Beta

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Are the Hard-to-Exploit Bugs In LZO Compression Algorithm Just Hype?

mishehu Re:Kernel bloat (65 comments)

Are you sure you understand what a microkernel design actually is?

about a month ago
top

America 'Has Become a War Zone'

mishehu Re:SHeriff Michael Gayer (875 comments)

It saves them money and makes use of existing stuff instead of having to build new.

No. No. And again, No. It's cheaper if we just electrocute to death everybody ever found guilty of a crime. Why don't we just electrocute them all instead of having to build those big, expensive prisons and feed people? Hell, does it even matter that they're guilty of having forgotten to pay for their livestock purchase within 24 hours?

When it comes to the police, cheaper is not necessarily better. I would rather not have police plowing through mine or my neighbor's door with an MRAP. We aren't in a war zone, the police aren't the military, and there is zero justification to make everybody feel like we're living without rights and freedoms under martial law. Some studies have shown that when police are less aggressive (possible even not carrying guns) and laws are toned down from the "let's be tough on crime and send people away to jail for 10 years for carrying around a little dead leaf in their pocket", that violence between the police and the populace also goes down.

Accountants and MBA's tend to be only concerned with financial costs and ignore the other, real costs. Surely you're not one of those? :-)

about 2 months ago
top

Al Franken Says FCC Proposed Rules Are "The Opposite of Net Neutrality"

mishehu Re:ya (282 comments)

Just because "top eyeball network providers agree" doesn't mean it's fact either. This isn't the old PSTN where carriers got paid to terminate a call from another carrier destined for your own subscribers. That model worked because that was very much so a push-model (caller on other provider calls you, you didn't send the first ring to get that entity to connect to your). The Internet in general doesn't work that way, sorry to break it to you. It is, by and in large, a pull model.

about 3 months ago
top

Apple Reportedly Buying Beats Electronics For $3.2 Billion

mishehu Re:Beats sound like garbage (198 comments)

Now with more cowbell! *clang* *clang* *clang*

about 3 months ago
top

How Apple's CarPlay Could Shore Up the Car Stereo Industry

mishehu Re:Why spend another $700 for a car stereo (194 comments)

I've done that one myself... bluetooth supporting head unit + android tablet. The only thing I've got left to do (when I have time) is to cut up a piece of polycarbonite to mount it on the center console in place of the ash tray and broken drawer on my car.

about 3 months ago
top

Can You Buy a License To Speed In California?

mishehu In Illinois... (325 comments)

there is the Fraternal Brotherhood of Police, which would give out stickers to place in your back window. Rumor was that it would cause police throughout the state to be more... forgiving... in the cases of traffic violations.

about 4 months ago
top

Silicon Valley Billionaire Takes Out $201 Million Life Insurance Policy

mishehu Re:Estate Taxes (300 comments)

You might want to read up upon the relevant laws and see that things can vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. The transfer of property and finances from a deceased parent to a minor surviving child who has no other living parent might not be penalized at all. Also, I don't think it's typical for a surviving spouse to have to pay estate taxes, and especially wouldn't have to in a community property state.

about 4 months ago
top

Silicon Valley Billionaire Takes Out $201 Million Life Insurance Policy

mishehu Re:Estate Taxes (300 comments)

They are due upon transfer of your property and finances from your estate to that of another individual. This distinction is important, because if you donate all your estate to charities none of your family will need to pay estate taxes.

about 4 months ago
top

Jewish School Removes Evolution Questions From Exams

mishehu Re:Cult (431 comments)

Even the Haredi community is more diverse than one might expect. I know several Haba"d members who are quite active on the Internet. Some of those Haba"d members enjoy popular culture and movies, and some will only ever watch whatever they deem to be educational only. I am not finding the specific affiliation for this school, so for all I know it could be Neturey Karta - in which case, nothing about them would surprise me (they spit on 8 year old girls for being "immodestly dressed").

about 5 months ago
top

Pro-Vaccination Efforts May Be Scaring Wary Parents From Shots

mishehu Re:Flu Shots are Ruining Vaccinations (482 comments)

...and yet there is no one single vaccine for the entire influenza virus family. Thus even getting the vaccine can be completely useless, and needs to be given seasonally even. And even if you're not immunocompromised, if you have egg allergies that can be a problem too.

