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Zuckerberg: Betting On HTML5 Was Facebook's Biggest Mistake

mlingojones For Mobile (290 comments)

Ooooh. What the article MEANS is "betting on HTML5 as a MOBILE strategy instead of writing native SMARTPHONE applications was a mistake." That's much less broad. Also, as HTML5 is still in its infancy and not yet a finished standard, I think it's kind of early to make this statement.

more than 2 years ago
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AT&T Defends Controversial FaceTime Policy Following Widespread Backlash

mlingojones Re:Preloaded App - does that make a difference? (220 comments)

It's FaceTime on an iPhone, so I seriously doubt AT&T had any say in its inclusion with the phone. Which means that no, you can't remove it at all, although you can download additional videochat apps if you so wish.

more than 2 years ago
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DirecTV CEO Scoffs At Competition From Apple TV

mlingojones Kind of reminds me of (264 comments)

then-Palm CEO Ed Colligan in 2006:

We’ve learned and struggled for a few years here figuring out how to make a decent phone. PC guys are not going to just figure this out. They’re not going to just walk in.

We all know how well that turned out for them.

more than 2 years ago
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Senate Set To Vote On the Repeal of Net Neutrality

mlingojones Re:If you don't like Net Neutrality, (345 comments)

What's the practical distinction to US citizens, though? We access the whole Internet through US-based ISPs, and the US government can impose regulations on ISPs, so as far as I'm concerned the government has the ability to control the Internet.

Of course, I would much rather have them in control than the ISPs themselves...

about 3 years ago
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Senate Set To Vote On the Repeal of Net Neutrality

mlingojones Re:If you don't like Net Neutrality, (345 comments)

That's not how it works. The reason they can do that with this Internet is that they were the ones who invented it in the first place.

about 3 years ago
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Adobe Ends Development of Flash On Mobile Browsers

mlingojones Re:The Whole Web (485 comments)

This annoys me greatly. It's supposed to be my device, HTC. (I would remove Flash completely if I could. I don't ever seem to visit websites that need Flash on my phone.)

Not to rub salt in your wound, but this seems kind of ironic given that the logic behind a lot of the attacks on iOS is that users should be able to choose whether they want to use it or not. It seems to me that not having the option not to use Flash is just as bad as not having the option to use it.

about 3 years ago
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Dennis Ritchie Day

mlingojones Really? (301 comments)

Am I missing something here that says we have to compare all these people on the merits of their accomplishments?

Steve Jobs did great things. Dennis Ritchie did great things as well. We can argue all day about who was "better" or "more influential", but what's the point? Why not just celebrate their lives to honor them, instead of to passive-aggressively piss off people who look up to someone else?

If you celebrate Dennis Ritchie, do it for his monumental contributions to computing. If you do it just because you think Steve Jobs got too much attention, you're doing a disservice to both of their memories.

about 3 years ago
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Samsung Lawyer Fails To Differentiate iPad and Galaxy Tab In Court

mlingojones Re:Big whoop (495 comments)

That is fanboy cherry picking. Go google tablet PC and check out all the old XP running tablet PCs that looked basically just like an iPad years ago.

I did. Here are the first five; tell me which of them looks remotely like an iPad to you?

more than 3 years ago
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iPhone 4 Prototype Finder Gets Probation

mlingojones Re:Here let me fix that for you. (334 comments)

Courts have rules too you know.

Yes, and in this case those rules state that you must return found property to its owner, or—if you can't find its owner—the police, otherwise it's stealing.

And where is the contention here, exactly?

more than 3 years ago
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iPhone 4 Prototype Finder Gets Probation

mlingojones Re:And how was society harmed? (334 comments)

What crime was committed? He found some prototype in a bar and sold it to some news website. What crime was committed, exactly? The guy didn't sign an NDA or anything.

Theft? Selling stolen property? If you lost your phone and the person who found it decided to sell it instead of return it to you, would it be a crime then? Or does it only become okay when it happens to a company you dislike?

more than 3 years ago
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Richard Stallman's Dissenting View of Steve Jobs

mlingojones Re:Great no-hype article on techdirt about Jobs (1452 comments)

Thaaaaaaaaaat is not Techdirt. It's a publication with a similar name but which I've never heard of (and also seems to harbor some odd hatred for Apple).

more than 3 years ago
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Richard Stallman's Dissenting View of Steve Jobs

mlingojones Re:Apple is bad. Foss is good (1452 comments)

How is it bad for someone with no programming knowledge that they aren't free to, for example, look at the source code of iOS or distribute modified versions?

more than 3 years ago
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Gizmodo Off the Hook In iPhone 4 Investigation

mlingojones Re:Good. (145 comments)

They didn't steal it.

They openly acknowledged how they got it.

In California, not turning in to the authorities a found object with a value greater than $100 is considered stealing.

They stated, simply, that if it did belong to Apple, which was not a 100% certainty but was likely, that all Apple had to do was to ask for it back through proper channels.

Because it only confirms that it belongs to Apple if Apple makes a public announcement, not asks for it back privately, right?

