, you can always use Mint instead. Ubuntu doesn't belong to you; it belongs to Canonical. As long as they want Unity to work, they have a right to try and make that happen. And unlike Windows, if it doesn't work out you can replace Unity with whatever else. Or use any number of other distributions where somebody else has done exactly that.

about two weeks ago
top

Civil Rights Groups Divided On Net Neutrality

meustrus Re:How about tell them of the benefits (127 comments)

(more importantly, why should the new grocery store across town have to pay the toll?)

about two weeks ago
top

Civil Rights Groups Divided On Net Neutrality

meustrus Re:How about tell them of the benefits (127 comments)

Grocery stores are an even less appropriate analogy than water. Internet service providers do not provide an endpoint service (usually). They provide the highways. Netflix and Amazon Prime Video and YouTube are the grocery stores, and nobody is proposing that they be regulated as utilities. But it would be madness to put our roads to the grocery stores in the hands of for-profit corporations, especially if one of those corporations happens to also be NBC. Net neutrality is about telling that corporation that no, you cannot arbitrarily put up road blocks to Netflix to drive traffic to NBC. You cannot only maintain the roads to NBC. And if somebody builds a grocery store across town over and pays someone else for a highway into your residential neighborhood, you are not allowed to put up a toll booth. The residential customers are already paying for your roads in their neighborhood. Why should Netflix have to pay a toll for you to get from the residential network onto the roads they already paid for to get to their servers? Especially when NBC doesn't?

about two weeks ago
top

Civil Rights Groups Divided On Net Neutrality

meustrus Re:Fuck all these people (127 comments)

"national socialism"

You mean fascism?

about two weeks ago
top

Civil Rights Groups Divided On Net Neutrality

meustrus Re:What does Net Neutrality even mean??? (127 comments)

It's bad for users but it is neutral to the data as long as you aren't purposely forcing routes to only use that link.

ISPs are forcing Netflix to only use saturated links. Although to be less cynical, it's possible that Netflix is forced there not by explicit policy but because the links haven't been upgraded in ten years.

about two weeks ago
top

Civil Rights Groups Divided On Net Neutrality

meustrus Re:What? (127 comments)

If 1mbps always meant 1mbps, that would be a solid connection to nearly anything on the internet. The only reason it isn't is because the networks are shitty, so you get somewhere between the advertised speed and a 56K dialup speed at random, usually with awful latency. The maximum bandwidth is a terrible metric by which to sell internet, because there are any number of reasons the network won't live up to it. Of course when I buy internet I've got some idiot customer service person trying to tell me that 15mbps is needed for gaming and 7mbps won't cut it when as a programmer with experience in networking and gaming I know that the bandwidth needs are usually quite small and it's the latency (which they don't advertise) that really matters.

I wonder if the light bulb market can ever get away from "60W equivalent" marketing. How that turns out should give us an indication of how to get away from the peak bandwidth marketing for internet connections.

about two weeks ago
top

Do you worry about the singularity?

meustrus Re:No, it's not even possible (181 comments)

What a thoughtful argument you make! Perhaps what we really do need in our schools is philosophy classes where the purposes and boundaries of science - and religion - can be explored outside of the body of useful theories that result. Unfortunately philosophy is pretty squishy and is exactly the sort of thing that is being cut from existing curricula.

about two weeks ago
top

Do you worry about the singularity?

meustrus Re:No, it's not even possible (181 comments)

unless an AI is smarter than we are, it's not terribly useful

I can think of a number of uses for an AI that possesses the dexterity and visual recognition skills of a human being without nearly as much intelligence. It doesn't take that much intelligence to collect garbage or keep a bathroom clean once you know how, and you don't have to be smart enough to figure it out if someone smarter can tell you. Of course this would be pretty bad for the numerous humans employed in such operations unless we as a society can finally figure out this "post-scarcity" thing. Luckily the same mostly goes for farming; even if the robots can't do it quite as well as humans, they just have to do it well enough to produce something, because all the robots should need is free solar power. And slow solar powered self-driving cars could pick up the food and deliver it to markets all over everywhere.