And then let's not forget the whole "I'm healthy and young..." argument brought up by the GP... Spanish Flu about 100 years ago killed predominantly young, healthy adults.

about 5 months ago
top

California Fights Drought With Data and Psychology, Yielding 5% Usage Reduction

mishehu Re:Reduce usage - pay more (362 comments)

We're still in very bad drought in central Texas. But the common areas of many communities and the golf courses (I think we have 1 single one in the area) usually receive water for their grass from reclaimed (post-sewage treatment). I don't know if that reclaimed water is potable beyond the "water the grass" but it sure beats using fresh supply. But on the same note: wtf do we have this ridiculous obsession with grass anyway? Most of these grasses are unsuitable for this climate yet so many HOA's in the area *require* grass.

about 5 months ago
top

Confessions Of an Ex-TSA Agent: Secrets Of the I.O. Room

mishehu Re:well i'm reassured! (393 comments)

I call BS on much of your post.

I can smell plenty of it coming from your post as well.

Umm, on many of the highways I drive on in the U.S., when the oncoming traffic is placed closer (without a significant median), there are guardrails. If it's even closer, there's a concrete or double concrete barrier. You can argue that maybe we need more barriers, but engineers clearly use these solutions in many places in the U.S. when conditions warrant it.

There are *vast* stretches of highway that are just as the GP described them - completely and without any barriers other than the median. Apparently you have driven on a select few roads in this country. I've driven many very long distance trips, and about the only region I have yet to drive through is the PacNorthwest.

There's something called "adjust your driving to conditions." You simply can't always go the posted speed limit in heavy rain.

Thanks, Captain Obvious. I think the GP already stated "while driving the posted speed limit or less". I've hydroplaned at speeds of 15 mph in extremely heavy flow on I-35 near Dallas. Do you think either I or the GP continued to drive at that speed?

For normal traffic, there's no need to travel at 80 mph. In fact, it reduces gas mileage usually to go significantly above 55 or so, because air resistance increases much more rapidly and you have to fight that at high speeds.

Cite your sources for this often repeated tripe. My own MPG continues to rise until it peaks when my speed exceeds 110 mph. Most any car that I've owned (and none of them were your big honking pointless SUVs or any other sort of passenger truck) continued to increase in performance up to at least 80 mph. Even in the case of a Toyota Prius, the efficiency won't peak until approximately 75 mph. This statistic that you quote is a relic of the 1970's oil embargo years and the types of cars typically driven at that time. I somehow doubt it even applies to diesel big rigs these days either.

As for why speed limits are what they are, I'm sure there are SOME places in the U.S. where they are politically motivated... corruption is everywhere.

Probably a non-trivial number. Remember, there are many places where the police will harass and/or arrest a private citizen who visibly warns drivers that they are approaching a speed trap. If safety was the real motivation, then the police would not harass people like this. But instead it's about the money.

The human body has physiological reactions to traveling. On an open highway, with little to look at, the sound, vibrations, and general motions of the vehicle tends to lull people into relaxation and sleep at speeds around 55 mph. At speeds approaching 80 mph, everything about the vehicle tends to key the occupants into full alertness. Except for known unsafe areas, the interstates would be much SAFER with higher speed limits.

What the heck are you talking about? Citation needed. Maybe in cars from 25 years ago or in your giant truck.

To the best of my knowledge, the increase in speed limit in TX over the years did not see a significant increase in accidents or fatalities. There are plenty of roads with posted limits as high as 80 and I think even SH 130 toll has 85 even.

In most modern cars, putting the cruise control on at high speeds will result in people relaxing... it doesn't matter whether you're going 55 or 65 or 80.

Citation please.

In any case, even if there were some minor benefit in terms of alertness at 80 mph, it would largely be trumped by the vast increases of kinetic energy that happen as you go faster at high speeds -- which means a subsequent significantly greater time and effort to stop safely... or greater energy thrown into collision scenarios, which means it's more likely for injury.

You're pretty much street pizza at speeds greater than 60mph. The risk of bodily injury and the mortality rate increase from a speed of 60 mph to 80 mph is such a small number that you can consider it a foregone conclusion that you're not coming home in one piece or at all.

