Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Interviews: Bjarne Stroustrup Answers Your Questions

mfwitten Re:The Compiler Knows... (102 comments)

I've already covered this.

As an aside, you should have already abstracted away the details of that type-specifier via at least a typedef. In other words, your argument is a straw man.

about two weeks ago
top

Interviews: Bjarne Stroustrup Answers Your Questions

mfwitten Re:The Compiler Knows... (102 comments)

returning anything other than an iterator from cbegin() is a gigantic misdesign

That's precisely the point, now isn't it...

You are begging the question; you are assuming the contract; you are programming by [implicit] convention—that which plagues dynamic typing.

That is to say, such informal programming tends to be practical in these cases, but don't confuse that practicality with correctness.

about two weeks ago
top

Interviews: Bjarne Stroustrup Answers Your Questions

mfwitten Re:The Compiler Knows... (102 comments)

That's begging the question; that's assuming the contract; that's the "programming by [implicit] convention" that plagues dynamic typing.

That is to say, such informal programming tends to be practical in these cases, but don't confuse that practicality with correctness.

about two weeks ago
top

Interviews: Bjarne Stroustrup Answers Your Questions

mfwitten Re:The Compiler Knows... (102 comments)

There's no "again" about it.

Which part of that is difficult to grasp?

about two weeks ago
top

Interviews: Bjarne Stroustrup Answers Your Questions

mfwitten The Compiler Knows... (102 comments)

auto... the compiler knows the type of MemVec.cbegin() so why should I need to repeat it?

You're not repeating it; rather, you're specifying it.

Specifying the type is establishing a contract for the following code. This can be very worthwhile.

Note how the scope of cit is now limited to its area of use.

Of course, you could have achieved the same by declaring the variable inside the for-loop; keep things looking simple via a local typedef outside the for-loop:

typedef std::vector::const_iterator CIT;
for (CIT cit = MemVec.cbegin(); cit != v.end(); ++cit) {
        if (LookForPatterm(*cit))
                return true;
}
return false;

about two weeks ago
top

Interviews: Dr. Andy Chun Answers Your Questions About Artificial Intelligence

mfwitten Re:meh (33 comments)

Adam Smith called such an intelligence the "Invisible Hand".

about a month ago
top

A Fictional Compression Metric Moves Into the Real World

mfwitten The Misra Score (133 comments)

From the article:

Misra came up with a formula

about a month ago
top

Interviews: Bruce Perens Answers Your Questions

mfwitten Protecting the Weak from the Strong (224 comments)

Bruce, there's a reason why the gun is called The Great Equalizer.

Indeed, in the grand scheme, you are suggesting that we take guns out of the hands of the individual, and put them solely in the hands of the State; that sounds like a transfer of power from the Weak to the Strong...

about 3 months ago
top

NASA Proposes "Water World" Theory For Origin of Life

mfwitten Re:NASA Proposes "Water World" Theory For Origin o (115 comments)

Carl Sagan, in Cosmos:

If the general picture, however, of a Big Bang followed by an expanding universe is correct, what happened before that? Was the universe devoid of all matter, and then the matter suddenly, somehow created? How did that happen?

In many cultures, the customary answer is that a "god" or "gods" created the universe out of nothing. But, if we wish to pursue this question courageously, we must of course ask the next question: Where did God come from?

If we decide that this is an unanswerable question, then why not save a step, and conclude that the origin of the universe is an unanswerable question? Or, if we say that God always existed, why not save a step and conclude that the universe always existed? There's no need for a creation—it was always here.

These are not easy questions; cosmology brings us face to face with the deepest mysteries, with the questions that were once treated only in religion and myth.

about 4 months ago
top

NASA Proposes "Water World" Theory For Origin of Life

mfwitten Re:It's alive (115 comments)

inanimate matter

What does ‘inanimate’ mean? The problem is that people are always making this bizarre differentiation between ‘animate’ and ‘inanimate’, when really there is just matter interacting with matter; some sets of interactions are more complex and organized (or, shall we say, repetitive and sustained) than other sets of interactions. Indeed, sometimes that complexity and organization is so great that we call it ‘life’ and even ‘intelligent life’, but it’s all one and the same:

Matter interacting with matter.

When you eat some metal such as calcium, that calcium may become incorporated in your bones. Is that calcium all of a sudden ‘animated’ and ‘living’? Is the water that you drink somehow ‘animated’ because it flows through your brain cells?

A child is a continuation of that complex interaction between matter that we call the parent.

about 4 months ago
top

NASA Proposes "Water World" Theory For Origin of Life

mfwitten Re:NASA Proposes "Water World" Theory For Origin o (115 comments)

Random processes

The variation may be random (whatever that really means). The selection is not random.

The whole process, evolution by variation and selection (yes, "abiogenesis" is as specious as the notion of "nonliving" matter), is decidedly not random.

about 4 months ago
top

NASA Proposes "Water World" Theory For Origin of Life

mfwitten Re:Not Evolution (115 comments)

I reject your notion that evolution is unrelated.

Both variation and selection are still at work, even on "inanimate" objects.

about 4 months ago
top

Prisoners 'could serve 1,000 year sentence in eight hours'

mfwitten Star Trek (10 comments)

This concept was considered in Star Trek: Deep Space 9's "Hard Time", in which Miles O'Brien spends a few hours being subjected to the experiences of a couple decades or so in prison.

about 5 months ago
top

Google and Microsoft Both Want To Stop Dual-Boot Windows/Android Devices

mfwitten Re:Eh..... (153 comments)

Just because you can does not mean it's supported.

Guess what? It's not supported.

about 6 months ago
top

Google and Microsoft Both Want To Stop Dual-Boot Windows/Android Devices

mfwitten Eh..... (153 comments)

* Apple has Boot Camp because they have to allow Dual Booting in order to lure in the majority of computer users—Windows users. They sure as hell aren't helping Linux users out.

* Apple introduced Boot Camp when they were still user-friendly—before they started constructing their walled guarden (located at 1984 Infinite Loop).

* Of course Apple provides the Windows drivers for Apple's own machines; every vendor that supports Windows has always had to do so.

about 6 months ago
top

Google and Microsoft Both Want To Stop Dual-Boot Windows/Android Devices

mfwitten Confederacy of Dunces (153 comments)

"When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign, that the dunces are all in confederacy against him." —Jonathan Swift

about 6 months ago
top

Linus Torvalds: Any CLA Is Fundamentally Broken

mfwitten Re:Contributions NOT wanted (279 comments)

As I already said:

publicly acceptable reason for shutting the door on those pesky newcomers.

about 7 months ago
top

Linus Torvalds: Any CLA Is Fundamentally Broken

mfwitten Contributions NOT wanted (279 comments)

The purpose of CLAs is to maintain the hegemony for the ruling clique; the very point of a CLA is to provide the entrenched bureaucrats with a publicly acceptable reason for shutting the door on those pesky newcomers.

about 7 months ago
top

Encrypted Messaging Startup Wickr Offers $100K Bug Bounty

mfwitten Re:Real Regulation (39 comments)

Corporations couldn't buy so much power if the government didn't have so much power to sell in the first place.

In other words, either the problem is economic success through voluntary interaction, or the problem is a centralized monopoly on involuntary interaction for hire to the highest bidder. Which one is it?

about 7 months ago

Submissions

mfwitten hasn't submitted any stories.

Journals

mfwitten has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>