Instead, we saw what happened. I would rather a judge have found for them and dismissed with prejudice, but at least it appears to be working out.

I realize there's a presumption of innocence and they haven't been found guilty of anything, but come on, man. They publicly acknowledged purchasing property they knew was stolen, destroyed it, and when the owners asked for it back they wouldn't listen unless the owners would announce publicly that it was theirs. They indisputably broke the law in more than one way, and it sucks to see them getting off scot-free.

more than 3 years ago
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Google Accuses Competitors of Abusing Patents Against Android

mlingojones Re:Seriously (294 comments)

Just because YOU have described it that way doesn't make it valid. Google has a legitimate, and indeed more sustainable, business model. Deriving revenues from royalties on the platform (hardware / OS) is a loser of a business model because the margins on the platform will be constantly driven downwards. Telecom carriers routinely give away the phones to make money on data/voice services (with 2 and 3 year contracts). Google's approach to make the platform ubiquitous and make money on ads and content is simply an extension of their core business to the mobile space.

No one's deriving money from royalties—Apple is literally selling customers iPhones, and Microsoft is making OEMs license Windows. Google makes their money from advertising; Android is a loss leader for them. It is definitely a legitimate business model, but "more sustainable"? Please. Charging people money for the things you've created is the oldest business model in the world, and I don't think it's going anywhere anytime soon.

Also: telecom carriers do not give away phones, they're subsidized into the cost of the contract. It might be free up front, but you're actually paying for it every month (this is why termination fees exist: because if you terminate your contract early, you have to pay off the rest of the phone). The phone manufacturers get paid every cent of what that "free" phone costs. Sure, it goes down in value over time, but what piece of technology doesn't?

I'm sure Google would be fine if MS, Apple and Oracle retaliated in the market place with better products and services, but instead they chose to become patent trolls (see below).

MS and Apple have retaliated in the marketplace with products and services. "Better" is arguable, but you can't say their efforts to compete hinge on patent litigation; it's simply not true. Furthermore, they're not "patent trolls"—you can disagree with their use of patent litigation, but as they are actively developing and selling their products, they are not trolling.

It's almost certain than ANY large software product that does anything useful will infringe on some software patent. Google's choice NOT to license Sun's Java patents or not to simply buy Sun Microsystems is more indicative of Google's believe that any patents Android infringes are invalid or worthless.

Right, and if they know that Android infringes on someone else's intellectual property it's their responsibility to license it! This is the real world. Whether you believe software patents should be valid or not, the fact is they're legal right now. Google can't take a stand on principle and expect to get off scott-free.

No one's blaming Google for thinking software patents suck. They're blaming them for trying to get for free what everyone else has to pay for.

It goes to your point above - how does an entrenched market player respond to a disruptive technology . MS was late to the party and ineffective with it's Windows Phone 7. Sun (now Oracle) also missed the boat. They failed miserably to make J2ME relevant for the next generation of smart phones and their strategy to generate "field of use" royalties from the supposedly "open" platform was already driving handset makers such as Nokia to higher performance, royalty free platforms. So after failing to compete in the market place, Oracle and Microsoft chose to become patent trolls instead.

You don't understand what a patent troll is (see above). Whether or not the platforms are "open" is irrelevant. Microsoft, Apple and Oracle are all actively developing and selling products.

more than 3 years ago
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Google Accuses Competitors of Abusing Patents Against Android

mlingojones Re:Seriously (294 comments)

Offering consumers an alternative, ad supported revenue model is hardly peeing in the pool.

No, but giving away what other companies must charge for could be described that way.

If you are going to compete in a technology market, you have to be prepared for disruptive market entrants.

If you are going to attempt to disrupt a technology market, you have to be prepared for the existing players to retaliate.

Your assertion that Google is giving away other companies assets is yet to be proven in court.

True, but given their reaction to this patent deal it seems more than likely that they think Android might infringe on at least a few of those patents.

Of Apple, Microsoft and Oracle, only Apple has actually innovated in the mobile market, and they chose to do so with a "walled garden" strategy that is vulnerable to competition from a more open alternative.

How is this relevant?

more than 3 years ago
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Google Accuses Competitors of Abusing Patents Against Android

mlingojones Re:Seriously (294 comments)

Let's be clear: Microsoft, Apple and Oracle teamed up for the Novell patents, not the Nortel patents. And guess what: Google was invited to join up with that group to bid! They declined, bid on their own, and lost. That's entirely Google's fault, not Apple and Microsoft teaming up to take Google down.

Also, no one is blaming Google for complaining about software patents (especially on Slashdot). The patent system is broken. The reason people are calling Google hypocritical is because they played the patent game and bid for the patents, and only complained about the patents being "bogus" and their competitors being "unfair" when they lost. Google's not standing on principle here, they're just being sore losers.

more than 3 years ago
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Google Accuses Competitors of Abusing Patents Against Android

mlingojones Re:Novell, not Nortel (294 comments)

They’re doing this by banding together to acquire Novell’s old patents (the “CPTN” group including Microsoft and Apple) and Nortel’s old patents (the “Rockstar” group including Microsoft and Apple), to make sure Google didn’t get them.