While the GP was describing a lot of the symptoms of the problem, the major problems with our roads are:

1. The auto industry pushed for a very long time to keep the standards of licensing of drivers to a bare minimum. This is simply not the case in places like Germany. Lower qualifications to licensing means that you have to assume more of the drivers on the road are not really capable.
2. Roads are often build to the minimum requirements. If you don't keep an eye on the contractors, they will often overstate how much building materials they actually used in order to get free money. These are old tricks on the trade. My father, as an engineering geologist, encountered unscrupulous contractors often on public works projects that he was involved with.
3. If they would build the roads to last, that would mean less annual income for the contractors. We still haven't been able to fix this problem in many parts of the country.

The vast majority of accidents are low-speed accidents with limited or no injuries in... parking lots.

Now, can somebody please explain to me what any of this has to do with the TSA?

about 6 months ago
top

Protesters Show Up At the Doorstep of Google Self-driving Car Engineer

mishehu Re:Wait so now (692 comments)

It's only slightly illegal in parts of Texas. :-)

about 6 months ago
top

You Might Rent Features & Options On Cars In the Future

mishehu How will they enforce this? (437 comments)

That is my main concern. As far as I'm concerned, if I have purchased a product, I am free to modify it as I see fit. Will they try to push for legislation to make it illegal for me to modify my car to enable those seat warmers they gave me but didn't collect from me? Will we no longer own our cars but only be licensed to use our cars?

about 6 months ago
top

An Iowa ISP's Metered Pricing: What Will the Market Bear?

mishehu Re: It doesn't cost any more to serve more data (479 comments)

The running of wiresl is what costs the money, not the upgrading of the equipment once the wires are all run. If anything, when it comes to normal customer usage scenarios, it's the interconnections that cost, and they cost regardless of whether they're being used or not. There is a huge difference between me watching 100 GB of Netflix traffic that originated right from East Buchanan Coop's racks to my endpoint on East Buchanan Coop's network than if it came from somewhere outside of their network.

As it is, your equipment is always sending some sort of traffic at all times, even if they (the data on the wire) only serve to maintain the signal on an otherwise idle line. That's just how it works.

about 6 months ago
top

Creationism In Texas Public Schools

mishehu Re:WTF do I care? (770 comments)

They can do that with their own private money then, and not receive money from the state for such things. That's the single biggest problem with this being a violation of the 1st amendment.

about 6 months ago
top

Creationism In Texas Public Schools

mishehu Re:The religion of science or else. (770 comments)

Additionally, are they teaching ALL religions' creation theories or just their own little Christian one? I mean, if they gave equal time to Muslim stories of creation, and mentioned people by their Arabic names, then sure, it wouldn't bother me nearly as much and might actually hold up to the "all competing *beliefs*", *not* "theories". Oh, I'm sorry, they'd never teach anything about those "Ay-rabs" or ... (That's the single most effective way to quash this - give them what they want but require they give equal time to beliefs that they don't believe in. It'll bring out their true colors faster than putting a brand new red shirt in a load of white laundry...)

about 6 months ago
top

Incandescent Bulbs Get a Reprieve

mishehu Re:Freakin' Riders. (767 comments)

Have you actually done the math to figure out how long it takes to break even on your purchase of new CFL's or LED's? And did you base it on "always turned on" or "according to my normal usage patterns" ? Being poor is damn expensive in the long term.

about 7 months ago
top

Overstock.com Plans To Accept Bitcoin

mishehu Re:Guesses as to end effect? (202 comments)

Why yes, that's an even better idea. Let's all have the gov't hoard all sorts of gold that could actually be used for something useful instead... You'd love for your graphics card to triple in price because now the gold for the contacts and other components is all scarce now, wouldn't you? A gold standard has a big downfall in common with BTC... it's naturally deflationary. A modest rate of inflation is not necessarily a bad thing, but having to go from paying 1/4 of your net income on your mortgage now to 1/2 of your net income in 15 years doesn't sound so hot either does it?

about 7 months ago
top

It's Not Just the NSA: Police Are Tracking Your Car

mishehu Re:It's not all a downward slide (201 comments)

I'm sure that the Boston program is only down temporarily - stupid monkey with the wrench broke things. But never fear, it will be back again in the near future under a new guise... And when it does, I will keep singing that one Rockwell song every time I get in my car...

about 7 months ago

Submissions

mishehu hasn't submitted any stories.

Journals

mishehu has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?
or Connect with...

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>