Long story short, a horde of robots with human skills and less than human intelligence could finally provide us with a permanent ethical servant class. If we can maneuver our society correctly, that servant class could make the cost of living effectively zero for every single human being.

about two weeks ago
top

Do you worry about the singularity?

meustrus Re:No, it's not even possible (181 comments)

You create real intelligence when you procreate

I'm sorry, but the ability to create a human intelligence is not the same as creating an artificial intelligence. We have specialized wetware to duplicate ourselves. It isn't controlled by our minds and we didn't design it. We just know how to operate it. We don't really know how to create human intelligence besides how to trigger that self-replicating function. We are not currently any more capable of creating strong AI than is a self-replicating computer virus.

about two weeks ago
top

Do you worry about the singularity?

meustrus Re:No, it's not even possible (181 comments)

we are intelligently designing it with goal in mind.

I think you may have happened upon the real reason that creationists insist the Earth is only 6000 years old. It's not because they think the Bible actually supports such a ludicrous statement. It's because if the Earth were that young, or even somewhere close to that young, then evolution would not be a plausible explanation for the origins of the creatures that inhabit it. And in my experience, the sort of Christian that believes in a young Earth (there are others!) usually fails at convincing people to follow Jesus unless Jesus is the only option.

Sorry to potentially derail the topic. You said "intelligent design" in this context and it suddenly made sense.

about two weeks ago
top

Do you worry about the singularity?

meustrus Re:No, it's not even possible (181 comments)

The human brain uses between 20 and 40 W of power. The average mobile CPU is about the same. But it takes (as you yourself claim) a cluster of 90,000 CPUs (probably of a higher power desktop or server variant) to simulate the human brain at 1/2400 the speed. In what way will "a modern processor...use much less energy than the human brain"?

about two weeks ago
top

Cyber Ring Stole Secrets For Gaming US Stock Market

meustrus Misread Title. Disappointment. (37 comments)

When I saw "Cyber Ring Stole Secrets...", for some reason I read it as there was some super cool ring that somebody used to spy on traders. Then I thought, "I want this Cyber Ring. Where can I get one?" Then I realized they weren't talking about something James Bond might wear, and the entire story just isn't very interesting anymore.

about three weeks ago
top

Republicans Block Latest Attempt At Curbing NSA Power

meustrus Re:So basically (445 comments)

I do really appreciate having thoughtful discussions, and I'm glad my words were not lost on you. You've got some good points yourself, and although I don't really have any argument to voice right now I'm reminded of something more basic that informs my unfortunately unusual point of view.

One belief I hold that pretty much nobody in politics shares is that economic growth is not the ultimate standard by which we should judge progress in our society. Look at the last few years. A Democratic Washington has largely succeeded in turning the economy around, and we're back to growth and Wall Street profits. But how's the average American doing? Wages have been stagnant since about 1970, and that trend shows no sign of abating. Home ownership levels are not recovering. People of my generation are moving back in with their parents, and baby boomers are being forced out of their homes by gentrification. And falling unemployment levels are really due to people giving up on finding jobs, not because they found them. It's easy to look at GDP and say "we fixed it!" But growth in GDP does not necessarily mean a growth in the economy, and growth in the economy does not necessarily mean an improved standard of living for the average American, and an improved standard of living does not mean people are happier today than they were fifty years ago. We need to figure out how to measure what really improves peoples' lives, because economic growth ain't it.

about three weeks ago
top

Former HP CEO Carly Fiorina Considering US Presidential Run

meustrus Re:DOA (433 comments)

Oh, I'm sure some groups of idiots would vote for her. But elections in this country typically come down to less than a 10% margin. Surely you can agree that Slashdot is at least representative of 10% of the population's political views.

about three weeks ago
top

Book Review: Bulletproof SSL and TLS

meustrus Re:Really? (92 comments)

An invalid cert means you could be susceptible to a man in the middle attack. But even with an invalid cert, you're still more protected than without SSL. An educated user can make an educated decision. Unfortunately we are talking about mass market computer users, who as anyone in IT can tell you do the stupidest things imaginable on a daily basis. We're also dealing with web site operators that just want to put something up and let the server deal with everything with a minimum of hassle. Doing SSL at all is not easy, and doing it right is hard.

In the military, they have a standard that all technical manuals must be written for a 4th grade reading level. How to operate the tank? 400 pages that an average 10 year old could understand (with enough attention span). Every piece of open source software should have the same goal, not just for its documentation (you do have docs, right?), but for its API design. Instead, as I read in another comment by jandrese: "All of the APIs are apparently written with the thought that anyone messing with SSL should have PhD in cryptography first, because otherwise they're just going to screw it up."

about three weeks ago
top

Book Review: Bulletproof SSL and TLS

meustrus Re:Really? (92 comments)

We should concentrate on educating Web designers to only use HTTPS when it's really appropriate and necessary.