Source: http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2011/08/when-patents-attack-android.html

TFS might have mixed up Novell and Nortel, but Google complained about other companies banding together for both deals.

more than 3 years ago
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Google Accuses Competitors of Abusing Patents Against Android

mlingojones Re:Seriously (294 comments)

Google already knows and is being attacked by patents already held by those companies and wanted the Nortel patents as protection against these thugs, joining them does the same thing as losing the bid. oh, but it costs them no money.

Incorrect. If Google had bid jointly with Microsoft or whomever and won, Microsoft wouldn't be able to sue Google for violating those patents since Google would co-own them. Microsoft and the other companies can sue Google precisely because they have no ownership in the patents, which is entirely Google's fault for not bidding jointly when they were offered the chance.

Microsoft's public statement about asking Google to join them was 100% PR. Remember, Microsoft had been caught assigning no less than 12 employees to one guy writing an article on a Microsoft product and even handed out coaching instructions analysed by psychologists to direct the author to write the article they way they wanted it. Not to mention that the magazine editor was hounded by a Microsoft employee to get the article written in the first place. Talk about The Wizard of Oz syndrome, Microsoft is a PR firm first and foremost.

This has nothing to do with anything. Microsoft asked Google to bid jointly with them, and they declined. Who cares what they did to some dude writing an article about a Microsoft product?

more than 3 years ago

Submissions

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Harmonix To Let Artists Add Own Songs To Rock Band

mlingojones mlingojones writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Jake Lazaroff writes "Billboard breaks the news that MTV has announced the Rock Band Network, a way for artists to add their own songs to Rock Band. There will be a public beta of the program in August. Artists and labels can either submit songs to a community of of trained individuals who can prepare the songs for them, or just do it themselves. After passing a peer-review process, the songs become available as downloadable content, and the artist gets a cut of each sale."
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XHTML 2 Cancelled

mlingojones mlingojones writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Jake Lazaroff writes "According to the W3 News Archive, the charter for the XHTML2 Working Group—set to expire on December 31st, 2009—will not be renewed. What does this mean? XHTML2 will never be a W3C recommendation, so get on the HTML 5 bandwagon now. According to the XHTML FAQ, however, the W3C does "plan for the XML serialization of HTML to remain compatible with XML." Looks like with HTML 5, we'll get the best of both worlds."
Link to Original Source
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Palm Pre Reviewed

mlingojones mlingojones writes  |  more than 5 years ago

mlingojones writes "The Palm Pre doesn't come out until June 6th, but the Boy Genius Report not only got their hands on one but also posted a review of it. They liked webOS, but not the hardware (especially the keyboard). Overall, they feel that "once people are able to play a real unit themselves, there will be more than a lot of happy Palm Pre customers.""
Link to Original Source
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Obama's 100-Day Report Card

mlingojones mlingojones writes  |  more than 5 years ago

mlingojones writes "To celebrate President Obama's 100 days in office, Wired has put together a report card grading how well he's done on key issues. He got an A- in science (pledging to use three percent of the US's GDP on science) but a D- in privacy (picking up where the Bush administration left off in defending telcos from wiretapping lawsuits). Also covered are copyright, cyber security, net neutrality and transparency."
Link to Original Source
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Warner Bros. Acquires The Pirate Bay

mlingojones mlingojones writes  |  more than 5 years ago

mlingojones writes "TorrentFreak breaks the news of The Pirate Bay's acquisition by Warner Bros.

After years of hostility, lawsuits, police raids and heated invective between the two groups, the Pirate Bay has today announced they have settled their differences with US media conglomerate Warner Bros. The largest BitTorrent tracker has sold out to Hollywood and the two have agreed a deal."

"

Link to Original Source
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How Would You Do Video Capture?

mlingojones mlingojones writes  |  more than 7 years ago

mlingojones writes "I intern at a game company trying to get more out of playtesting. We want to be able to see exactly what players will be doing onscreen without standing over them in the room. To that end, we'd like to stream the goings-on of the game from our playtesting computer (running either XP or Vista) to at least one computer running XP, and also to remotely record that video to our server. The caveat, of course, is that the software can't affect the performance of the playtesting computer. My question is: what software (or softwares) would that be?"
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iPhone Finally Unlocked

mlingojones mlingojones writes  |  more than 7 years ago

mlingojones writes "After almost two months the iPhone is finally unlocked. 17 year old George Hotz posted the hack on his blog on August 23rd. He was one of a team of six — "gray, iProof, geohot [himself], dinopio, lazyc0der, and an anonymous contributor" — who had been trying to unlock the phone since it came out on June 29th. Assisting them was the iPhone Dev Wiki, who have requested not to be linked to but can be found on IRC at #iphone@irc.osx86.hu. A video showing the unlocked iPhone is available on YouTube, where viewers can see that simply swapping the SIM card will allow the phone to connect to other GSM networks such as T-Mobile."
Link to Original Source

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