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Fusion and Fission/LFTR: Let's Do Both, Smartly

mfwitten Closer to market (218 comments)

If you've got a valid business plan, then get investors like any other business.

about a week ago
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Debian Talks About Systemd Once Again

mfwitten Re:Some Sense Restored? (520 comments)

Compared to what Arch used to be, it is indeed worthy of the epithet "automagic".

Then again, I've always had the impression that Arch maintainers tend to confuse "Keep it Simple" with "Keep it Simplistic".

about a week ago
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New Global Plan Would Crack Down On Corporate Tax Avoidance

mfwitten Re:Perspective (324 comments)

Somalia is the result of a failed state, what was formerly known as the Somali Democratic Republic, which was governed under a single-party, Socialist rule. The resulting mayhem has nothing to do with libertarian or anarchist principles, particularly the Non-Aggression Principle. Indeed, warlords are still governmental; they forcibly appropriate other people's resources under threat of violence.

In areas of civilization where governmental organizations have not been terribly imposing, Somalia has shown massive improvement even compared to the surrounding countries that have relatively stable governmental organizations; the collapse of an unworkable, savage organization like the "government" of Somalia was probably the best thing ever to happen to Somalians despite the statist culture that has persisted through the calamity.

That which actually gives you a functional civilization is a large number of individuals trading voluntarily amongst themselves to better their own situations; profit is not merely the transfer of wealth, but rather the creation of wealth.

Government is simply a bad company that doesn't go out of business because it is able to confiscate your resources by threat of violence; it doesn't give you the goods and services for which you personally think you are paying, but you have to pay them anyway—it's totally absurd and unconscionable.

about a month ago
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New Global Plan Would Crack Down On Corporate Tax Avoidance

mfwitten Re:Perspective (324 comments)

Yes, people willingly hand over their money in exchange for the goods and services that they value.

Education, transportation, sanitation, power generation, water management, contract enforcement (or "justice") are all just industries; there is nothing magical about them—specificially, there is nothing magical that government brings to them, unless you consider the forcible appropriation of resources to be "magical".

Maybe society would have more money for those things if resources weren't instead forcibly appropriated for mass surveillance of people's private lives, drone-bombing "citizens" without due process, and ripping millions of families apart because people were caught carrying the "wrong" plants in their pockets—just to name a few of the "services" for which you're being forced to pay.

In short, you are confused; you are confusing the desire for valuable goods/services with a desire for forcible appropriation of resources. Taking people's resources by threat of violence is not a suitable foundation for civilized society.

about a month ago
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New Global Plan Would Crack Down On Corporate Tax Avoidance

mfwitten Perspective (324 comments)

A company has to convince people to hand over their resources.

A government just decrees its income under threat of violence.

about a month ago
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Unpopular Programming Languages That Are Still Lucrative

mfwitten Re:Trendy != popular (387 comments)

Allocating capital profitably is extremely beneficial to humanity.

about a month and a half ago
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Stallman Does Slides -- and Brevity -- For TEDx

mfwitten Re:Democracy is NOT freedom (326 comments)

The thing is, your words make no sense. They are specious.

about a month and a half ago
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Stallman Does Slides -- and Brevity -- For TEDx

mfwitten Re:Democracy is NOT freedom (326 comments)

I think you dont understand what I wrote.

about a month and a half ago
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Stallman Does Slides -- and Brevity -- For TEDx

mfwitten Re:Democracy is NOT freedom (326 comments)

You can't have your cake and eat it, too. Either government employees are magically more noble than the rest of humanity, or they are just as imperfect.

There is nothing magical about government.

Indeed, the only characteristic that sets a governmental organization apart from a non-governmental organization is that the governmental organization appropriates other people's resources against their will under threat of violence for noncompliance.

That is, yes, as you say, "such things seem to inevitably become some form of government", but that's because they start taking people's resources rather than convincing them to hand over those resources willingly; in short, you're saying that at worst, we could end up with government.

about a month and a half ago
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Stallman Does Slides -- and Brevity -- For TEDx

mfwitten Re:Democracy is NOT freedom (326 comments)

Murder and driving too fast are the forcible appropriation of someone else's capital.

The consent of the majority is still tyranny to the minority.

about a month and a half ago
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Stallman Does Slides -- and Brevity -- For TEDx

mfwitten Re:Democracy is NOT freedom (326 comments)

Rape, murder, and coercion are the forcible appropriation of someone else's capital.

Protection and enforcement of capital rights are not inherently governmental.

Justice certainly isn't inherently governmental; in fact, many would argue that governmental organization is inherently unjust.

about a month and a half ago
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Stallman Does Slides -- and Brevity -- For TEDx

mfwitten Democracy is NOT freedom (326 comments)

Indeed, free software projects aren't even run as democratic organizations; rather, they are emergent hierarchies formed via the spontaneous participation of individuals.

Each person involved in free software chooses how to appropriate his own resources—that is, how to appropriate his own capital, including time, intellect, money, etc. Democracy, on the other hand, is about choosing how to appropriate someone else's resources, especially against that someone else's will, especially by threat of violence as punishment for noncompliance.

Democracy is no friend of freedom, and certainly no friend of free software.

about a month and a half ago
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Interviews: Bjarne Stroustrup Answers Your Questions

mfwitten Re:The Compiler Knows... (102 comments)

I've already covered this.

As an aside, you should have already abstracted away the details of that type-specifier via at least a typedef. In other words, your argument is a straw man.

about 2 months ago
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Interviews: Bjarne Stroustrup Answers Your Questions

mfwitten Re:The Compiler Knows... (102 comments)

returning anything other than an iterator from cbegin() is a gigantic misdesign

That's precisely the point, now isn't it...

You are begging the question; you are assuming the contract; you are programming by [implicit] convention—that which plagues dynamic typing.

That is to say, such informal programming tends to be practical in these cases, but don't confuse that practicality with correctness.

about 2 months ago
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Interviews: Bjarne Stroustrup Answers Your Questions

mfwitten Re:The Compiler Knows... (102 comments)

That's begging the question; that's assuming the contract; that's the "programming by [implicit] convention" that plagues dynamic typing.

That is to say, such informal programming tends to be practical in these cases, but don't confuse that practicality with correctness.

about 2 months ago
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Interviews: Bjarne Stroustrup Answers Your Questions

mfwitten Re:The Compiler Knows... (102 comments)

There's no "again" about it.

Which part of that is difficult to grasp?

about 2 months ago
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Interviews: Bjarne Stroustrup Answers Your Questions

mfwitten The Compiler Knows... (102 comments)

auto... the compiler knows the type of MemVec.cbegin() so why should I need to repeat it?

You're not repeating it; rather, you're specifying it.

Specifying the type is establishing a contract for the following code. This can be very worthwhile.

Note how the scope of cit is now limited to its area of use.

Of course, you could have achieved the same by declaring the variable inside the for-loop; keep things looking simple via a local typedef outside the for-loop:

typedef std::vector::const_iterator CIT;
for (CIT cit = MemVec.cbegin(); cit != v.end(); ++cit) {
        if (LookForPatterm(*cit))
                return true;
}
return false;

about 2 months ago
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Interviews: Dr. Andy Chun Answers Your Questions About Artificial Intelligence

mfwitten Re:meh (33 comments)

Adam Smith called such an intelligence the "Invisible Hand".

about 3 months ago
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A Fictional Compression Metric Moves Into the Real World

mfwitten The Misra Score (133 comments)

From the article:

Misra came up with a formula

about 3 months ago

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