No we shouldn't. HTTPS should be everywhere. A somewhat insecure implementation of SSL is better than no SSL. Further, everything should be encrypted so that we can have some basic level of privacy. It's also not a good idea to raise a red flag for hackers to see over every "appropriate and necessary" use of strong encryption. And finally, if you want it to be illegal to spy on you, it helps to have the DMCA on your side. Any attempt to protect communications makes it a crime to break the encryption no matter how trivial it is to do so (based on my not lawyerly understanding; I am not responsible if this assumption gets you into trouble).

about three weeks ago
top

Book Review: Bulletproof SSL and TLS

meustrus Re:HEY DICE, WHAT THE FUCKHAPPENED TO MODERATING? (92 comments)

Oh, so that's why I didn't see any responses for the last week, and then this morning just a huge flood of stuff to go through. Interesting data point: the only post of mine that kicked off a lot of replies despite the messaging bug was political.

about three weeks ago
top

Former HP CEO Carly Fiorina Considering US Presidential Run

meustrus Re:I'd really love to see a woman in the White Hou (433 comments)

But it's the job of government to serve all of its consituents' best interests, not to make a profit come hell or high water.

You've got a point there, but it isn't even necessary. Mitt Romney can make a profit come hell or high water. All that Carly Fiorina can do is torpedo a successful company's profits and market share. It's reasonable (if misguided) to think that a successful CEO might have some skills that apply to political office. But Carly Fiorina is about as far from a successful CEO as you can get.

about three weeks ago

Submissions

top

Ars Says Ad Blockers Killing the Internet

meustrus meustrus writes  |  more than 4 years ago

meustrus (1588597) writes "Ars Technica reports that ad blocking is devastating to the sites you love in a 'hopefully informative' post following an experiment on Friday afternoon where they blocked access to the news site from those using ad blockers. 'There is an oft-stated misconception that if a user never clicks on ads, then blocking them won't hurt a site financially. This is wrong. Most sites, at least sites the size of ours, are paid on a per view basis.'

While advertisements may be necessary for revenue, and some sites are better about them than others, most of us install ad blocking software for those websites out there with the obnoxious screen-covering or sound-blasting advertisements. More often than the annoying ads, though, is that when a page stops loading you can look down at the status bar to see 'Waiting for doubleclick.net...'"

Link to Original Source
top

What Intel's New Integrated GPU Means

meustrus meustrus writes  |  more than 4 years ago

meustrus (1588597) writes "So Intel has released new Arrandale and Clarkdale processors with integrated GPU's. For some reason, it seems like I'm the only one who's worried about this. Early last month, Bright Side of News posted a rumor that Apple would skip this generation of Intel processors, demanding a version without built-in GPU. Why would they do this? For the last couple of years, Apple has had a good thing going with nVidia chipsets in their laptops, using GeForce 9400M integrated graphics which perform vastly superior to Intel graphics. Even with the recent developments concerning nVidia chipsets, it is still a sad day that such an arrangement becomes more and more of a faded reality.

What Intel proves to me with the integrated GPU is that it intends to pour salt in nVidia's wounds and push its graphics chips on PC designers and consumers. In my opinion this is monopolistic behavior, like trying to kill Netscape by shipping Windows with Internet Explorer. In a review of the new processors, there is a description and picture of the die for the new CPU's. Most notable is that it combines a 32nm CPU with a 45nm GPU. This is not some engineer's dream of perfection. It's a hack job pushed by management as a strategic move to put an Intel graphics chip in every computer in the world, with the eventual goal of weakening competition for third-party GPU's and chipsets which use them."
top

Windows 7 Released to MSDNAA

meustrus meustrus writes  |  more than 5 years ago

meustrus writes "Windows 7 Professional has been made available through Microsoft Developer Network Academic Alliance (MSDNAA). 32-bit and 64-bit versions are available. Also available is Windows 7 Ultimate RC and language packs. Being a university student, I have proceeded to install the 64-bit edition on my Macbook Pro 5,1 and let me tell you, it purrs."

Journals

meustrus has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?